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ElectriFly Yak-55M Sport Scale Aerobatic Airplane ARF Review

The latest release in the E Performance series of aerobatic models is the Yakovlev 55M. As I review this beautiful ARF from ElectriFly, my "love at first sight" blossoms into "living happily ever after"!

Splash

 

Wing span: 51 in
Length: 47 in
Weight: 3.5 to 3.75 lbs
Battery: 3S 2200mAh lipo
Motor: ElectriFly RimFire 32
ESC: ElectriFly Silver Series 45
Distributed by: TowerHobbies
Price: $169.99

The Yakovlev 55M (short wing version) is an aerobatic aircraft first produced in 1989. The project director of the Yak 55 was S.A. Yakovlev. The aircraft features a 360 horsepower Vedeneyev M14P 9 cylinder radial engine, with the prop spinning a somewhat unconventional (at least by US standards) counter-clockwise direction. The aircraft is of a conventional semi-monocoque all-metal construction. Thanks to Great Planes, it is now possible to fly the same airplane selected by the the Soviet aerobatic team for the 1989 European Championships. The ElectriFly Yak 55M was designed to capture many of the flying qualities of the full scale Yak 55M in a relatively compact 51" wingspan, lightweight electric powered ARF that can even be used to practice for IMAC competition! Read on to learn more about this latest offering in ElectriFly's E Performance Series of ARFs.

Kit Contents

The ElectriFly Yak 55M comes packaged in a graphically snappy box, featuring colorful photographs of the assembled model taken from multiple angles and a list of the basic specifications of the model. Each and every main component comes in its own plastic bag or sleeve. The covering on my kit components was tight and almost wrinkle free. I have always liked the quality of the fiberglass components in the E Performance Series kits, and this Yak continues the tradition. The wheel spats and cowl are nicely done, with deep and vibrant paint applied at the factory. The color matching between the cowl and fuselage is superb. I also like the plastic cowl louver piece that is included in the box. The rounded vertical stabilizer and rudder and teardrop canopy help capture the iconic and rounded look of the Yak 55M.

In The Box:

  • Fuselage, with removable canopy/foredeck hatch
  • Wing halves
  • Horizontal stabilizer
  • Rudder
  • Fiberglass cowl
  • Cockpit floor
  • Wing joiner rod
  • Fiberglass wheel spats
  • Main landing gear
  • Tail wheel assembly
  • 20 page black and white photo-illustrated assembly manual
  • Decal sheet
  • Cowl louvers
  • Plastic spinner






Required for Completion:

  • Minimum four channel radio system
  • Four micro servos (Futaba S3115 micro or Futaba S3150 digital recommended)
  • Electronic speed controller capable of handling 45 amps
  • 4S 25C 2200mAh capacity lipoly battery
  • .32 sized brushless outrunner motor
  • Propeller
  • Two 16", three 9" servo extensions, one servo Y harness

Included for Review:

  • Great Planes ElectriFly Silver Series SS-45, 45A brushless ESC
  • Great Planes ElectriFly Power Series 2200mAh 14.8V 25C LiPo battery
  • Futaba R617FS 2.4 GHz FASST 7 channel receiver
  • Futaba S3150 Slim Digital servos (4)
  • APC 12x6e electric propeller
  • All required servo extensions and one Y harness






Assembly

The instruction manual for the Yak 55M does a very good job of detailing all that is required to ready the ARF for flight. From guidelines to help you select the proper radio gear and power system components to a pre-flight checklist that includes all of the items that can be accidentally overlooked in the anxiety of pre-maiden jitters, ElectriFly crams an abundance of useful information and black and white assembly photographs into 19 pages.




Though most of us have a shortage of time to sit and read the assembly manual from cover to cover before we actually commence with the assembly, doing so will ensure that nothing is overlooked and that the Yak gets built as designed. Three different colors of Top Flite Monokote are used to create the red, white and blue color scheme of the Yak. Part numbers to order replacement parts are also provided near the front of the manual.

Online Version of Yak-55M Assembly Manual

Wing

Assembly of the two wing halves includes installing the aileron servos, making up the aileron push rods and installing the control horns on the aileron horns on the bottom of the aileron surfaces. Nine inch servo extensions must be used in order for the aileron servo leads to reach into the fuselage for connection to the receiver. The plastic wing alignment pins need to be glued into the wing roots.




ElectriFly recommends using either of two different servos for the Yak 55M. The Futaba 3115 micro precision servo is the more affordably priced unit, as compared to the Futaba S3150 slim digital servo. The latter servos bring improved specifications to the table, in the form of an additional 12 oz-in of torque. I was excited to see the better, digital servos included with my review copy of the Yak 55M. The slightly larger dimensions of the 3150 servos required that the servo openings be opened up by a scant amount. I use an emery board, obtained from any beauty supply store, to accomplish this task with just a few quick strokes. The servos are mounted with small screws but only after hardening the mounting holes with a drop or two of CA.



Other important tasks that must be carried out are hardening the servo and control horn mounting holes with CA, using a piece of heat shrink to secure the aileron servo extension connections and setting the aileron servo horns so that they are parallel to the aileron hinge line.




The wing alignment pins are inserted into pre-drilled holes in the wing roots and secured in place with a drop or two of CA. The wing halves are removable, making the transport of the Yak 55M an easy proposition. Mounting the two wing halves to the fuselage involves inserting the wing spar tube into the tunnel-like pass-through in the fuselage and then securing the wing halves in place with the included knurled aluminum thumb screws. My two wing halves mounted to the fuselage perfectly, with all of the indexing pins slipping into their receiving holes and the knurled wing thumb screws easily threading into the blind nuts that are embedded in the wing halves.




Fuselage




The Yak-55M fuselage merits a few moments of thorough examination. It is a study in lightweight and strong composition. Keeping an airframe as light as possible is one of the key ingredients in the recipe for an aerobatic airplane that performs well. ElectriFly did their homework when designing the Yak fuselage! And as I would find out midway through my flight testing, the Yak fuselage is not lightweight at the expense of being strong. The canopy, cockpit and fore deck serve as a removable hatch, through which the battery can be inserted and removed and the receiver accessed for connecting the aileron servos whilst assembling the Yak in preparation for flight. This hatch has several pins at it's forward edge which index into the rear of the firewall, with the rear of this hatch getting locked in place via a strong magnetic latch. Assembly of the fuselage includes mounting the landing gear, making up the cockpit and assembling and mounting the cowl.

The Yak's landing gear comes out of the box nicely painted. Each main gear leg gets fastened to the fuselage with a triple set of Phillips head machine screws. Thread locking compound is recommended. ElectriFly includes fiberglass wheel spats that are an integral part of the real Yak 55's iconic appearance. They mount up to the main gear using several small screws, with the main gear axles passing through the middle of them as well. Once assembled, the main landing gear really look cool in my opinion! My anxiety to get the Yak finished and in the air began to build as I finished the landing gear installation!




The fiberglass cowl features several rows of louvers, another instantly recognizable detail of the full size Yak 55. ElectriFly did a nice job with the quality of the glass work in this kit. The layup is solid and the paint glossy, deep and rich. It is necessary to glue the silver colored, plastic circular louver assembly to the forward interior of the fiberglass cowl. A hole must be created in the center of this plastic piece, for the motor shaft to protrude through.



The entire cowl assembly is then held to the front of the fuselage with a series of implanted magnets on the firewall and thin ply ring that is factory glued to the aft, inside edge of the fiberglass cowl. I was a little dismayed and surprised to find that my firewall lacked the magnets required to properly secure the cowl assembly. The small holes that should have held the other set of mating magnets were all empty! I ended up using some magnets that I had on hand, though they were slightly larger and required careful enlarging of the factory holes. The end result was a cowl that did not snap tightly in place to my satisfaction. I would later decide to use a piece of Blenderm tape to act as the ultimate guarantee that my cowl was safely secure and not prone to be jostled loose in flight.



The cockpit must be "created" in that a black floor gets glued into the canopy/hatch assembly. A pilot is not included but if you wish to install one, it should be done as the cockpit floor is glued in place. I decided to use Blenderm tape to hold the cockpit floor in place, which decision comes with the benefit of being able to easily regain access to the cockpit for a pilot swap-out! I started with a female pilot figure that I had on hand but would later swap her out for a more appropriately sized male pilot that I ordered from Tower Hobbies. ElectriFly includes a cockpit instrument cluster decal to help create a more scale looking cockpit.



An exit hole through which the all important electronics cooling airflow can exit needs to be cut in the underbelly of the aft section of the fuselage. There is an oval-ish opening cut into the underlying wood structure; a sharp hobby blade makes this cut easily and cleanly. The dark blue color of the covering helps conceal this hole


Tail

Assembling the tail on the Yak 55M takes half as long as other many other kits, mainly because the vertical stabilizer is part of the fuselage and already attached to it. All that remains is to attach the horizontal stabilizer, the elevator, the rudder and the tail wheel assembly. And it is best to do it in that order! The elevator joiner rod gets inserted through the vertical stabilizer BEFORE the elevator hinges are glued in place. It is important to dry fit the twin elevators first before permanently gluing them in place. Doing this verifies that the bends in the elevator joiner are square and that the elevators will be perfectly parallel to one another. A wedge shaped piece of covering has already been removed from the horizontal stabilizer in preparation for gluing it to the fuselage. I used 5 minute epoxy.






Once the horizontal stabilizer and elevators are in place, the tail wheel assembly and rudder can be assembled and attached. I really like the rounded outline of the vertical stabilizer assembly! The entire completed empennage is as sexy looking as a model can be!


Radio Installation

I used a Futaba R617FS 2.4 GHz FASST 7 channel receiver, in conjunction with my Futaba T10CAP 2.4GHz transmitter, as the radio system for this review project. Having a few extra channels available allows me to plug each aileron servo into it's own channel, which makes for easier setup of the individual control surfaces in the transmitter. When assembling the airframe in preparation for flying, the aileron servos will need plugged into the receiver. I always mark my servo leads clearly to minimize the chances of plugging a control surface into the wrong channel during a moment of inattention. The inside of the fuselage has ample room for mounting a receiver but I went with the recommended position, to the rear of the long battery mounting tray just under the wing spar tube. The elevator and rudder servos are mounted in servo cut-outs at the rear of the fuselage. This makes for short push rod connections to the tail control surfaces. The covering must be cut away from these servo cut-outs and the servos are then mounted in the same fashion as the aileron servos. Using longer servo arms will allow one to hit the factory recommended 3D control rates.



Power System Installation

The recommended Rimfire .32 sized brushless outrunner and 45 amp speed controller mount to the front end of the fuselage. The mounting holes for the Rimfire's X mount are pre-drilled in the firewall. Thread lock compound should be used to ensure that the mounting screws stay tight during flight. I attached the ESC to the sidewall of the wood motor mount structure using a couple stripes of hot glue, though the assembly manual recommends hook and loop material. A short servo extension is required to bridge the gap from the end of the ESC radio connection wire to the receiver. After a quick trip across my Dubro prop balancer, the APC E 12x6 prop was ready for mounting. ElectriFly includes a plastic, white prop spinner in the box.




The ElectriFly 4S 2250mAh lipo is held to the battery tray using both surface mount hook and loop material and a wrap-around hook and loop strap. There is ample space length-wise on the battery tray to permit shifting the battery forward and aft for CG adjustment. Powering up the brushless power system for the first time, I was excited to find that the propeller spins in the same counter-clockwise direction as the full size Yak 55!! Of course we all know that it is normal for our electric power systems to spin the prop CCW but I nonetheless thought it cool that the direction of prop rotation was actually accurate in a scale sense.


Completion

The final pages of the assembly manual cover decal placement, control throw settings and center of gravity verification. The included sheet of Yak decals coordinate nicely with the three color Monokote covering scheme. My Yak came in at 3 pounds 9 ounces ready to fly, which is in line with the manufacturers specified weight of 3.5 to 3.75 pounds.




Recommended Control Throws
Low Rates High Rates 3D Rates
Elevator 5/16" (8mm) 5/8" (16mm) 1-7/8" (48mm)
Ailerons 1/2" (13mm) 3/4" (19mm) 1-3/4" (44mm)
Rudder 1-3/4" (44mm) 2-1/8" (54mm) 2-1/2" (64mm)

ElectriFly provides three sets of control surface throws: low, high and 3D. Exponential settings are left up to the personal taste of each pilot, though ElectriFly does offer some food for thought on what exponential settings may be useful on this model. I like to use 30% to 40% on low and high rates. I typically bump the 3D exponential up to 50%. The recommended center of gravity is 97mm (+/- 9.5mm) from the leading edge of the wing at the fuselage. I ended up placing the ElectriFly lipo near the aft end of the battery tray to place my Yak in the recommended range. It is a very good idea to verify the lateral balance as well, and adjust if necessary. Aerobatic models will especially benefit from good lateral balance.

It is my tradition when building a new model to take the completed project out on the street in front of my house for a static photo session. I also place the plane in a foam cradle and do a preliminary radio range check, which is followed up by another site specific range check at whatever flying site I end up flying the model at. I was excited to shoot some photos of the assembled Yak 55M, as I was attracted to it's svelte lines from the very first moment that I laid eyes upon it. Shooting the photos only increased those feelings, and made me excited to get it up in the air ASAP!




Flying

Taking Off and Landing

The moment of truth arrived and I was ever so excited to see the Yak take to the air for the first time. Though the real Yak 55M is known for it's excellent thrust to weight ratio, I knew my 51" wingspan Yak would have an even more extreme thrust to weight ratio. Having such performance potential under the hood, takeoffs can be performed in a very unscale-like rocket ship type vertical "launch". Resisting the urge to do that on the maiden takeoff, I switched to high rates and slowly advanced the throttle, using the rudder to keep the Yak pointed into the wind until it slowly rose from the ground and climbed heavenward. With just a few clicks of trim, the Yak was stable and ready for some real flying. .



The alternate style of takeoff involves just jamming the throttle stick full to the stop and grabbing a bunch of up elevator. The ElectriFly Yak 55M performs this move effortlessly and onlookers usually enjoy this style of takeoff much more than the scale takeoffs that I prefer. Either way, the Yak looks great when it rolls out and leaves the ground

Landing the Yak 55M involves flying the high performance aerobatic model all the way to the ground. This model retains energy well. Less experienced pilots may become acclimated to pulling the power back to an idle, or even killing it completely, as they come down the final part of the glide-slope and cross the runway threshold. Models like the Yak will continue to respond, and respond well, to elevator input all the way up to the point where the airfoil stalls. Landing the Yak is not difficult at all but using the throttle instead of the elevator to control descent on final is imperative. This technique, when properly applied to the Yak, will result in some of the nicest looking three point landings that you will ever see. I like to idle her down the glide-slope and then start feeding in imperceptibly small amounts of up elevator as I cross the threshold. The Yak will respond by slowly raising it's nose and losing airspeed. Once I am less than a foot over the runway, I pull the power back and let the airframe lightly settle to the ground.



Aerobatics/Special Flight Performance

The Yak is listed as a sport/aerobatic airframe, one that though compact flies like a much larger model. I categorize myself as a sport pilot/wannabe aerobatic phenom. Though my aged thumbs may not have the prowess and ability of many younger pilots, I really enjoy flying an aerobatic model like the Yak. Once I had logged a flight or two on my Yak, I pretty much left the three way rates switch set to the 3D setting. The Yak is an aerobatic tour de force and will respond to your control inputs immediately and then some. Using the Futaba digital servos over the less expensive and specification-wise slightly inferior non-digital servos no doubt contributes to this "good feeling"! Though I will never be asked to attend the Aerobatic Shootout, I have a ton of fun ripping around the skies performing all of the aerobatic maneuvers I can muster. With me at the sticks, the Yak is like a world class roping horse with a beginning rider on it's back. It easily executes everything that I ask of it and then patiently awaits the moment when I REALLY come up with something challenging for it to do! The Yak looks fantastic in knife edge flight and has an abundance of power and rudder throw to stay there all day, or at least until the battery cries uncle. Inverted flight is super stable and I was instantly comfortable flying repeated circuits "upside down". Obviously, this model is designed to be capable of any and all aerobatics. If confined to using but one word to describe the way it flies, I would sum it up with the word P-R-E-C-I-S-E. Tell the Yak to roll and it will. Ask it to stop rolling and it already has. Any who enjoy performing aerobatics, and perhaps even competing in them, will certainly enjoy the way this "small" plane flies like a much larger one.




Is This For a Beginner?

Aerobatic models of this breed are beyond the abilities of most beginners. These aircraft must be flown 100% of the time and possess almost no self-righting abilities. On high or 3D rates, the quick response and sensitivity of the model would instantly overwhelm a beginner. Additionally, the lightweight composition of the airframe would not stand up to the constant abuse normally dealt out by beginning pilots. However, the Yak is an aircraft that can even be enjoyed by those of us who are not advanced or extreme aerobatic pilots. Whether you enjoy flying sport aerobatics or competition level aerobatics, the ElectriFly Yak will be of interest to you.

Flight Video/Photo Gallery





Conclusion

I am loving this latest offering in ElectriFly's continuing series of E Performance aerobats. From the cool scale details to the rounded vertical stabilizer and rudder, to the wheel spats ... the Yak 55m is quite the snappy looking model. I usually judge the real value of a plane in my hangar by whether I would buy another should something bad suddenly happen to it. I enjoy the Yak so much that I am thinking I should buy a spare one NOW, so that if something unexpected should happen to the one I am flying now, I would not have to wait very long to have another in service! The one slight bump in what is normally a very smooth trip down ElectriFly Boulevard was the missing cowl retention magnets in the firewall. In my years of experience building models, Great Planes and ElectriFly kits have seldom had any issues like that. I was a little surprised to see the magnets missing but the inconvenience caused was minor and easily remedied on my own. I had one notable experience while flying the Yak for media gathering purposes. I will tell on myself and share it with you here. I knew after building the Yak that the cool looking wheel spats would be vulnerable to less than perfect landings. I mentally assured myself that my landing abilities were advanced enough that I would have NO problem keeping them in tip top shape. However, I did have one particularly acute senior moment where I suffered a serious lapse in depth perception that literally vaporized the spats! I was preparing to do a high speed, low pass down the center line of the runway. As I turned base to final, I rolled the Yak level to arrest the diving descent that I had established in the steep turn. I quickly found out that I was a little lower than I thought. The Yak slammed into the concrete hard and then bounced right back into the air. I saw the little blue pieces fly! I continued flying the pass and then set up for a quick landing, absolutely sure that my error must have damaged the lightweight fuselage in the area where the landing gear attaches. I was completely blown away and impressed to the max when I saw that the only damage that my clueless moment had caused was one set of destroyed spats. The point in this lengthy story is that, though the fuselage is designed to be lightweight, I am here to tell you that it is NOT at the expense of being strong!




Likes:

  • Airframe is amazingly light and yet incredibly strong
  • 51" wingspan airplane that handles like a much larger aircraft (can you say PRECISE
  • High quality fiberglass parts, with premium paint finish
  • Cool scale Yak 55 details such as louvers, wheel spats and bubble canopy are nicely captured
  • Prop spins counter-clockwise just like the full scale Yak 55m!

Dislikes:

  • Firewall missing the cowl assembly mating retention magnets


Last edited by Bajora; May 26, 2011 at 06:16 PM..

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Old May 27, 2011, 09:36 AM
I have no friends
United States, MI, Holland
Joined Dec 1996
3,376 Posts
What is the flight time on the setup reviewed?
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Old May 27, 2011, 10:05 AM
KK6MQJ
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Joined Sep 2004
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4 to 5 minutes of spirited flying...but your mileage can, and probably will vary depending on your use of throttle.
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Old May 27, 2011, 05:41 PM
ProBro Eric in Jax
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United States, FL
Joined Mar 2006
207 Posts
Great Review!


I mostly fly 3D but I love all Yaks and this 55m is by far the best looking 55 to date, I had to have it. Mine is rigged with ValueHobby Gforce .32 Hobbywing ESC and PowerHD servos. I use 4s 2250 pack and get about 6 minute of throttle manged flight.
This is by no means a 3d machine, but it does fly like it's on rails. I can't belive how well this plane tracks in the air. Mine balanced well with the pack to the rear of the tray against the tube and is just a bit off neutral inverted.

Fit and Finish = 10
Flight Performance = 10

Thanks for the review

Eric.
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Last edited by p0stal; May 27, 2011 at 10:06 PM.
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Old May 28, 2011, 06:41 PM
Cant fly enough
Greg Beshouri's Avatar
USA, CA, Berkeley
Joined Dec 2003
1,833 Posts
Hi Jon,

Great review and video as always. It looks uber stable and precise. My 3DHS Aspera is slowly falling apart. I have been waiting for the smaller Osiris but this could be a contender.

Either way I am jealous as always!

Greg

PS: In the blue box in the upper right it says 3S not 4S. Just happened to catch my eye.
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Old May 28, 2011, 08:45 PM
KK6MQJ
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Joined Sep 2004
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Alright Greg, that's it. I want to PAY you to proofread for me!

No matter how many times I go over it before turning it in, seems I always leave at least one mistake in there. But thanks for catching that typo for me.
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Old May 28, 2011, 09:00 PM
Cant fly enough
Greg Beshouri's Avatar
USA, CA, Berkeley
Joined Dec 2003
1,833 Posts
Don't feel bad Jon.

We just turned a 100 page application in to the EPA. It was reviewed by everyone! There were still errors....

It is the nature of the beast.

Still having a third party review always helps. I would be happy to do it. For FREE!

Greg
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Old Jun 03, 2011, 10:49 AM
Fly it like U stole it
Pickle72's Avatar
Champaign, Il
Joined Mar 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by p0stal View Post
Great Review!


I mostly fly 3D but I love all Yaks and this 55m is by far the best looking 55 to date, I had to have it. Mine is rigged with ValueHobby Gforce .32 Hobbywing ESC and PowerHD servos. I use 4s 2250 pack and get about 6 minute of throttle manged flight.
This is by no means a 3d machine, but it does fly like it's on rails. I can't belive how well this plane tracks in the air. Mine balanced well with the pack to the rear of the tray against the tube and is just a bit off neutral inverted.

Fit and Finish = 10
Flight Performance = 10

Thanks for the review

Eric.
Which PowerHD servos did you use? And how are they holding up?

Thanks
Matt
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Old Jun 03, 2011, 05:35 PM
Registered User
USA, KY, Lexington
Joined Dec 2007
640 Posts
I've had this plane for about 4 months now and absolutely love it.

I went with the Rimfire 32 and 4S 2200mah 40C batteries. I'm flying a 12x8 prop for a little more speed. I still have unlimited vertical.

A couple of observations. Don't plan on using anything larger than a 4S 2200 size battery. I started out with 3300mah and it weighed the plane down too much. The landing gear box is a weak point and the larger battery will stress it too much. I've already repaired mine twice but haven't had any issues since going with a 2200 size pack.

I can get 7 minutes of mixed flying out mine which is fine by me.

Oh and the canopy will crack if you look at it the wrong way. It's very very very fragile and light. The rear section especially is brittle. Take care when sliding the canopy on.

I had issues with my cowl magnets as well. Mine didn't line up correctly and my cowl would get sucked into my prop when doing a knife edge. I ditched the magents all together and just put a couple of servo screws into it to hold it in place and haven't had any issues at all.

Overall it's an awesome plane. I don't fly 3D but this thing has a stupid fast roll rate and it's very axial as well.

If I have a tiny bit of head wind I can easily deadstick this thing in for a nice landing.
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Old Jun 03, 2011, 06:16 PM
ProBro Eric in Jax
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United States, FL
Joined Mar 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pickle72 View Post
Which PowerHD servos did you use? And how are they holding up?

Thanks
Matt
HD 1711MG

They hold up just fine.
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Old Jun 14, 2011, 10:23 PM
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Great review. Thanks.
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Old Jun 14, 2011, 10:37 PM
KK6MQJ
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Thanks for giving it a read Tony! And thanks for posting up too.
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Old Jun 15, 2011, 01:30 PM
Visitor from Reality
United States, VA, Arlington
Joined Dec 1996
12,788 Posts
Though I seldom do ready-mades, the YAK series are attractive to me and I'm idly pondering this as a winter project, assuming its still around when I have the time. When many similar models are more like cartoon scale, this one captures the look of the YAK series well.

Points that come to mind - I even alter my own designs and have a pink low winged 'Sweet'n'Low Stik' that started as a red and white high winged Ugly Stik clone, I think I have the aeromodelling skills to manage these slight alterations

One - the UC mount weakness. Would it be hard to get in there through the existing structure and cure that issue? I fly off your typically lumpy grass runways and prefer to take UC and model home like they started.

Two - the servo mounts. Yes, it's cheaper to make this sort of model with the servos hanging out in the breeze, chewing up the airflow and having servo output and control horn at ninety degrees to each other. My thoughts lean to putting the ailerons servos inside the wing, and putting the servo arms and aileron horns into the same plane of movement. Move the fuselage servos up to the receiver bay and run well secured Sullivan Goldenrod controls to the elevator and rudder, or perhaps a lightweight closed loop rudder control?

As it's from Tower Hobbies, hopefully, it's Monokote covering which will match the existing finish?

Three - Have an E Flite Power 32. It appears to have a similar electronic spec to the test model's .32 motor, but am wondering if my E Flite would match the phyical mounts as already fitted, or if they'd be adaptable.

Thank you in advance

Dereck
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Last edited by Dereck; Jun 15, 2011 at 01:36 PM.
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Old Jun 15, 2011, 05:34 PM
ProBro Eric in Jax
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United States, FL
Joined Mar 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dereck View Post
Though I seldom do ready-mades, the YAK series are attractive to me and I'm idly pondering this as a winter project, assuming its still around when I have the time. When many similar models are more like cartoon scale, this one captures the look of the YAK series well.

Points that come to mind - I even alter my own designs and have a pink low winged 'Sweet'n'Low Stik' that started as a red and white high winged Ugly Stik clone, I think I have the aeromodelling skills to manage these slight alterations

One - the UC mount weakness. Would it be hard to get in there through the existing structure and cure that issue? I fly off your typically lumpy grass runways and prefer to take UC and model home like they started.

Two - the servo mounts. Yes, it's cheaper to make this sort of model with the servos hanging out in the breeze, chewing up the airflow and having servo output and control horn at ninety degrees to each other. My thoughts lean to putting the ailerons servos inside the wing, and putting the servo arms and aileron horns into the same plane of movement. Move the fuselage servos up to the receiver bay and run well secured Sullivan Goldenrod controls to the elevator and rudder, or perhaps a lightweight closed loop rudder control?

As it's from Tower Hobbies, hopefully, it's Monokote covering which will match the existing finish?

Three - Have an E Flite Power 32. It appears to have a similar electronic spec to the test model's .32 motor, but am wondering if my E Flite would match the phyical mounts as already fitted, or if they'd be adaptable.

Thank you in advance

Dereck


Wow!
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Old Jun 15, 2011, 05:56 PM
KK6MQJ
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Dereck....

Though one post above did mention a perceived weakness in the UC, I did not find my experience to be the same. To the contrary, I even slam dunked mine (accidentally of course!) into a paved runway, with no damage to the UC. The wheels spats were both obliterated however. As I mentioned in the review, the covering is Monokote. The Power 32 would be a comparable motor for sure but the more critical dimension IMO would be the depth of the motor. You can always drill new mounting holes but if the motor is not the same depth as the Rimfire, you will have to stand it off or, if it is deeper, er, I guess mod the motor box or firewall?

Good luck with the other mods you spoke of and share photos here if you'd like.
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