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Old Feb 22, 2011, 09:40 PM
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Interesing. Nope, I don't recall ever seeing those models.
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Old Feb 23, 2011, 09:36 AM
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Neat stuff, guys. I like to see where the hobby has been with fun old designs like that Great Speckled Bird. I wish more designers paid attention to looks. Or I suppose had matching aesthetic sensibilities. I'm picky enough I'm going to have to start building my own designs soon. Nothing wrong with that, right?

I have no progress to report yet. Non-Modeling Life has intervened and it may be a few days before I get more building in.
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Old Feb 23, 2011, 10:40 AM
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Neat stuff, guys. I like to see where the hobby has been with fun old designs like that Great Speckled Bird. I wish more designers paid attention to looks. Or I suppose had matching aesthetic sensibilities. I'm picky enough I'm going to have to start building my own designs soon. Nothing wrong with that, right?

I have no progress to report yet. Non-Modeling Life has intervened and it may be a few days before I get more building in.
Oh... I just noticed that you're in FC, cool!
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Old Feb 23, 2011, 12:58 PM
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Oh... I just noticed that you're in FC, cool!
Yeah. I'm close to Denver, but not close enough. There only seems to be power clubs up here
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Old Feb 24, 2011, 01:49 PM
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Mostly power guys, but great guys. I'm not a "member" of the Modeleers, but have been up to their flying field at the Owl Canyon exit. It's a nice place and nice people - but can be very windy!

I mostly fly alone, but there are some other glider-guiders here. And it is not a bad drive down to the RMSA field in north Denver. I haven't been down there for a year or so, but those guys can really fly gliders!

Sorry to get so far off topic, but I'll PM you.

Dale
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Old Feb 24, 2011, 10:37 PM
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Joined Dec 2003
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ieyasu, thanks for taking the time to do this. I have been looking at the Chrysalis for a long time but wanted to see the inner workings first. I am going to be keeping a close eye on this to see how it turns out. I am also glad you are using Titebond. I plan on building my next plane with Gorilla's white glue.
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Old Feb 25, 2011, 12:45 AM
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Gorilla's new wood glue is another PVA-based ("Poly-Vinyl Acetate") adhesive, so should be essentially equivalent to Titebond.
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Old Feb 26, 2011, 08:59 PM
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Back at it

I'm back at it! So far this weekend I've got the first half of the wing braced and sheeted, and I've started in on the right wing half. It took some doing to figure out how to cut and sand the braces accurately, but it came out well enough. It's amazing to me how effectively they resist torsion. I've got my head wrapped around the D tube construction but not these braces.

I also eventually figured out a good way to prepare the sheeting where it connects with the leading edge. First, I cut the rear edge (where it meets the main spar) to the right angle, then placing the sheeting back in place, I mark where the sheet and the ribs meet the L.E. I flip the sheet over onto a cutting mat, draw a line between the marks and sand all the way through the sheet up to the line. I sand with a dowel which is a scrap piece of L.E. material which gives a nearly exact radius to mate flush with that leading edge.

I decided to skip the step where you clean up excess bits of spar from the first wing half and instead started building the other half. Not much to report except that it's going even faster this time since I know what I'm doing.
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Old Feb 26, 2011, 09:06 PM
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I just cut the front edge of the first piece of sheeting to line up with the middle of the leading edge dowel when viewed from above, then sand about a 30-40 degree bevel on the underside of that edge. The piece will snuggle down into place when glued to the wing (give it a dry, trial fit first), and then a little work on the outer surface will blend it in perfectly with the leading edge dowel. Balsa is flexble, and when you sand the bevel into the edge, it wil be flexible enough to conform to the dowel surprisingly well with just finger pressure.

What you describe probably gives a better fit, but the easy way is close enough, and somewhat quicker.
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Old Feb 28, 2011, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Don Stackhouse View Post
I just cut the front edge of the first piece of sheeting to line up with the middle of the leading edge dowel when viewed from above, then sand about a 30-40 degree bevel on the underside of that edge. The piece will snuggle down into place when glued to the wing (give it a dry, trial fit first), and then a little work on the outer surface will blend it in perfectly with the leading edge dowel. Balsa is flexble, and when you sand the bevel into the edge, it wil be flexible enough to conform to the dowel surprisingly well with just finger pressure.

What you describe probably gives a better fit, but the easy way is close enough, and somewhat quicker.
Unfortunately, I can't get the 'easy' way to work for me. I'm always rounding the edges off on things I sand, and not sure what I'm doing wrong. I want to blame the squishy rubber pad on the sanding blocks i've been using, but who knows...
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Old Feb 28, 2011, 04:50 PM
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If they are THAT squishy, then yes, that's probably your problem. Could also be technique, you need to make sure you're holding the block at a CONSTANT angle as it moves back and forth, not rocking around the edge. Also, if you're pushing too hard, that makes the squishiness more of a factor.

At least one of those possibilities is easy to fix. Get a piece of old 2x4, cut some wood blocks a convenient size from it, then rubber cement some sandpaper of various grits to them. When the sandpaper wears out, peel it off and rubber cement some new sandpaper to it. The only time you need a padded sanding block is if you're sanding something that is supposed to be curved when you're done.

We intended for the Chrysalis to be a trainer for building, as well as for flight training, and as a good sport model when you get off the steep part of the learning curve. The skills and knowledge you're accumulating now will serve you well on every model you build after this one.
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Old Feb 28, 2011, 06:02 PM
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Yup! Learning quite a lot. I feel like I've been doing this stuff for a while, but that's with many years between kits and no one to show me the ropes in person.

I've attached a picture of one of the sanding blocks I've been using. They look nice in the store, but they're starting to lose their appeal. I'll try making some nice hard all-wood blocks to replace them.

It's pretty hard for me to hold anything at a constant angle, or so it seems. That could be it right there. And how do I know if I'm pushing too hard? If I hardly push it hardly sands...
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Old Feb 28, 2011, 06:53 PM
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Those are nice sanding blocks. I have several of those myself. However, I do NOT use them when I'm tring to sand a flat surface.

A proper (straight) sanding stroke is a bit like a good golf swing, or good technique with a fiddle bow, it's something you have to work on and practice. To do it right really requires the entire hand, wrist and arm, and sometimes more than that.

Think "The Karate Kid". "Paint the fence..." "Sand the floor..." "Wax on, wax off..."

However, for starters, you can come close by holding the part so your arm is bent 90 degrees at the elbow, and your forearm is parallel to the surface being sanded. Put the sanding block in position, and keep your wrist ABSOLUTELY stiff and still. Move back and forth with your forearm, so the rotation at your elbow is equal and opposite to the rotation at your shoulder. That will make your forearm move in an almost straight line, and if you keep your wrist still, so will the sanding block.

A longer sanding block will make it easier to see if you're keeping it straight as you sand.
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Old Feb 28, 2011, 07:31 PM
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These are my favorites for straight, even sanding
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Old Mar 01, 2011, 09:39 AM
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ieyasu:

Another tip for sanding: use only light pressure, move slowly.

The tendency I have is to sand vigorously and hard, but over the years, I have fought that, and now sanding anything is something that "goes slowly, but is completed swiftly". Make sense? I had to concentrate very hard to make myself quit working hard.

Like with any tool: the worker should make the sandpaper do the work, not do the work himself (or, herself - I do wish there were more women doing this).

Good luck!

Yours, Greg
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