HobbyKing.com New Products Flash Sale
Reply
Thread Tools
Old Nov 14, 2010, 10:44 PM
Registered User
replayreb's Avatar
Oxford, MS
Joined Dec 2005
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by FPVSCRacer View Post
Very cool project! I too am trying to do a FPV Summit but haven't gotten the truck and equipment yet. I like the Tonka body it looks like it will fit the chassis very well but IMO I would get over the sentimentalness and cut out the undercarriage. It'll still look like a Tonka Monster but it looks like if you did that then you'd be able to drop the body down 3" or so. That would hide/ protect the motor and electronics and not look so goofy way up in the air. Not to mention remove lots of extra weight and give you a lower CG which will help with preventing rollovers. Then maybe you could see suspension from onboard. Would the Tonka body fit over sides of chassis if cut up? What is the width of the Summit chassis and inside dimension of Tonka body? Could you take a pic from above straight down to body on chassis so I could see? Will the GoProHD with pan/tilt fit inside nicely? Sorry if I offended, I like this idea. Keep up the good work.
No offense taken; I appreciate your interest I guess I overplayed the sentimentality part of it all...I really was just looking for the easiest way out to add a tough Jeep-style body to the Summit without having to manufacture one from scratch like Wobby and others have done and came up with the Tonka solution. I could cut out the metal plate/undercarriage from the bottom of the Tonka and hollow out some of the plastic interior out to fit over the motor and suspension. I taped the GoPro where I am going to mount it, hooked up the live video out to my TV and pushed the truck down to bottom out the chassis and you still can't see the suspension...only the outer edge of the tires. It would help the center of gravity to prevent rollover but I am not planning on driving very fast especially if it is prone to rollover. The truck really doesn't look as high to me in person as it does in the pictures but the way I am mounting the camera and electronics I can always go back and cut out the bottom of the Tonka to lower it without having to start over. I photoshopped some lines on the undercarriage of the Tonka where I could cut it and still not lose the ability to screw the roof of the truck to the body (the round circles are the 4 screw holes) which pinches the interior between the roof and body to keep it secure so it would work if I decide to do it later.
replayreb is offline Find More Posts by replayreb
Reply With Quote
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Old Nov 14, 2010, 11:16 PM
Registered User
replayreb's Avatar
Oxford, MS
Joined Dec 2005
494 Posts
I was out of town all weekend and I couldn't wait to get started on the camera mount when I got home tonight. I ordered two 12"x12" 0.090" 5052 aluminum sheets from MetalByTheInch.com per HariEdo's recommendation in his FPV Summit build blog and will use that for the GoPro's pan/tilt mount and mounting base. I didn't want to drill holes into the Tonka's interior to mount the camera if I could help it (not because of sentimentality ) because I wanted the entire camera mount to be easily removable and I figured a large aluminum base velcroed to the rear bed will actually make a stronger mounting point than a smaller mount bolted to the plastic. All I had time to do was make the base tonight because it was almost the kids' bedtime and I was making an awful racket in the garage cutting the sheet metal with the jig saw and banging it with a mallet so my wife made me stop for the night. lol Hopefully I will get more of it done tomorrow.
replayreb is offline Find More Posts by replayreb
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 15, 2010, 10:21 PM
Rubbin's Racin
FPVSCRacer's Avatar
USA, Murrieta, California
Joined Oct 2010
341 Posts
Looking good! I really like the aluminum work and can't wait to see how your pan/tilt comes along. It's cool you can remove the cage to get easy access to your equipment. I hope you don't mind but I like the idea of using the Tonka Truck so much that I have decided to do the same for my build. I found one new in box on ebay and it is now on the way along with a buttload of other FPV stuff. Oh, and a new Summit too The Tonka looks to be the same as the one your using but has a different cage and was a special edition Chevron service truck model. It even comes with 4 Chevron tire coupons that expired in 1978. I know some people will probably hate me but I plan to chop it all up to suit my needs.
FPVSCRacer is offline Find More Posts by FPVSCRacer
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 15, 2010, 11:44 PM
Registered User
replayreb's Avatar
Oxford, MS
Joined Dec 2005
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by FPVSCRacer View Post
Looking good! I really like the aluminum work and can't wait to see how your pan/tilt comes along. It's cool you can remove the cage to get easy access to your equipment. I hope you don't mind but I like the idea of using the Tonka Truck so much that I have decided to do the same for my build. I found one new in box on ebay and it is now on the way along with a buttload of other FPV stuff. Oh, and a new Summit too The Tonka looks to be the same as the one your using but has a different cage and was a special edition Chevron service truck model. It even comes with 4 Chevron tire coupons that expired in 1978. I know some people will probably hate me but I plan to chop it all up to suit my needs.
Great find! I was looking for a Tonka truck like that was made in 1982 I found on this Tonka historical site but I haven't been able to find one on eBay. That Chevron truck is the same truck but in a different color! That's awesome! With the roll cage instead of the roof you could mount the cam on a sailboat winch servo and look around 360 degrees!
replayreb is offline Find More Posts by replayreb
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 01:05 AM
Registered User
replayreb's Avatar
Oxford, MS
Joined Dec 2005
494 Posts
I made the pan/tilt mount today and it was tougher than I expected because I didn't want to cut the top of the seat off so I had very little clearance to fit a GoPro HD in there under the roof but I succeeded! The first problem I had was to figure out how to make the tilt mount where the 2.5mm 4-conductor live video out cable would clear the pan mount base when the camera tilted forward. I finally settled on making the pan mount base wider on that side and then looping the end back over the top and that worked. When I started bending the aluminum I was thinking that maybe I should have ordered thinner aluminum because it was difficult to make 90 degree bends with only hand tools but later that thicker aluminum was a blessing in disguise because I didn't have any room to fit nuts onto the ends of the screws where the servo arm mounted to the base of the pan mount because it would catch the tilt mount when the camera swung down so I was able to simply thread the screws directly into the aluminum through much smaller holes I had drilled and then ground off the ends with a dremel and sanded it down to a smooth finish. I cut up the loop side of some wide velcro I had in the garage to cushion the sides, back and floor of the tilt mount to make a snug fit for the GoPro and used a wide rubber band to hold it in place. I offset the mount so the pan servo spline is located directly under the lens of the GoPro so the panning motion would look more natural and that worked out great since I had to widen the mount on that side to accommodate the camera's video out cable so the combination of those two design choices helped to balance the mount. I also discovered that if I had centered the camera body over the servo spline instead of the lens I wouldn't have had enough clearance to clear the sides of the roof so it worked out perfectly.

For the pan servo I used I used a "FPV 180" metal gear servo I ordered from Hobby Wireless. I don't like mounting a heavy camera and metal pan/tilt mount directly to a such a small servo but it gets rave reviews from fellow FPV'ers so we'll see. The price was right

For the tilting motion I just stuck a leftover HS-81 servo from my EasyStar days on the back of the tilt mount with some Parma Pro Servo tape and used a Dubro Mini E/Z connector and some music wire for the linkage.

I pulled off the head of the GI Joe doll and had to cut off the very top of the torso right above the sternum so he could clear the pan/tilt mount and I had to hollow out a square out of his back so the pan servo would fit in there and allow him to recline all the way back in his seat. I want to look down and see my chest, not a headless driver! lol

I also made the side view mirror mounts today and that turned out to be the easiest thing I've done on this project. I just cut out two small strips of the leftover aluminum and drilled a large hole in one end large enough to fit tightly on the plastic roof mount pillar that goes all the way down through the body to the undercarriage where a screw secures it. There are only four screws holding the the three main pieces of the Tonka together: The roof, the interior and the body and this thing is tough as nails with only those 4 screws. Amazing design. No wonder they are still around. Anyway, I found two blind spot mirrors at AutoZone like the ones Wobby uses and stuck them on there with servo tape. They seem secure but if they starting getting knocked off when driving around I think I can drill a small hole through the top of the mirrors and bolt them directly to the aluminum mounts and that will solve that.

I've decided to use some servo extensions and relocate the Dragon Link radio receiver to the bed of the truck underneath the aluminum mounting base. That is the only drive component that is not waterproof on the Summit since it will not fit inside the Summit's waterproof receiver box. Moving it up higher will allow me to ford shallow water like the Summit is designed to do.

The hard part is over! I am just waiting to get my Futaba 9C back from the Futaba Repair Center. I had replaced the momentary Trainer switch with a 2-position toggle switch for my headtracker a long time ago and for some reason the switch stopped working. I say some reason but I know it is my soldering skills I got tired of messing with it and sent it off to Futaba for repair and it should be back next week.
replayreb is offline Find More Posts by replayreb
Last edited by replayreb; Nov 24, 2010 at 02:20 AM.
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 02:55 AM
Registered User
Old Blighty
Joined Apr 2010
1,687 Posts
I think the guy below could do with following this thread!

Attached my iPhone to a remote-controlled car and hit Record... enjoy the stunts! (4 min 59 sec)
Ian Davidson is offline Find More Posts by Ian Davidson
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 10:30 AM
Registered User
Levendis's Avatar
Hong Kong, Hong Kong Island, Central And Western District
Joined Jun 2008
497 Posts
replayreb,
Awesome update - good aluminium work - look forward to the testdrive!
Levendis is online now Find More Posts by Levendis
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 11:09 AM
USA: LakeGeorge, New York
USA
Joined May 2010
4,610 Posts
Looking great soo far....
that custome GoPro mount you made
is outstanding.....make sure you secure
it really well, b/c when WOT, it will
vibrate like madd......
.....great job..... I may get mine out,
but mine is not Snow/water resistant anymore....
rclab1 is offline Find More Posts by rclab1
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 01:19 PM
Rubbin's Racin
FPVSCRacer's Avatar
USA, Murrieta, California
Joined Oct 2010
341 Posts
Great work on the mount, seems to be coming along very quickly. I can't wait to see it in action. When you get to the point of installing the electronics could you post about your radio setup, like what channel you are using for each servo, radio settings, etc. I will be using a 9C also and want to know the best way to control the truck.
FPVSCRacer is offline Find More Posts by FPVSCRacer
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 01:25 PM
I LIKE WAFFLES....
SENTRY 62's Avatar
Powder Springs, GA
Joined Sep 2010
2,452 Posts
You should have used this car :



this doll :



and this chick...



No particular reason really - just sayin'


LOL
SENTRY 62 is offline Find More Posts by SENTRY 62
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 02:03 PM
Registered User
replayreb's Avatar
Oxford, MS
Joined Dec 2005
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by FPVSCRacer View Post
Great work on the mount, seems to be coming along very quickly. I can't wait to see it in action. When you get to the point of installing the electronics could you post about your radio setup, like what channel you are using for each servo, radio settings, etc. I will be using a 9C also and want to know the best way to control the truck.
I sure will. I installed the radio before I sent off my transmitter for repair so I can tell you right now it is easiest if you buy at least two servo Y-cables/splitters so you can hook up both steering servos to the aileron channel on the 9C and the two locking differential servos to one channel so all you have to do is flip one switch on the 9C to lock the differentials. I currently have each of them connected to their own channel with one switch locking the front differential and another one locking the rear but I would rather have them all on one switch in order to free up an extra channel. Also, if you plan on going through water or mud you will will want to use servo extension cables to relocate the RC receiver up higher in the truck because only Traxxas' micro receiver that comes with the Summit will fit in the waterproof receiver box. I put the throttle on the elevator channel on the right stick because it will automatically center to neutral and the steering on the same stick on the aileron channel. The camera tilt servo is hooked up to the throttle channel on the left stick and the pan on the rudder on the left stick. I hooked up the high/low gear shifting servo to channel 5 I think and assigned that to a toggle switch on the 9C so you can shift on the fly. If I remember anything else about my setup I will post it.
replayreb is offline Find More Posts by replayreb
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 16, 2010, 04:10 PM
Any excuse to fly
United States, FL, Clearwater
Joined Apr 2008
550 Posts
Sentry 62 , Very funny. I have a friend that looks like that and drives the same thing...lol
LHTPlane is offline Find More Posts by LHTPlane
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2010, 01:27 AM
Registered User
replayreb's Avatar
Oxford, MS
Joined Dec 2005
494 Posts
OK, major update...I lowered the Tonka body on the Summit! I actually liked the jacked-up, monster truck look of the Tonka with it simply bolted to the Summit but I was worried that I would not be able to go very fast on pavement without flipping and I want to be able to do a little bit of climbing over rocks and logs in the woods around my house so lowering the center of gravity and removing a little bit of weight was the main objective. I was nervous about cutting up the Tonka because I didn't want to cut too much or in the wrong place and compromise the integrity and strength of the Tonka body. I bought a little metal saw wheel for my Dremel because I break those cut-off wheels too easily. The metal one even looked a little flimsy but it handled the twists and turns just fine. I started by taking out the plastic interior and lying it on top of the Summit's chassis and tried to figure out exactly where it needed to be cut. It looked like only part of the front floorboard in front of the console needed to be removed but it was difficult to tell exactly where. I didn't want to just cut a big, oversized square and then have all kinds of dirt and mud getting in the passenger compartment and muddying up Barbie's shoes! I used a piece of aluminum foil to make a "mold" of the front part of the Summit's motor and transmission and then used that to trace on the bottom of the interior where it needed to be cut. I started by making small, conservative cuts and then I when I could see the motor and transmission poking through from the top it was very easy to see where to widen the cuts. The plastic in the Tonka is VERY forgiving. All I had to do was make a rough cut with the Dremel and then the nylon plastic was very easy to file and straighten using a wood rasp and metal file. I then cut off the bottom of the metal body leaving the mounting holes for the body and roof in place and I bolted everything back together to test the fit. I noticed the plastic was rubbing the top of the slipper clutch adjustment nut on the Summit's transmission so I had to take everything back off and cut a little notch for the nut so it could spin freely. I think it turned out very well even if I do say so myself!

I was a little worried about tire rub but that turned out not to be a problem. The way the bumpers of the Tonka lines up with the Summit's body mounts puts the Summit's front wheels just a little forward of the Tonka's front wheel wells so the tire turns on its axis around the ends of the front bumper when the suspension is completely bottomed out. This Tonka and Summit are a perfect match.

Before I lowered the body I noticed the back was starting to sag a little even with the retainer springs on the shocks pushed way out so I started investigating getting stiffer springs for the shocks and learned that the front springs on the RTR Summit are actually stiffer than the rear ones. Maybe that is why rear sag is so common on the Summit. Anyway, I swapped the shocks so the stiffer springs are now in the back and problem solved. From reading here on RCGroups I learned that I need to prop the chassis up on a block or something to keep the weight off the suspension when I store the truck so I found a 7"x7"x7" planter at Home Depot that is perfect. It is made of very soft plastic that gives a little so it really cradles the Summit and is stable enough for me to use it to keep the wheels off the ground so the Summit doesn't accidentally take off across the living room while programming the radio. I've already done that when I first started replacing the stock radio with the Dragon Link. I accidentally hooked up the ESC to the wrong channel and when I flipped a switch the Summit backed up over my wife's plant and took the top right off. Luckily we're still married.

My radio arrived back from repair today and I ordered one more servo Y-harness from Tower so I can lock the differentials with one switch instead of two. When I get that installed in the Summit's receiver box I can finally bolt the body on for good and leave it. Speaking of which, I finally sat down with some wire markers and labelled all of the servo connectors on the Summit and servo extensions so if I have to pull everything apart I don't have to try to figure out which servo connects to what. I drilled a hole in the top of the Summit's receiver box and ran the servo extensions through wire loom and drilled a hole in the plastic bed of the Tonka for it to poke through. That's where I'm going to put the RC receiver where it will be protected by the aluminum base of the camera mount.

I ran across some tan colored cable ties by accident while at the hardware store and thought they would make cool seatbelts so Barbie and GI Joe are now securely buckled into their seats!

The only thing really left to do besides programming the radio is to get a hard hat or welding headgear like Wobby has and bolt a Lipo and my 1.2GHz receiver to it for my Fat Sharks so it will be all-in-one and easily transported. The receiver is powered by 12V but the FatSharks take 7.4V so I was planning to use a UBEC so I could power the FatSharks from a 3S lipo but I learned from Tim at ReadyMadeRC.com that the FatSharks internal regulator can handle 12V just fine so that will make it that much easier to wire.

The only other "mod" I plan to do later when I get some money is to replace the two stock 7-cell NiMH 3000mAh batteries with some of those SPC 8000mAh 2S lipos per HariEdo's suggestion for extra long run times
replayreb is offline Find More Posts by replayreb
Last edited by replayreb; Nov 19, 2010 at 03:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2010, 01:44 AM
Registered User
replayreb's Avatar
Oxford, MS
Joined Dec 2005
494 Posts
A little before and after comparison...



replayreb is offline Find More Posts by replayreb
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2010, 07:57 AM
USA: LakeGeorge, New York
USA
Joined May 2010
4,610 Posts
wow, that thing looks custom.....

you could probably sell that custom made body with mounts
and people would be interested..... I'd buy one....

when I was making my mounts for the body and camera,
it took me atleast several weeks and atleast 10x going to
Lowes/HomeDepot for little screws/brackets/etc.... just to make
it work..... and when I got it running, my camera
mount was sooo terrible, it would shake like
madd when the Summit was on slowly 1st gear
....high speed was impossible, too shakey.....

.....but nothing as custom as yours....

you should buy a body like that, trim it, and have different paint
schemes and sell some with body mounts
..... that would save soooo much time
and frustration for many........

you did a fantastic job....
rclab1 is offline Find More Posts by rclab1
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools