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Old Sep 16, 2010, 10:17 AM
"World's Foremost Authority"
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South Central Texas
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Self-Righting Airplanes Don't Teach Newbies To Fly

All they do is teach the student to let go of the sticks.

TP
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 10:50 AM
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USA, MA, Methuen
Joined May 2008
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What would you rather:
1) student lets off sticks, learns what not to do to get them into whatever mess they were in in the first place, plane survives to fly another day

2) student doesn't know what to do, lets off sticks, plane continues on current path to ground, is done for the day if not longer
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 11:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepid Pilot View Post
All they do is teach the student to let go of the sticks.

TP
I smell a troll. Reported.

To all the people who agree: Self righting aircraft do NOT teach beginners to let go of the sticks. They help beginners with their turns, and they can provide a visual aid to showing how the plane should come out of the turn.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 11:04 AM
If in doubt, add accelerant
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United Kingdom, England, Stansted Mountfitchet
Joined May 2007
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jcantara i agree. When i learnt to fly i was always conscious not to over control the plane, one way was to take my hands entirely off the sticks for periods of time, and learn that the plane won't drop out the sky without my input. It is one of the hardest things to do as a learner, so i think it can only be a good thing if you know your plane will be safest without your input.

I can't say enough bad things about HZ's ACT though.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 11:19 AM
"World's Foremost Authority"
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South Central Texas
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Quote:
I smell a troll. Reported.
Eek!

The most important requirement of a trainer is that it fly slowly!

Self-righting is for people who cannot or will not accept the help of an experienced flier.

The persons I've helped made the quickest progress when an Ugly Stick or an Avistar was the trainer we used. These were on buddy boxes.

I had a Sig Kadet LT40 that I used as a "club" trainer. It flew magnificently slow, but I de-tuned its ability to recover in order to better teach a newbie how to do that him or her self. I used to hand the box to bystanders who had never flown an RC, none of them crashed.

Self-righting airplanes only slow you down.

TP
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 11:48 AM
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Thanks TP for admitting that your opening statement, used as the subject of this thread, is completely wrong. You are probably scratching your head right now, trying to figure out how or where you did that. The answer lies in your third line where you state: "Self-righting is for people who cannot or will not accept the help of an experienced flier."

With the rapid development and popularity of electric parkflyers and electric ultraminis, the vast majority of "newbies" learn to fly on their own. Since you did not qualify your statement by saying that you were specifically refering to the relatively small number of newbies who learn with an instructor or experienced flyer, your statement must be accepted as refering to the great majority of newbies who learn to fly on their own. And as you clearly admitted, self-righting planes are the correct choice for these flyers.

Whether or not your statement has any merit for the small number of newbies who DO receive help from an instructor or experienced flyer is a matter of opinion and debate. Personally, when I help someone learn to fly I let them have the controls for as long as possible, taking over only at the last possible moment before impending crash, flyaway, etc. If the newbie that I am helping gets into trouble but can let go of the controls, allow the plane to stabilize and then resume flying without my intervention, that newbie has made a large step forward in his learning process.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 12:06 PM
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The most important requirement of a trainer is that it fly slowly!
Now that I can wholeheartedly agree with
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 12:39 PM
Foam flogger
Roseville, CA
Joined Apr 2009
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The hardest part of learning is training your thumbs. Learning to turn the direction you want the plane to go without thinking. Self-correcting planes allow beginners to do this with less fear of cratering.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 01:20 PM
2 no or knot 2 no!
BC, Canada
Joined Sep 2009
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I'm assuming that you are referring to some sort of gyro setup that actually controls the plane and not just a stable high wing plane with dihedral. I agree with you on the former but not the latter. The HZ suber cub is definitely somewhat self righting but not entirerly or quickly to save all mistakes or wind gusts.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Tepid Pilot View Post
Self-righting airplanes only slow you down.

TP
A beginner can take a HobbyZone Champ (self righting, self landing) plane, have the discipline to wait for no winds, and inside the hour they will have the rudiments of flight down, and be ready for the next step, which is a self righting plane they must learn to dial in for C/G, etc. And all without the help of an instructor.

This new class of trainer planes is a reality, not a pipe dream.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 03:35 PM
"World's Foremost Authority"
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Quote:
...have the discipline to wait for no winds...
lol!

Tp
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 04:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepid Pilot View Post
Eek!


Self-righting is for people who cannot or will not accept the help of an experienced flier.


TP
I don't think having started on a champ is going to slow me or me sons down one bit, thank-you-much.


Dave
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepid Pilot View Post
Eek!

The most important requirement of a trainer is that it fly slowly!


Self-righting is for people who cannot or will not accept the help of an experienced flier.

The persons I've helped made the quickest progress when an Ugly Stick or an Avistar was the trainer we used. These were on buddy boxes.

I had a Sig Kadet LT40 that I used as a "club" trainer. It flew magnificently slow, but I de-tuned its ability to recover in order to better teach a newbie how to do that him or her self. I used to hand the box to bystanders who had never flown an RC, none of them crashed.


Self-righting airplanes only slow you down.

TP
Dude, what is your problem? It's comments like this that get you placed on peoples blocked list, as well as removed from forum activity. Have some respect, not everyone learns at the same rate

For what it's worth, not that you care, because you obviously know more than the rest of us, planes that self right are perfect for people who DON'T HAVE ACCESS TO SOMEONE WHO IS EXPERIENCED AND CAN HELP!!!!!!!!!

You now have the privilege of being on my blocked list.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 06:24 PM
slow but inefficient
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Riverhead NY USA
Joined Dec 2000
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Gyros are not self righting; they are position maintaining. Put a plane with gyros on it into a spin and it will keep spinning until the controls correct the spin. Almost all the comments above exhibit a lack of real hands on experience with gyros on an RC model airplane.

Check out http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1236742 , post #10 for more.
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Old Sep 16, 2010, 06:27 PM
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Wasaga Beach, Ontario
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Really? So all those FS pilots who fly everything from Katanas to A320s have no idea how to fly? Interesting.

When I was doing flight training if I ever let go of the stick I would have gotten a good smack from the instructor.

But you're right. It makes far more sense to teach someone to fly, especially RC, on an inherently unstable aeroplane.

/sarcasm.

I agree. Troll.
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