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Old Aug 31, 2010, 02:25 AM
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United States, UT, Salina
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What is the most dangerous tool in your shop.

I suppose this isn't for woodworkers only but...

Which one is it?


Several of you probably know this one for sure.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 02:40 AM
Reduce the drama...
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I am
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 03:11 AM
sensitive artsy type
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Tucker, Georgia, United States
Joined Feb 2004
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I think Rick got it.

Personally, big old shaper or overhead router, industrial size, I don't like. Some of those cutter heads are huge, takes a ton of force to make cuts that deep that are removing that much wood, and you cannot sneak up on it, take a little at a time, you have to take the whole bite at once.

Straight line rip saws can be dangerous too, as can a table saw, they can throw things at you.

I have been lucky, never been seriously hurt, but the times I came close, either did something I shouldn't have, or was cutting out a large number of things, doing repetition and sort of spaced out.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 03:45 AM
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I'm editing this post for now.

I want to see what FL and others think is the most dangerous before posting my opinion again.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 05:22 AM
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http://www.offroadfabnet.com/forums/...ead.php?t=2997

Link in post one will remind you to be careful around the shop. Heed the warnings if gore bothers you.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 05:53 AM
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Telford, UK
Joined Feb 2000
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For me it's anything sharp, hot or fast.

Whereas Netty has a particular affinity for CA glue - she really can stick herself to anything with it!

tim
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 05:54 AM
I don't want to "Switch Now"
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Toronto (Don Mills), Canada
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Table saw.
Only thing that can take off a finger in a blink of an eye.

Pat MacKenzie
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 06:00 AM
Out of Time
United States, TX
Joined Jul 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bilbobaker View Post
I suppose this isn't for woodworkers only but...

Which one is it?


Several of you probably know this one for sure.
The "me" part aside, the #1 most dangerous woodworking tool is the table saw, not because it's inherently dangerous (which it is), but because it's the easiest to mis-use.
The most recent example is an employee of a friend of mine who ran his hand through the table saw blade to the tune of over $60,000 of reconstructive surgery.
That's just the beginning; there will be much more spent on therapy over time.

It was a stupid accident that the employee admitted to ignoring basic safety rules, but due to "not quite enough insurance coverage" on the part of the business owner, the business is quickly heading into bankruptcy. The employee quit, hired an attorney, and is in the process of wringing every dime he can from the guy he worked for for 15 years.

Of all the tools in the shop, it's the table saw that has the most exposed cutting edges because many of the various ways a saw can be used dictate that no safety guard be in the way.

On the other hand, I've been using a table saw for a long time (Delta Unisaw) and I can still count to ten using my fingers, so it is possible to do woodworking without cutting parts of your body off.

If I were a much younger person with many years ahead of me, and I wanted to do some serious woodworking, I would invest in one of the SawStop machines. Expensive, but probably a smart move.

http://www.sawstop.com/howitworks/how_overview.php
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 06:35 AM
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Tucker, Georgia, United States
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Yeah, most guards that come with the saws interfere with the work, and seem to me to be more likely to distract, cause a bad cut, perhaps even an injury. Best to buy an aftermarket one, some pretty good ones out there now, or build one. I saw one, I think in Fine Woodworking, or one of their books, which attaches to the ceiling, and can be retracted for blade changes and adjustment to the work, Not much in materials to buy. Leaves a 360 degree opening around the blade.

I am not advocating anyone work without a guard. - disclaimer

Buy the best table saw you can, it is the center of the shop. Smooth operating powerful saws are safer in my opinion. Cast iron top, weight is your friend here.

I have a Unisaw too. Powermatics are also good ones, General, old Delta, Some of the Jets are also quite good. That sawstop is phenominal. I haven't used one, but getting that feature is really cheap compared to an accident. There are also better brands out there, that might have come out of a school shop class or furniture factory, but buyer beware. they can be slap worn out, with cast iron tops actually concave from all the wood run across them. A lot of them also require three phase, and a phase converter just isn't the same, but does work.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 06:41 AM
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Buffers and heat treat foil. You can't work with heat treat foil without getting cut
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 06:42 AM
AustinTatious
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Hurst, Texas, United States
Joined Jul 2003
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My stepfather has a 36" lathe ( wood) I cringe at the though of getting aloose piece of a sleeve caught in it...

I injure myself most often with the welders tho... Ive burned myself, shocked myself, sunburned my skin and given my lungs hell from breathing smoke that comes off them...
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 06:46 AM
LcJ
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United States, LA, Monroe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinTatious View Post
My stepfather has a 36" lathe ( wood) I cringe at the though of getting aloose piece of a sleeve caught in it...

I injure myself most often with the welders tho... Ive burned myself, shocked myself, sunburned my skin and given my lungs hell from breathing smoke that comes off them...
Nothing like a little insight into hell to make a man think about things.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 06:57 AM
St. Boondock
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinTatious View Post
My stepfather has a 36" lathe ( wood) I cringe at the though of getting aloose piece of a sleeve caught in it...

I injure myself most often with the welders tho... Ive burned myself, shocked myself, sunburned my skin and given my lungs hell from breathing smoke that comes off them...
My problem with wood lathes isn't getting tangled in them, it's the wood coming apart at high RPM.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 07:34 AM
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USA, FL, Pensacola
Joined Sep 2004
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+1 for the table saw. I've never been hurt (yet) but know several people that have. Did have a wake up call with mine last year when it threw a board all the way across my shop.

The SawStop apparently really does work as advertised. While at a local woodworker supply shop I met a guy that was ordering the replacement unit for his SS. Ran the palm of his hand right into the blade. The nick left in his flesh was no worse than I get every day somewhere on my bod.

The worst I've been hurt so far in 40+ years of woodworking was from a sabre saw. Right at the end of a cut the down going stroke hit a metal clamp. That caused the saw to jump up out of the cut. My lightening fast reflexes caught it and directed the blade squarely onto the knuckle of my left thumb. That joint still pops and cracks every morning.

Gotten hit a few times with objects thrown from a lawn mower.
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Old Aug 31, 2010, 07:47 AM
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I grew up with a big table saw and a really big radial arm saw in my Dads shop. I would have to give the danger edge to the radial arm saw over the table saw. There's much less guarding and that saw head can move very freely on the arm.
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