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Old Feb 17, 2011, 04:45 PM
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This completes the first coat of resin being applied to the hull. Block sand all of the overlaps of resin on the hull with a quick sanding with 80 grit sand paper and the entire hull with 180 grit sandpaper. Dust off the hull and start the entire process of taping out with masking tape and newspaper for a second and third coat of finishing resin.

The second and third coats of the finishing resin will be thinned out with only 1/2 cap of the Xylene thinner per batch of resin, per side of the hull being coated in. Do not forget to coat the hatches, dashboard, and the cockpit trim boards for their second and third coats of resin at the same time as the hull. This procedure is time consuming, but it does eliminate the worries of having to sand out runs of the hardened resin on the hull.

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Old Feb 17, 2011, 04:49 PM
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After coating the hull with the three coats of the finishing resin, the entire hull, hatches, dashboard and cockpit trim boards must be block sanded smooth. Start the block sanding with the 80 grit sandpaper for the over laps of resin, then move to 120 grit, then 180 grit, to get a smooth fully sanded surface, with no hollows or holidays (un-sanded surfaces) showing.

At this point we can mark out for the water line on the hull. Measuring down the stem post from the surface of the deck, place a pencil mark at 4 19/32”. At the corner of each side of the transom, measuring up from the bottom surface of the hull place a pencil mark at 3/4”. With the hull sitting on the boat stand tape it down to the stand so the hull will not move on the stand. Now on a flat surface, measure the distance from the surface to the water line pencil marks at the stem post and then the marks at both corners of the transom. You will have to shim under the feet of the boat stand until all the marks are the same distance from the flat surface. If you have a height gage, tape a pencil to the adjustable arm of the gage. You can make a height gage of sorts by taking a box and taping a pencil to the side of the box so that the pencil point in at the height of one of the marks on the boat hull. Now slide the height gage or the box around the hull with the pencil point marking the water line all the way around the hull.

Make sure that the boat, stand, and the shims DO NOT MOVE while marking out the water line.
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Old Feb 17, 2011, 05:17 PM
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Once the water line has been marked around the hull, carefully mask out the sides and transom of the hull above the water line with painters tape.
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Old Feb 17, 2011, 05:23 PM
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Turn the hull upside down and finish masking out the sides, transom, and deck of the hull with masking tape and newspaper in preparation of the primer coat of paint to be applied to the bottom.

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Old Feb 17, 2011, 05:26 PM
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We sprayed the bottom of the hull with “Dupli-Color” gray filler primer #FP101, three good wet coats of paint with the paint allow to set up for about 10 minutes between coats. Once sprayed, leave the paint set up for two hours and then remove the masking tape and newspaper. Now leave the hull up side down to dry out for 4 or 5 days before handling the hull.

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Old Feb 17, 2011, 05:30 PM
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At this point in the build we set aside the sanded hull and parts to let the resin full cure before proceeding with the polyurethane build up for finish. We proceeded to make other sub assemblies during this time.

From laser sheet S4 remove all the parts. From laser sheet S1 remove the seat splicer (SS). From laser sheet S2 remove the cockpit side left (CSL) and right (CSR). All of the lite plywood parts must be coated on both sides, one side at a time, with thinned penetrating epoxy finishing resin, before any assembly can be begun. Once the resin has hardened, sand the surfaces with 180 grit sand paper in preparation to be primed with the spray primer.

Also at this time remove the seat parts form laser sheets S12 and S13. We will begin the assembly with the gluing of the laser etched seat back (3/8” thick balsa) over the mating 1/4” thick balsa seat back. Do the same procedure with the laser etched seat bottom with the 3/8” balsa being glued over the mating 1/4” balsa seat bottom. The gluing can be done with the medium CA glue.

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Old Feb 17, 2011, 05:34 PM
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Once the seat back and bottom are glued, take a hack saw blade and score the seat back and the seat bottom where the welting lines are laser etched on the balsa wood for about 1/8” deep score. Carry the score line up over the top and under the bottom of the seat back to the back of the balsa, scoring for about 1” in from the top and bottom of the seat’s back. Do the same with the seat bottom, continuing the score lines around the front and back of the seat bottom to the back side for about 1” in from the front and back of the bottom.

Using a block sander with 80 grit sand paper, contour sand the shapes for the seat back and the seat bottom cushions. See DWG #9.

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Old Feb 17, 2011, 05:38 PM
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The ends of the cushions must be rounded as if the upholstery was pulled tight over the padding and under the seat cushions. Once the general shape of the cushions has been roughed sanded, finish sand the cushions with 180 grit sand paper. With a piece of the 180 grit paper folded sand the welting lines with a little radius on each side of the score line. Using 4 straight pins as legs in the bottom of the bottom cushion and in the back of the seat back cushion, we can now mix a batch of penetrating epoxy finishing resin, and coat the seat cushions, both the bottom and back.
After the penetrating resin has dried, a second coat of resin thinned with only a third of a cap of thinner can be applied to the seat cushions. Once the resin has set up hard, sand with 180 grit sand paper to smooth finish and ready for primmer. Proceed to prime the seats with the spray primer. As was done with the bottom of the hull, apply three wet coats of primer about 10 minutes apart to avoid runs. Set the cushions aside to thoroughly dry and wait final finishing later in the build.

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Old Feb 17, 2011, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by frankg View Post
The first coats of finish will be of epoxy finishing resin (Z-Poxy by Pacer), thinned out with a couple of caps full of Xylene thinner. This thinned out epoxy will act as a penetrating resin and will lock in the final color of the stained wood.



The second and third coats of the finishing resin will be thinned out with only 1/2 cap of the Xylene thinner per batch of resin, per side of the hull being coated in.



Using 4 straight pins as legs in the bottom of the bottom cushion and in the back of the seat back cushion, we can now mix a batch of penetrating epoxy finishing resin, and coat the seat cushions, both the bottom and back.
After the penetrating resin has dried, a second coat of resin thinned with only a third of a cap of thinner can be applied to the seat cushions.

Can you be a little more specific on the ratio of Xylene to epoxy? The cap on my Xylene can holds 8 ML (CC) of Xylene; the mixing cups I use are marked up to 30 CC/ML in 5 CC increments. I use an eyedropper to transfer Xylene to my mixing cup of epoxy - makes each batch closer to the same ratio.

Earlier today I mixed up some thinned epoxy finishing resin to seal some wood parts on my tug; I mixed 10 ML of resin with 10 ML of hardener, and 2 ML of Xylene. For the first penetrating thin coating, usually go with 10 ML of resin, 10 ML of hardener, and 5 ML of Xylene.
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Old Feb 18, 2011, 06:27 AM
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Now leave the hull up side down to dry out for 4 or 5 days before handling the hull.
I hope this doesn't mean we have to wait four or five days to see more progress on the hull...
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Old Feb 18, 2011, 08:27 AM
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C.G.BOB-First I must state that I use only the Z-Poxy resins from Pacer, the same company that makes the CA glues that I use, so I can only speak from what I have done and know to be true. Different epoxy resins are made with different formulas and may react differently. When I mix the finishing resin I mix enough , (usually a little more than is needed ) to coat in the area I am going to do at the 50/50 mix of the two parts. The Xylene thinner I use is added for a penetrating mix, or thinned to the consistency of a little thicker than water. This allows the mixture to soak right into the balsa making it not only stronger but water proof.

When mixing for the build up coats of epoxy I literally only add one half cap or so of the Xylene after the 50/50 mix to break the surface tension of the epoxy so that trapped or suspended air in the mix can escape, leaving a good solid coat in the finish coat.

Believe me when I say this works and I have used this process for quite some time while building mahogany scale models. There has been no ill effects to the strength of the epoxy or in its drying ability. You will notice this in the epoxy mixing cups that had the left over epoxy in them.

R.G.in Canada-As for the time I leave paint to set up, yes I do not try to handle the painted parts for at least a few days but this does not mean that you can’t move on to other jobs to be done in the instructions. This is not a race to the finish, but the way to a museum quality model in finish and performance.

We give you all the information at our disposal to help you to that end, we leave it to you to either use it or not. We are doing everything in our power for you to have exceptional satisfaction with our kits and hope to have you as repeat customers.
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Old Feb 18, 2011, 08:49 AM
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Upholstery welting is done with the red 22 gage solid wire supplied in the kit. The wire will be started at the back of the seat backs in the score lines and glued in place with medium CA glue. The wire will then be pulled tightly around the front of the cushion to the back of the cushion ending the scored line opposite the other end of the wire. Glue in place with medium CA# glue. Once the glue has hardened, cut the wire. Move to the second scored line on the seat back and follow the same procedure as the first and install the wire welting. Once all the welting wire ins installed on the seat back, take the thin CA glue and run a bead of glue along each side of the wire around the front of the cushion. This will lock the wire in position in the scored welt.

The welting for the bottom cushion is done in the same manner as the seat back , except that the welting will start and stop at the bottom of the cushion (pic06037)

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Old Feb 18, 2011, 08:52 AM
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Proceed to prime the seats one more time with the spray primer and set the cushions aside to thoroughly dry and wait final finishing later in the build.

The last seat part to be made is the seat riser and locator which are made from 3/16” x 1/2” x 5 1/2" bass wood and 3/16” x 1” dowel. First take the 3/16” x 1” dowel and by chucking it in an electric drill sand the ends to a blunt point on both ends. Next cut the dowel in half. Now take the Bass wood riser and draw a center line down the center of the 1/2” side. Measure in 3/4” in from each end of the riser and drill a 3/16” diameter hole for the locator pins. The pins are not installed at this time, but the riser block can be quick sealed by coating with thin CA glue and then wiped down quickly with a paper towel.

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Last edited by frankg; Feb 19, 2011 at 09:56 AM.
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Old Feb 18, 2011, 08:54 AM
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On the resin coated lite plywood parts for the interior which were coated earlier, all of the parts can be lightly sanded with 180 grit sand paper. The parts for the cockpit sides left and right (CSL, CSR) have to be taped out on the bottom to the laser etched lines running the length of the side boards.
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Old Feb 18, 2011, 09:02 AM
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The foot throttle petal can now be assembled with medium CA glue. DO NOT at this time install the foot throttle petal on to the kick board. The three kick board angle frames can be installed into the back of the kick board in their slots and glued in place with the medium CA glue. NOTE: When looking at the front of the kick board the foot throttle slot for the petal and the steering column hole will be to the right side of the kick board. See DWG #10 & #14

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