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Multiplex Fun Cub Review

What's in a name? Yeah, "Fun Cub"... flying ANY radio controlled plane is fun, right? No, this one absolutely earns the right to include the word F-U-N in it's title.

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Wing span: 55.1 in (1400mm)
Length: 38.6 in (980mm)
Weight: 40 oz (1130g)
Battery: 3S 2200mAh lipo
Motor: Himax HC3516-0840
ESC: Castle Creations Thunderbird 36
Distributed by: Multiplex Modelsport USA
Street Price: $119.99

Early in each calendar year, Multiplex announces it's new releases. Multiplex aficionados typically then watch several pages fly off the calendar as they wait for the new releases to become available in their local distribution channels. One of the new releases added to the product lineup in 2010 was the Fun Cub. Fast forward to January 2011. I spent a few moments chatting with Shawn Spiker of Hitec-Multiplex at the AMA show in Ontario, California. Shawn mentioned that the Fun Cub had been such a popular release for them that it had been difficult to keep any in stock all through the 2010 year! I finally managed to shake one loose from US inventory and excitedly received one for review late in December of 2010. While the name Fun Cub may at first may seem a mere platitude, read on to see why this couldn't be farther from the truth!

A Full Size Fun Cub?!

Before we dive into the actual review of the Multiplex Fun Cub, please allow me to digress. Some modelers may study the appearance of the Fun Cub and categorize it a cartoonish, non-scale Cub at best? However, I found it quite interesting to discover that some of the Super Cubs flown as bush planes in Alaska bear a striking resemblance to the Fun Cub, both in appearance and flight performance.




Super Cub owner and pilot Loni Habersetzer lives and flies in both Alaska and Washington State. He has over 10,000 hours in Supercubs, and over 23,000 off-airport takeoffs and landings logged. Take a peek at the amazing things Loni does with his full size Super Cub and I think you will agree that Multiplex definitely had a specific design intent in mind when bringing the Fun Cub to market. And like me, you may also find that Loni's flying really gets you "in the mood" to get out and have some cool adventures with your Fun Cub! Now, let's dive into the build of the Fun Cub!

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Images and video above from Cubdriver749er.com

Kit Contents

Each and every time I commence the build of a Multiplex model, I am amazed and impressed with the way they go about their business. Even the box hints at some careful thought and engineering for the way all of the components are snugly and safely nestled in the foam cradle block. Multiplex elevates their designs into a hybrid cross between a plastic model kit and a foam radio controlled kit, thanks to the plentiful plastic pieces included in the box. From offset flap hinges to a glider tow release mechanism to the method employed to make the wing not only removable but capable of being separated into two halves for transport, Multiplex really knows how to dress up a foam model. Speaking of foam, theirs is trademarked under the brand name Elapor. It is both resilient and repairable.



In The Box:

  • Elapor foam fuselage halves (2)
  • Elapor wing halves (2)
  • Elapor horizontal and vertical stabilizer assemblies
  • Elapor tires (3)
  • 40 page black and white, multi-language assembly manual
  • Colorful Multiplex decal sheets (2)
  • Wing joiner tubes (2), all required push rods
  • Aerotow mechanism
  • Large assortment of plastic parts, including hinges, control horns, wing joiner blocks, motor mount,etc
  • All required screws and fasteners











Required for Completion:

  • Minimum five channel radio system
  • Power system (motor, speed controller, propeller)
  • 3S 2250mAh lipoly battery
  • Lipoly charger



Provided for review:

  • Thunder Power G4 45C 3S 1750 lipoly battery
  • Recommended Fun Cub Power Pack
  • Hitec HS-81 (2) and HS-55 (4) servos







Assembly

Multiplex Fun Cub Online PDF Manual




When preparing to build this foam, er, Elapor, kit, there are a couple of essentials needed. First off, do NOT reach for your bottle of foam safe CA glue. It is not recommended for use on Elapor. Rather, Multiplex primarily recommends their own brand of CA adhesive. I have yet to ever see this particular brand of CA in any local hobby shop. I thus went with Zap medium viscosity CA, normally on the shelf at my local hobby shop. Another tool of necessity required when assembling a Multiplex kit is a moist and ready page turning finger. Multiplex configures their manuals so that the textual component of the instructions are in multiple languages. Towards the center of the manual is where the assembly illustrations are placed. The layout works but it necessitates an abundance of flipping back and forth between the illustrations and the text of your language of choice.

Fuselage

The Fun Cub fuselage comes out of the box in two halves. Assembling the fuselage involves installing the motor mounting pieces, the battery hatch retainer pieces and the plastic pieces into which the nylon wing retainer screws (2) thread. The design of the motor mounting system is such that the forces of the power system are mated to and spread out over several inches of each fuselage half. Thrust angles can be easily adjusted thanks to the four, small integral thrust angle adjustment screws. The rudder and elevator servos (HS-81s) are glued into pockets on the fuselage halves. I used a little CA on the mounting ears of these servos, as they fit quite snugly in the two pre-cut pockets.




The wing spreader plates serve as the attachment point for the two wing retainer nylon screws. They are glued in place as a part of the final mating of the two fuselage halves.



Another assembly step that can be grouped with the fuselage is the attaching of the main gear. Uniquely, the Fun Cub kit comes with oversize main gear that are made of Elapor. The appearance of the Fun Cub with these large gear make it look almost exactly like an Alaskan bush Super Cub. The smaller tail wheel is also made of Elapor.



The gear are attached to the under belly of the Fun Cub by means of a plastic landing gear plate. This plate has several spike shaped teeth that penetrate into the Elapor fuselage. I dry fitted this piece to the fuselage first. After removing the piece, I then worked some CA down into the openings made by the spike shaped pieces and pushed the landing gear mount back into place. A pre-formed, stiff wire is next snapped into place on the plastic landing gear mount and held in place with a single screw. The big Elapor gear are then sandwiched between a pair of wheel collars.




I had really hoped to garner a set of floats for the Fun Cub, to include as a part of this review. My continued attempts to shake a pair free from Multiplex/Hitec throughout the course of preparing this review resulted in the news that they were out of stock and unavailable.

Wing

The wingspan of the Fun Cub is not that large but with gas prices pushing four dollars a gallon here in the US, more and more folks are assuredly driving smaller cars, with their inherently smaller hauling capabilities. I have had to at times transport my planes to the flying field in a smallish sedan and getting more than a airframe or two stowed can be a real problem. Having said all of that, the wing of the Fun Cub is designed to be not only removable but it also easily breaks back down into two halves for transport. Two 27.5 inch wings are eminently more transportable than one larger 55 inch wing. The plastic pieces used to mate the two wing halves to one another are cleverly designed. And the wing features not just one but two spars.




One of the key features of the Fun Cub that definitely set it apart from an abundance of other available Cub models are the flaps. Though they are optional, Multiplex includes all of the hardware required to implement them. Much of the hardware is somewhat specialized. The flaps on the Fun Cub are enabled by cutting them completely free from the trailing edges of the wing halves. They are then reattached using the included offset hinges. The ailerons must also be cut free from the trailing edges of the wing halves, though only at their ends. The outer skin of the Elapor serves as the hinge material for the ailerons.






I was excited to get the flaps installed and connected, to see just how extremely they could be deployed thanks to the offset hinges. And boy can they be dropped! It is actually possible to extend them far enough below the wing so that they end up at a clean ninety degree angle to it! The control horns for the ailerons and flaps are also included in the box and are typical Multiplex engineering and quality.




After enabling the optional flaps, I could just picture the Fun Cub on a steep final approach with the flaps fully deployed!

Though I did not install it during my build, the Fun Cub comes with another cool little gadget sure to be useful to many enthusiasts in the hobby, especially if you fancy a regular flight or two with a sailplane. Yes, Multiplex includes an aerotow release in the box! For the cost of an additional servo, the Fun Cub can be transformed into a glider tow ship and used to haul sailplanes aloft. I do plan to use this feature this year as I begin work on a few other projects I have squirreled away on my shelf of dreams.


Tail

Assembly of the tail involves attaching the vertical and horizontal stabilizers, with their pre-hinged control surfaces already attached, to the rear of the fuselage. The tail wheel assembly is also assembled and attached as a sub step of this process. The foam pieces go together perfectly square and perpendicular, thanks to the self-aligning joints molded right into the foam. It is best to put your eye on it though, to insure it is all 100% correct, before finalizing it with CA adhesive.



The required 90 degree bend that must be made in the tail wheel wire by the builder takes the right tool and a little muscle to get it right. It is best to keep the actual bend as square and non-radiused as possible, so that it seats completely into place and out of sight in the Elapor foam rudder when installed. I found this step a little unclear and confusing at first but time spent studying the illustrative drawings included in the assembly manual eventually made it obvious as to how it needed to be done. The little Elapor tail wheel is held on the tail wheel wire using a couple small brass eyelet retainers held in place with a drop of CA. Just be careful that the CA does not find it's way to the plastic hub of the tail wheel!




Radio Installation and Programming



The servo requirements for the Fun Cub are modest indeed and will not break the bank. The four servos used in the wing for ailerons and flaps are the ever popular Hitec HS-55 sub micro 9g servos. The recommended rudder and elevator servos are the slightly beefier Hitec HS-81 servos. Before hot gluing the four wing servos in place, it is best to connect them to the receiver and verify that the horns are correctly oriented and that the control surfaces will be moving in the correct directions. This is especially true of the flaps. It is difficult to install the servo horn retainer screws once the servos are glued in place in their wing pockets, so it is best to get most of the servo setup completed before installing them. I selected the longer horns in order to make sure I could get enough throw on the flaps.


The HS-81s fit perfectly into the cutouts on the sides of the fuselage. I used a little CA, as recommended, to lock them into place. The flexible push rods supplied for the rudder and elevator linkages are uniquely of a three piece design, with each successively smaller diameter tube fitting inside one another. Out of necessity, I went with servo arms on the shorter side. Anything longer would not clear the sides of the box that the two servos fit down into.



I went with my faithful and much loved Multiplex EVO9 transmitter, paired with a Spektrum AR6200 six channel receiver. Thanks to an amazing RCGroups user named Shredz professionally engineered module, I was able to convert my EVO to Spektrum DSM. I have always loved the alternate approach to programming offered up by the Multiplex EVO transmitters.

I mounted the main receiver body, using a dab of hot glue, in the tunnel that connects the top of the fuselage-to-wing mating surface to the lower fuselage. I routed the satellite receiver down and under the tunnel and mounted it to the aft wall of the battery compartment. I decided to use a Y-harness to connect both ailerons to one single channel so that I could plug each flap servo into a dedicated channel. My main motive was so that I would be able to fine tune the flaps individually, which ultimately ended up being advantageous in getting the flap setup dialed in. Though I was jazzed to find that the flaps would deploy to a ninety degree angle, I went with a slightly more conservative setup and only utilized a full deployment value of approximately 70 degrees. My mid flap setting drops the flaps to a 40 degree setting.



Spektrum AR6200 Receiver Channel Mapping
Channel Function
1 Throttle
2 Ailerons (2 via Y harness)
3 Elevator
4 Rudder
5 Flap (Gear)
6 Flap (Aux)

Power System Installation

The recommended Power System for the Fun Cub comes with a Himax brushless outrunner, a Castle Creations Thunderbird 36 amp electronic speed controller and a APC 13x4 Thin Electric Prop. The amount of hardware included in plastic box with the Himax motor is amazing but the vast majority of it is not used when mounting the motor in the Fun Cub.



Multiplex includes a motor mount in the Fun Cub box. The Himax motor is mounted to it using four hex head cap screws. Once it is mated to the motor mount, the assembly is mounted to the two motor mount plates that were earlier mounted to the inside edges of the fuselage halves. The motor mount design is such that the thrust of the motor is almost infinitely adjustable via four small screws. The only part of the motor left protruding from the nose of the Fun Cub is the motor shaft. The 13X4 APC prop is attached via the collet spinner included with the Himax motor.




I used a little hot glue to mount the Castle Creations Thunderbird ESC to the fuselage wall, but only after first carving a little foam out of the fuselage wall to create a pocket into which the obtuse shape of the ESC could nestle.

Completion

The Fun Cub, when completed, was as white as a ghost with no decals applied. I thought I would go ahead and shoot some photos before applying the two sheets of decals however. I thought it manifested a certain curious and artsy simplicity in its unfinished state? Before starting on the brightly colored red and black Multiplex decal sheets, I grabbed a jar of silver gray paint and a couple different thicknesses of black Sharpie markers to try and make the engine cylinders stand out a little and also look authentic Cub.



Interestingly, the Fun Cub assembly manual lists the recommended CG as 80mm aft of the leading edge of the wing at the fuselage. This statement is then made: The CG location is not critical - 10 mm forward or aft of the stated position presents no problems. I was more than happy to read that line and interpreted it a bit on the liberal side. With the recommended lipo being a 3S 2200mAh class, I could not even really get close to that range, even if I positioned the battery as far to the rear as physically possible. Dropping to a Thunder Power G4 45C 3S 1750mAh lipo and placing it at the rear of the battery compartment ended up being the solution to this little anomaly. And as my plentiful review flights would eventually bear out, the CG was perfectly fine with this battery placement.

CG is 80mm (+/-10mm) aft of where the leading edge of the wing meets the fuselage



The assembly manual provides one specific set of recommended control throws and includes the caveat that if you intend to use the Fun Cub as a trainer aircraft, the throws should be dialed down to 50-60% of the stated values. No real suggestions are made as far as low or high rates. I decided to set up my low rates with a modest amount of throws and the high rates with an extreme amount of throws, with a smidgen of exponential dialed in all the way around because I turned 48 a few weeks ago!

Recommended Control Throws
UP DOWN
Elevator 35mm 22mm
UP DOWN
Ailerons 22mm 12mm
LEFT RIGHT
Rudder 25mm 25mm

With all of the radio programming completed and the CG and AUW checked and verified, all that remained to be done to finish the Fun Cub and have it ready for a maiden was to, er, as the manual words it: Gild the Lily! The manual encourages freedom of expression when applying the abundant decals but I went with a pretty conventional scheme and somewhat cloned the Fun Cub that was emblazoned on the box. Well, I did add a small RCGroups.com sticker to the corner of one flap, to show a little love to the site that makes these cool product reviews possible.

Flying

Taking Off and Landing

I cannot count the number of times that a reader has asked if I thought they could fly Airplane X off of their club's grass field. It has to be one of the most often asked questions in the review's discussion thread, and sadly, my opinionated answer more often than not is NO. But I am getting a little ahead of myself here ... more on this in a few sentences. The maiden flights of my Fun Cub took place when my family and I took a mid winter weekend vacation to what has to be our all time favorite beach destination. The weather was perfect, the winds mostly light and the Mutliplex Cub was just that: FUN!



I was a little surprised to find the the Himax motor suggested for the Cub is set up to get the Cub airborne in just a few feet, if that is your choice of take off styles. I had a grand time flying the Cub on the beach and learned early on in my flight testing that flying around with the flaps half deployed is especially fun. With a bit of a headwind, I could get the Fun Cub to hang almost motionless in the brilliant blue beach sky above me. Take offs and landings with half flaps are incredibly easy and occur at a very manageable airspeed. The big Elapor tires did an incredible job of getting up and over all sorts of obstructions on the beach. In fact, in all of my flying that weekend, I never had to retrieve the Cub due to it getting stuck on some obstacle.

Fast forward to the end of the short vacation and a return to the reality of day to day life, which included flying sessions at all of my normal fields. I was excited to take the Cub along for more outings and my next one would occur at a field with a concrete runway. I was a little taken aback when I suddenly could not make a decent landing to save my life! No matter how gently the big Elapor mains would contact the pavement, the Cub would bounce back into the air. And when I did finally manage to keep the tires stuck to the ground, the single wire landing gear setup would cause the Cub to ground loop or drag a wingtip almost every time.



Though I normally love the challenge of landing a particularly tricky model, I was a little upset at the Cub suddenly turning on me like this. In a moment of clarity, I decided to try to fly it off a nasty patch of untrimmed and rocky grass that ran perpendicular to the paved runway. Surprise, surprise! The Cub ate it up! We ended up taking turns shooting touch and gos off of that rough grass runway for a couple more batteries worth of fun.

So, returning to the thought embarked upon in the first paragraph in this section, I will answer the question sure to be asked by a reader or two of this article. Is the Fun Cub suitable for a grass runway, and a rough one at that? Emphatically YES! In fact, the Fun Cub absolutely loves flying off any runway of the non-paved sort and excels at it. This particular performance characteristic of the Fun Cub was the main reason that I thought it appropriate to compare it to the extreme bush pilot antics of the Alaskan tundra. It is designed to handle just about any rough landing field you can throw at it.



Aerobatics/Special Flight Performance



Oh, you might think that a high wing trainer looking plane like the Fun Cub is not capable of providing much fun in the way of extreme aerobatics but in my opinion, nothing could be farther from the truth! When equipped with the recommended Himax power set, the Fun Cub has an excellent power-to-weight ratio. It will take off in mere feet and go straight vertical to boot. Inverted flight is amazingly easy and fun! Knife edge flight is also within it's capability, as are most other aerobatics. I was even able to hold the Fun Cub in a 3d-ish hover on multiple occasions.




Is This For a Beginner?

Yes, YEs and YES!! It seems like all too many times when I come to this part of the review, I have to try and think of a polite reason that I cannot recommend the product for beginners. Well, I am actually thrilled to be able to say that I think the Fun Cub is a perfect plane for beginners. Granted, it is not a 3 channel model like many beginners start out with but it will fly slow enough that I am willing to bet that a beginner just may be able to earn his wings with this versatile model. To almost guarantee this occurring, a little assistance from a more experienced pilot on the first six or dozen flights is a worthy consideration. Such help will also hopefully keep the Fun Cub looking good and avoid beating it up too badly due to the normal abuse a beginner can bestow on a model. The Elapor foam is eminently repairable should it succumb to an attack from green thumbs. The real beauty of the Fun Cub in my opinion is that it's amazing and broad flight envelope is sure to satisfy beginners, intermediate and even many expert pilots. I would not categorize it as a boring ho-hum type of airplane at all. Rather, it possesses an expansive flight envelope that can take some time to fully explore.

In-Flight Media Gallery

Video #1: Fun Cub Maiden Flights on the Beach!








Video #2: Fun Cub Showing why it DESERVES the word FUN in it's Name!

Conclusion

At first glance, one might be disposed to pass the Multiplex Fun Cub off as just another high wing trainer type airplane or another in a seemingly never ending series of Cubs. To do so though would be a mistake in my opinion. I have had more fun flying the Fun Cub over the last few months than I would have thought possible! If you listen to the sound tracks of the two embedded videos, you will hear several instances of Don and I laughing as we fly the Fun Cub. It is the type of laughter that is spontaneous and sneaks up on you without warning when you are truly having fun. From the beach to the roughest patch of uneven, rock and debris strewn grass I can find, the Fun Cub is a blast! I am always on the lookout for a new flying site, and usually the first criteria is that it has a paved surface to fly from. The Fun Cub has me looking for just the opposite ... any small, rough, site that I would normally not even consider flying from but could prove to be a fun challenge to tackle with my Fun Cub. Yeah, just like Loni, the pilot of the real Super Cub in Alaska at the front end of this review. Kudos to Multiplex for providing a model that might initially appear to be another run of the mill trainer but in the end proves to be one of those rare airframes that actually reminds us of the FUN that comes with being in this hobby!

Likes:

  • Plenty of plastic parts take this foam kit to another level
  • Broad flight envelope and amazing aerobatic abilities
  • Wing breaks down into two halves, for transport in even a Smart Car (I theorize)
  • Cool barn door style flaps
  • Difficult to land on paved surfaces

Dislikes:

  • Takes a little time to adapt to the Multiplex style of assembly manual
  • Difficult to land on paved surfaces
  • No floats included for the review

NOTE: Yes, I know I listed "Difficult to land on paved surfaces" as both a like and dislike! I was at first a bit dismayed about that fact, until it ultimately helped me to grasp what must assuredly have been the design concept and intent behind the Fun Cub ... that there is a little CubDriver hidden deep inside all of us! Thanks Multiplex ... and thanks Loni!


Last edited by Angela H; Mar 19, 2011 at 05:28 PM..

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Old Mar 17, 2011, 06:55 PM
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stickybeatz's Avatar
USA, AZ, Phoenix
Joined Apr 2010
1,704 Posts
Great review! I love my fun cub! I've gone to flying it with floats on full time whether there's water around or not. Here's a vid

Onboard the Multiplex Fun Cub with Floats (5 min 33 sec)
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Old Mar 17, 2011, 09:13 PM
Mansell Models
N827TM's Avatar
United States, UT, Layton
Joined May 2004
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Great Airplane!! Here are my too sense about it. I can take it off with full flaps in a couple plane lengths!! It flies knife edge all day with coupling. Inverted pass are great too. I will take it up 400+ feet above my head on takeoff, Use full flaps and put the plane in a 90 degree dive and land at my feet. The plane will tip stall at fast walking pace with the flaps down. Requires rudder for slow flight turns. This airplane is a vertical rocket with my setup below. Makes it all the more fun!!

The minus points are the stock landing gear has too much play. It is best to change the landing gear out and put aluminum gear in place. The landing gear mod will fix the pavement issue. Also, the other mod was to back mount the motor. For any high power motor on this airframe if it is not back mounted there will be a lot of vibration.

My setup is.

Motor: Turnigy 35-42 1100KV 400+ Watts of power
Prop. 11X5.5 APC
ESC: Turnigy Plush 60 amp
Battery: 3S 2200mah
Servos: Emax Metal gear 12gram
Flight Time is 7 minutes

Tom
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Old Mar 17, 2011, 09:21 PM
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Tnx for sharing the float video. Cool that the first post included what I could not manage to make happen.

Tom .... I did read about many folks having vibration problems but I had absolutely none on mine, which again is all stock and using the recommended power set. And as I mentioned in the review .... yeah, pavement is a little tough to get the landings right on BUT the gear is great and works perfectly fine IMO if you find some gnarly, nasty turf or tundra to fly from!
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Old Mar 17, 2011, 09:42 PM
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United States, MI, Honor
Joined Dec 2005
5,119 Posts
Thanks for the review. I have looked at that Cub also. Looks like a great plane to add to the fleet.
Nice job on the review. Lots of work to do, all the images, all the writing.
Thanks again, Jon.
Conehead
Orrin Eldred
After watching Flying Wild Alaska, I understand the tires a lot more.
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 12:07 AM
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WOW!! Great Review.. Im convinced on buying one now..
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 02:01 AM
semper mitis
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Paducah, Kentucky
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Great review that has renewed my interest in Multiplex.
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 02:20 AM
Cheaper than botox
viper69's Avatar
Escondido California
Joined Oct 2006
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Awesome review. I am buying the cub, but with all the email traffic on power setups, I am a little confused. Do I go stock setup or something else?

I fly large scale aerobatic gas planes so of course I love power when I push the throttle. Will the stock setup get me there? It appears so from the videos. Am I missing something? Why doesn't everyone use the stock setup? Cheaper alternatives?

It would be cool to see some paint schemes too. I don't want mine to be boring white.

Thanks,
jv
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 07:57 AM
did a reversed Immelman..once.
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Joined Nov 2002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by viper69 View Post
Awesome review. I am buying the cub, but with all the email traffic on power setups, I am a little confused. Do I go stock setup or something else?

It would be cool to see some paint schemes too. I don't want mine to be boring white.

Thanks,
jv
jv,

MONSTER FunCub thread here:


http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1209004
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 08:16 AM
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http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/belie

What gives?
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 08:57 AM
KK6MQJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by viper69 View Post
Awesome review. I am buying the cub, but with all the email traffic on power setups, I am a little confused. Do I go stock setup or something else?

I fly large scale aerobatic gas planes so of course I love power when I push the throttle. Will the stock setup get me there? It appears so from the videos. Am I missing something? Why doesn't everyone use the stock setup? Cheaper alternatives?

It would be cool to see some paint schemes too. I don't want mine to be boring white.

Thanks,
jv
I am pretty sure you hit the nail on the with the phrase "cheaper alternatives"? The recommended power set is a very good fit IMO and provides as much power as I would ever need for this model. Lotsa folks love to overpower their models and while it may have some small advantages, it isn't always the best thing to do. Strictly my opinion of course. You can see in the videos how hard the stock motor pulls the Fun Cub vertically. It is a great fit and isn't THAT expensive IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by angelfood View Post
Well, at least I can tell that you really must have actually read the words in my review. And although it escapes me at the moment what word I must have intended to use in that paragraph, it is obviously not THAT one. Thanks for catching that. Maybe I will ask our editor to alter that a bit. What I was TRYING to say is that Multiplex puts some thought into their packaging.
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 09:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bajora View Post
I am pretty sure you hit the nail on the with the phrase "cheaper alternatives"? The recommended power set is a very good fit IMO and provides as much power as I would ever need for this model. Lotsa folks love to overpower their models and while it may have some small advantages, it isn't always the best thing to do. Strictly my opinion of course. You can see in the videos how hard the stock motor pulls the Fun Cub vertically. It is a great fit and isn't THAT expensive IMO.



Well, at least I can tell that you really must have actually read the words in my review. And although it escapes me at the moment what word I must have intended to use in that paragraph, it is obviously not THAT one. Thanks for catching that. Maybe I will ask our editor to alter that a bit. What I was TRYING to say is that Multiplex puts some thought into their packaging.
The article belies your intent.
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 09:18 AM
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Heh heh heh, how true!

A wordsmith I am not, that is for sure! J had better keep that online dictionary open in a window while writing in the future.
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bajora View Post
I am pretty sure you hit the nail on the with the phrase "cheaper alternatives"? The recommended power set is a very good fit IMO and provides as much power as I would ever need for this model. Lotsa folks love to overpower their models and while it may have some small advantages, it isn't always the best thing to do. Strictly my opinion of course. You can see in the videos how hard the stock motor pulls the Fun Cub vertically. It is a great fit and isn't THAT expensive IMO.
Thanks for your reply. I should also say that I don't intend to fly it at full throttle except in very rare instances. I want to see how slow it can fly actually and generally just tool around with flaps extended. The airplane has been on my radar for quite a while, but it is more expensive than many out there so I was holding off.... but it keeps popping back into focus.

Finally, I have to add that your photos are awesome. Your entire review is fantastic, but the photos make the review! I also write, but for a print R/C magazine and good quality photos are so difficult to get. If my wife could fly I would shoot the photos, but that isn't going to happen..

You have done a wonderful job on this, and you deserve a well earned thanks.
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Old Mar 18, 2011, 12:09 PM
Flutter-Bys are fun
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Joined Dec 2005
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I watched the videos the second time. Now I must say, if the first video was the maiden flight, it takes lots, I mean LOT'S of guts to take off, into or towards the Ocean. Now that is faith in not only the airframe and electronics and more guts than I would ever have.

Looks like the stock set up is really good, lots of power, looks pretty awesome. too bad about the floats.
Conehead
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