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Old Jun 09, 2011, 09:49 PM
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Well Bob, it's not the same Enya 049 you posted a picture of back several pages ago in this thread but it is an Enya 049 and it's all mine. I like this one quite a lot too. I still gotta get one like yours with the black cylinder and the rear mount carb but this one will do for now. Unlike my Enya .06 disappointment this one is truly NIB. It came in an excellent condition, original box with all the directions and advertisement and such. It was a stuck pretty hard but the acetone bath did the trick. That certainly was one of the best tips I've gotten here at RCG. Say, once you get it free do you lube them back up again?
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Old Jun 09, 2011, 10:31 PM
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Yes Whiz, keep your engine well lubed

Bill
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Old Jun 09, 2011, 10:32 PM
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[QUOTE.....Say, once you get it free do you lube them back up again?
You betcha - unless you want it to rust, that is ! Remove the plug and squirt some oil in the hole, as well as down the venturi, and turn the engine over to distribute. I would normally put at least a teaspoon of oil into an engine, enough to slosh around in the crankcase. Remember to invert the engine so's the oil gets up under the piston, and after draining out the excess, put the plug back in and bolt a prop on. Then by flicking it over, oil will get forced along the crankshaft bearing - you can prove this by watching the shaft. As the piston goes up, the shaft moves back - as the piston comes down, the shaft moves forward. Don't do all this in the kitchen however - oil your engines in the shed, as females can get quite funny about doing this in the house. BOB
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Old Jun 09, 2011, 10:36 PM
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big two stroke

Here is a big one you don't see everyday. Twin Star 240 two stroke with box. I bought a large Eindecker with this motor installed and just pulled it out. Didn't have much luck running this engine. I still have the original rope pull start as well.....imagine.


Bill
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Old Jun 09, 2011, 10:51 PM
Time for me to Fly...
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United States, MI, Fenton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin-Stack View Post
[QUOTE.....Say, once you get it free do you lube them back up again?
You betcha - unless you want it to rust, that is ! Remove the plug and squirt some oil in the hole, as well as down the venturi, and turn the engine over to distribute. I would normally put at least a teaspoon of oil into an engine, enough to slosh around in the crankcase. Remember to invert the engine so's the oil gets up under the piston, and after draining out the excess, put the plug back in and bolt a prop on. Then by flicking it over, oil will get forced along the crankshaft bearing - you can prove this by watching the shaft. As the piston goes up, the shaft moves back - as the piston comes down, the shaft moves forward. Don't do all this in the kitchen however - oil your engines in the shed, as females can get quite funny about doing this in the house. BOB
OK... Good. I've been doing just that with a shot of WD40 in the venturi and in the glow plug hole and flipping several times. I generally turn them over and let the drops come out. That's what I did with the one above after the acetone treatment.

Thanks!
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Old Jun 09, 2011, 10:53 PM
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I just found a scan of some old pages that might be interesting to somebody. Maybe.
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Old Jun 09, 2011, 10:56 PM
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It's interesting to me, 50+.... I'm going to save copies of all of those scans. Thanks for posting them!
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Old Jun 10, 2011, 08:38 PM
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The "Small" ENYA engines ie. 049, 06, 08 & 10

Mr. Wiz, here's some info on your new purchase -

Why did Enya have such a proliferation of small capacity engines? The very first one to appear (in late 1958) was the 06 glow, followed closely by the 06 Diesel, and in late 1961 by the 049. All these first generation engines featured rear induction by reed valve. The “small” Enya’s were the work of Yoshiro (youngest of the three Enya brothers) and whilst they ran quite well, they were obviously made “down to a price”, rather than “up to a standard” like the larger Enya’s. That is not to say that they were shoddily made – far from it. The thinking was more “budget” or “no frills” - as an example, all the crankshafts ran directly in the light alloy case rather than in a bronze bush, as well, the con-rods were fabricated from stamped flat metal sheet.
They also did not suffer from a lack of power – the 08, although 0.22 cc smaller than the hot little 09-III, is still quoted as having equal power output, as well as being almost half an ounce lighter, possibly pinpointing the main difference ie. maybe being less rugged than the “big” Enya 09. All of the “small” Enya’s, with the possible exception of the very first reed valve 06 glow and Diesel (ie. 049, later 06-II's, 08 & 10) were intended mainly for the home market, and were only offered for sale outside Japan very sporadically. They may have been intended for use in model air-boats & prop driven cars, as these are depicted on the included (mostly Japanese language) safety instructions, or maybe they were just trying to compete with Cox in the small engine home market. The most obvious visual difference between these small engines and the 09 and larger sizes was the 360 deg. exhaust porting (meaning of course, that they all had flat top pistons, devoid of a baffle), a non-detachable front housing and the engine size nomenclature which was cast onto the bottom of the crankcase. The material and process used to make the piston’s in these little Enya’s would appear to differ from the bigger ones too – shiny metal, Cox like, with no visible machining or lapping marks (these were never claimed to be “Hand Lapped”), and internally, they utilized a circlip retained thimble or carrier in the piston for the gudgeon pin.
Another “trademark” of the small Enya’s was the NVA, which was always un-plated brass and rigid, never flexible. As well, all the later ones had cast-in radial mount facility in conjunction with the usual beam mounts, the earlier ones with a detachable, bolt-on stamped metal radial mount. Several photo’s of Yoshiro and his models powered by these small capacity engines appeared over the years in various magazines. In MAN August 1966 he was reported as flying an R/C model, powered by four Enya 10-TV engines! The very first throttle equipped small Enya was advertised by I.M.I. in the States when they listed, in January 1961, an 06 glow with TV. This consisted of a simple butterfly valve in the venturi tube, which then had to be extended back about double normal length so the wire operating arm did not foul the optional anodised alloy radial mount, when utilized. The later TV versions (with front rotary shaft induction) all had carburetors specific (and stamped) for each size. Early models had vertical intakes, later ones with venturi angled forward to clear the annular muffler. In his 1966 Global Engine Review (as well as numerous other times over the years) Chinn stated that several of the small Enya’s “are not handled by the official U.S. Enya importers,” but that the 06-II, 08 & 10 models were released onto the Japanese home market “early this year” (1965). While spare parts for these “littlies” never seemed to appear outside of Japan, strangely in late 2009 some did start to appear on eBay (mainly just NVA’s). Unlike the larger engines, most of the small Enya’s came in a 2 piece, plastic bubble box with a clear lid, although much later versions came in the black/red factory box. Rather strangely, and as far as we know, no Engine Test was ever done on a small Enya, at least in an English language magazine. After all, they have been around for half a century, and reasonable numbers must have been sold, especially in their homeland. The later throttle units appear to be quite unique, and an expert’s evaluation on these in particular, would be most interesting. Rather incongruously, a factory sheet which came with an SS 40 BB purchased in 2005 depicts & lists the 049-IITV, 06-IITV, 08TV and the 10TV! No mention is made however, of these 4 in the specification columns, suggesting maybe (once again) that these engines were, at that time, still available in Japan but not exported to the West. BOB
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Old Jun 10, 2011, 08:57 PM
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I used my Enya .35 a couple times. First time was on my second Midwest Sky Squire. First one used an OS MAx .30 RC engine. Staggered through the air on a hand launch for about a minute, got up to about 20' altitude, snap rolled for a 50' dive into a quarry pond. The second one used the same (HEAVYY!) Controlaire 5 ch propo radio. With the Enya .35, all I ever got was an extended power glide. Plane became aerobatic with a Fox small case .40. Couldn't climb at all with the Enya. Later it got about 38 flights on a Sterling Skyshark. Not competitive for profile carrier, Last plane it was on was a Spook 72 for SAM competition. And for the climb the plane needed for limited fuel, I ended up installing a K&B Stallion .35 for competition, and an OS .35FP for sport flying.

Easy starting, easy handling, good throttle reponse, but about 1000 RPM less than any of the Eternal Fox .35 Stunt engines I have.

But of course, I also no a number of people who've had excellent service out of their Enyas. Just like while my first Wen-Mac .049 was a pile of junk, as a McCoy .040, I know people have even been able to do well in competition with them. Just like I know people wo've also been able to do something I haven't, buy a winning lottery ticket.
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Old Jun 10, 2011, 09:26 PM
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50+, that certainly doesn't sound like any ENYA 35 that I know - here's what Jack Sheeks said in Flying Models back in August 1966 (the engine a 35-III Model 5224)

“The “Demon” is a little on the large side, with a 57” wingspan and an all-up weight of 57 ounces. I originally installed a Fox 40 (old type) but I recently acquired a new Enya 35 III. We have tested just about every engine capable of pulling a stunt ship, and before we run a new engine, we always tear it down and remove any burrs or irregularities in the casting. However, this Enya was as clean as a whistle. The fit on the piston and sleeve was as close to perfect as you could ask for, with a beautiful casting too. Very seldom do you find a new engine this clean. Instead of hand lapping the engine in as usual, we decided to run it in, mainly to see if it would seize up, and how long it would take it to break in. We used Fox Superfuel and a 10-6 Top Flite prop for all the testing. Much to our surprise the engine didn’t seize up on any of the runs. We started out by running the engine at a fast four cycle for the first five runs. Then we stepped it up to a two-cycle for a continued run of 10 minutes. By this time we could feel and hear the engine picking up more power. As you know the engine comes with three venturi plugs, numbered one, two, and three. Number one is recommended for stunt or sport flying. Number two is an intermediate deal, a little more power but very controllable. Number three plug is for rat-racing, combat or speed. It also comes with a pressure fitting and a high compression head. We used the low compression head and the number two venturi plug, without pressure. After our initial break in period, we decided to see how it reacted in the air. Out came dear old “wife trainer” for test purposes. The more we flew it the better it ran, it is a good engine, and capable of doing anything we wanted. It was decided to try it out in my pride the “Demon.” This took a little conversion, as the shaft on the Enya is a little longer than that of the (Fox) 40. It was worth the effort because it pulled the 57 ounce airframe all over the sky. I like this potent powerplant very much, and I have another ship under construction now that was designed especially for the Enya. If it works out as well as we plan, you may see it at the Nats this year. We hope everyone who tries an Enya has as good luck with their engine as we have with ours.”
ENYA's normally take at least 3 hours to run-in properly, sometimes more!
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Old Jun 10, 2011, 09:29 PM
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Great story about the history of little Enyas Bob.... Thanks!

Wiz
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Old Jun 11, 2011, 01:42 PM
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Here is the latest. It's the K&B S40 that Danny drew our attention to last week. As you can see from the photos, it's new and never run. It's really quite a handsome little engine too. It says on the box "No 8065 .40 Formula 1 Racing Engine". I have to be honest, here..... I don't get it. What do I mean? Take a look down the carb. There is nothing attached to the throttle arm. In fact, nothing could be attached to it. It's just a screw holding on a handle that pivots. What does that do? Now the carb is a funny shape on that end on the outside and there is a large hole in the throttle arm. What's it do just pinch the fuel line closed or something?
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Old Jun 11, 2011, 02:04 PM
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Oh and a question to your more experienced engine collectors. Are there any collectable YS engines? I ask this because I'm intrigued by them with their fuel pumps and Superchargers and all. Every so often I see a nice older .60 or .45 2-cycle for sale and I'm tempted to buy one but I'm not sure what they might be worth.
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Old Jun 11, 2011, 09:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Wiz View Post
Here is the latest. It's the K&B S40 that Danny drew our attention to last week. As you can see from the photos, it's new and never run. It's really quite a handsome little engine too. It says on the box "No 8065 .40 Formula 1 Racing Engine". I have to be honest, here..... I don't get it. What do I mean? Take a look down the carb. There is nothing attached to the throttle arm. In fact, nothing could be attached to it. It's just a screw holding on a handle that pivots. What does that do? Now the carb is a funny shape on that end on the outside and there is a large hole in the throttle arm. What's it do just pinch the fuel line closed or something?
Mr. Wiz, your K&B 40 #8065 is designed for pylon racing, thus it doesn't have a throttle. These things are designed to deliver huge power at mega revs, and they don't like idling at all. The thingy you're talking about is a fuel shut-off - there should be a short length of very soft & pliable fuel tubing in the box, which is easily squashed to shut the engine down. May I refer you to the K&B 40 Engine Test on page 26, post #382. BOB
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Old Jun 11, 2011, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Wiz View Post
Oh and a question to your more experienced engine collectors. Are there any collectable YS engines? I ask this because I'm intrigued by them with their fuel pumps and Superchargers and all. Every so often I see a nice older .60 or .45 2-cycle for sale and I'm tempted to buy one but I'm not sure what they might be worth.
Mr. Wiz, Any engine is collectable if you like 'em ! With the YS engines, they seem to have a "gadget" factor, and I myself am a sucker for gadgets (I bought an ENYA 60 XF-4 just to get the fuel pump built into the backplate ! ). Be aware though that if you buy a used supercharged YS or OS engine and the thing is gummed up, you will need an expert to strip the thing down and de-gum it, which could cost big bucks. BOB
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