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Old Jul 23, 2010, 02:55 PM
Crash McNooblet
ci_phon's Avatar
United States, KY, Lexington
Joined Nov 2009
47 Posts
Horseflesh-

Did you get to try powering the camera directly from the flight battery? If so...did the camera's power still cut off intermittently?

I might not want to try soldering, but if removing both the camera's housing and it's battery would shave off some noticeable weight, I'd give it a try in a heart beat...I would just have to find some larger batteries though as I'm sure both the camera and plane are too much for a 150mAh to get any enjoyable flight times out of.

I do have a few 400mAh batteries left over from a heli that had been donated to me for use as spare parts, they each weight 10grams...which is only 5 more than stock 150s. It might turn out to be a close to even swap.... reduce the weight of the camera just to increase it with the extra weight of the battery... but even then I'd consider giving it a try as the difference in flight times between a 150 and a 400 would be...HELLO!!! hehe

I actually found I had made a mistake... I had glued a 5g-ish nut inside the fuse between the motor and brick, using white silicone...I didn't pay attention when I was going through the motions of the mod. If I remove that nut and combine it's weight with that of a 150 battery, there's 10grams. A 400mAh battery would be an even swap.

It's all dependent on whether or not the camera 'can' be powered directly of of the flight battery though.

I'll update the next time I have actually made some sort of real progress. Until then I must tend to some homework, I have exams coming up next week and I've got about 3 weeks worth of assignments that I have yet to even look at, that must be completed before I can even take my finals!!! Oops!
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Old Jul 23, 2010, 03:43 PM
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United States, WA, Woodinville
Joined May 2010
336 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by ci_phon View Post
It's all dependent on whether or not the camera 'can' be powered directly of of the flight battery though.
Using a Turnigy 160, I was not able to successfully power the camera off the plane's battery. I though I might have picked a bad spot on the RX board for power, so I tried a raw battery tap... Same problem, the video would cut out after about 10 seconds.

That does not mean it is not worth you trying, especially with a bigger battery. These cameras have a lot of quality variation and mine might just be flaky somehow.

I plan to use some battery connectors so that I can run the camera off my tiny 70mAh Vapor battery. With a few inches of wire between the board and the battery I should be able to adjust COG pretty well.
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Old Jul 23, 2010, 09:40 PM
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Canada
Joined Aug 2009
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With the newly installed the new UMP51 motor, I took my Champ to the park and first flight was great, tons of power, better speed and climbing ability, BUT Guess what?

The 2nd Flight the brand F'ing new UMP51 Motor started what its well known for - the "death screech".

So, here I sit, motorless again for god knows how long.

Anyone whom knows anything about these UMP51 motors, knows how hit and miss they are, and how aggravating it can be to get a bad one
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Old Jul 24, 2010, 12:01 AM
Crash McNooblet
ci_phon's Avatar
United States, KY, Lexington
Joined Nov 2009
47 Posts
Restoring that pesky Mustang motor!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Razors edge 29 View Post
The 2nd Flight the brand F'ing new UMP51 Motor started what its well known for - the "death screech".

So, here I sit, motorless again for god knows how long.

Anyone whom knows anything about these UMP51 motors, knows how hit and miss they are, and how aggravating it can be to get a bad one


OOH OOOH...I know this one!!!! This is another super long post...but I promise it is well worth the read! Especially if anyone is like me...and doesn't have much of a budget for planes and whatnot. I can't go out and buy new parts or motors each time they go bad, as soon as they go bad...so I've had to find ways to fix or to..."restore" those motors or parts. In this sense...I've found a good way to restore my bushed motors, amongst other things.

Please note though, although the post is long and may seem like there's entirely too much involved in restoring these cheap little $6-$12 motors...or however much they cost...there really isn't all that much to this...and it will become as easy as 2nd nature to you, once you've done it to at least one motor!!! See, I've never actually had to buy a replacement motor for any of my helis or planes...because of this process I am about to go into detail on.

On another note, I state 2 similar methods here.. The first uses oil only, the 2nd method is similar to the 'oil only' method but uses something additional...and is the only method I've used with complete success. I've used the 'oil only' way on a motor, and have had less than perfect results, and then have gone and used the 2nd method on that same motor...and the results were drastically improved!

Some others have surely mentioned this, or something similar to this in the past...it's not a secret. The additional component I mention is however...not commonly mentioned as far as I know.

So...ready for some reading? Maybe I should make a video of this, it'd be much easier to explain...and faster to get it over with!


Ready?

Got some WD40? How about a wind instrument's "rotor oil", or some hair clipper oil? The clearer and more refined the better basically, but generic WD 40 will work...sometimes..

1)Try to remove the motor from the gearbox or whatever you prefer...but try to get the motor out of the plane and away from the foam...just to prevent the foam from getting soggy, which it sometimes will when oil gets on it...

2)On the front -or- face of the motor, you will see two tiny holes. The goal here is to find some means of FLOODING the motor with so much oil...that it starts to slowly seep out the back/bottom/cap end...BUT, you may not be able to get it to seep out UNTIL the motor starts spinning...which will come in the next 2 steps...

3)After the motor is flooded with some sort of oil, work the motor between your index finger and thum, rotating BOTH back and forth, gently, for about a good 30 seconds. Then work it for another 30 seconds or so in the proper rotational direction.

4)Squirt more oil inside.

5)Connect the motor to your brick, ready your transmitter, connect flight battery. Make sure your throttle is trimmed to it's lowest position and no throttle is applied via stick.

****WARNING!!!!**** Do NOT exceed more than 20% throttle-ish at any time!!! Doing so may result in COMPLETELY burning up your motor! Because the motor is out of the plane, there is no resistance being generated by the gearbox or prop.... with no resistance, it is easy to "overspeed" your motor, causing excessive heat, friction, and wear...quickly destroying/seizing the motor.

6) CAREFULLY... slowly apply some throttle...keep it slow at first, barely spinning the motor. Make sure the motor is spinning basically...you may try it as low as possible to the point where you have to use your fingers to "nudge" it a bit...which it will still stop spinning right after your fingers leave the gear/shaft.

7) Slowly apply more throttle, gradually increasing the RPMs until you start to see the oil start to seep out the cap end of the motor. Now that you know at which RPMs the oil will seep out, fluctuate the throttle down and up...and repeat the up/down throttle for about 20 seconds or so...trying not to stop the motor and not to go faster than is needed to make the oil seep. Catch the oil/wipe it up as it's seeping out. (Keep in mind that thinner oils will seep out at lower rpms than thicker oils will, hence the reason for looking for the thinnest clearest oil possible.

8) Stop the motor, flood again, and repeat step 7 a few times, maybe 4 or 5 times

9)After 4 or 5 rounds of pulsing the throttle while the oil seeps out, go one more time but without pulsing the motor. Keep it at a constant RPM to the point where the oil seeps out, maybe just a bit faster than that..but be careful not to overspeed. Keep the motor going until the seepage flow starts to reduce, and slow the motor with it. Continue to run the motor though until the seepage has pretty much stopped. There will still be some small amounts oil seeping out over time, but it will not flow like it did when you first flooded the motor.

10) Now that the seepage has stopped and all that remains in the motor is some residual amounts of oil, wipe the motor clean, reinstall into gearbox/plane. Now, find some way to cover up/wrap up the cap-end of the motor with a cotton ball, your wife's makup removing cotton discs...whatever...I myself prefer to strip the tops off a few cotton swabs...pulling the cotton off and trying to keep it loose, but confined to a strip of cotton that's about 1/2 inch to an inch long. Completely encase the cap and as much of the motor casing as you can working your way towards the shaft nut. Be careful though not to let any cotton fibers or whatever get too close to that nylon shaft nut or the shaft itself! If you let it touch anything that move..lol, you'll regret it when the stuff starts to get wrapped around it! I used a piece of scotch tape, sticky side facing motor, butt up against the cap...sandwiching the cotton between tape and motor. ** The reason for doing this is to catch any residual oil that might leak out over the duration of the next several (10 or so) flights, but be careful also to not add too much cotton, toiletpaper, cloth..sponge..etc etc...you don't want ot make the plane too nose heavy. After the 10th flight or so, remove the cotton and replace it with fresh clean cotton...for one more flight. After that 1 more flight, check the new cotton for oil, if there is none, go ahead and removed the rest of the cotton and voila.... if there is still oil leaking out...fly a few more times with the cotton in...and repeat the checking process until it's dry or until you get bored with doing this crap.


Now for the better, 2nd way...


The safer and more effective way to doing this requires an additional chemical...called "DeoxIT" (D-Series) by Caig Labs. . This link will take you to the product/store page, you will see a bottle with a needle tip applicator, red solution, and is 100% solution as opposed to their weaker formulas of 25 & 5%. Not to plug a product here, but I've been using this stuff for about 16 years now. I was introduced to it in the Marines, at which time I was an "aviation hydraulics & structural repair mech." (aka 6154 -or- Airframes Mechanic for short). We used this to clean the contacts in 'cannon plugs' and other miscellaneous crap, as well as various contacts in our field radios (PRC-77s & 114s), which constantly had poor handset connectors!. After that, I brought my knowledge with me when I worked for a company that made various automated equipment and machinery, such as some of those robotic welding and painting machines used in automotive plants. This is when I first tested the stuff on an electrical motor, which was actually a corkscrew servo motor the size of a pack of cigarettes, which costed about $20,000 US. They didn't want to buy a new one, so I got to tear it apart. yay for having a job held over my head! Now, I use the stuff for anything electrical that's corroded, tarnished, dirty, loose...etc etc, has not failed me yet!

Anywho, I've used this DeoxIT + oil on my Mustang's motor, which started to seize up after only the 8th battery. I had even called HH on the day I bought my Mustang and told them that my motor was "whining" unusually, and was told "Mine sounds like that too, it's not a problem. It'll get quieter as it gets broken in too." Uh...sure it got quieter...mid flight it shut right the heck up....WHEN IT STOPPED SPINNING ON ME!!! lol I gave it the DeoxIT & oil treatment...and after a few minutes...it was fine, better than new even! So far, I've flown my Mustang with the very same original motor another 74 flights to date. Still working strong! Naturally, it ended up "sounding" differently than it did, and differently than the replacement motor HH gave me anyways, which is now in my Champ. I'm sure that there is still some oil inside it, which probably "doesn't" help it to spin as fast as it could...but it IS getting faster and quieter yet. Which by the way, after restoring it...it did have a little less thrust/spin to it, but was quickly up to par, and beyond...after about 4 or 5 packs worth of flights...keeping those few first flights gentle on the throttle.

If you were to use DeoxIT in the motor restoration process ever...you'd change the steps up a bit by starting with DeoxIT first, flood the motor with it until it will hold no more (it wont seep out easily at all), work motor with fingers, fill again...work again. THEN you'd connect to power, apply the light throttle just enough to make it spin without the need of fingers...at which time you would ALSO start adding the thinnest/clearest oil you can find into one of the holes in the motor, but do not continually squirt the oil in there...just a bit a a time. Increase throttle until seepage occurs, it'll be red or hopefully pink by now. Stop motor, add oil, throttle up until seepage occurs and run with CAP END DOWN, for appx. 30 seconds, pulsing the motor as you go along. Stop and repeat with the oil and pulsing the motor...until all of the seepage has turned CLEAR, no more pink showing!

****(I highly recommend "rotor oil" above all else! Then my 2nd choice would be hair clipper oil, or something as close to that as possible! Thinner oils do work better than thicker oils, in most motors I've mucked with from those the size of these particular Mustang motors, up to those in an electric fan with 18" fan blades.)

After the seepage has become clear... continue on with the 1st methods step number 9's bold print. Continue until dry, which is the end of this torment.

As I've mentioned, this has worked for me with great results! I'm sure I have gotten lucky though, to the point where none of my 'bad' motors have gone bad because of fried internal electronics.... Some might have a sensor on the 'inside' of the case & cap to detect it's RPMs, and is tied into the circuitry to the point where if that sensor fries, the motor stops working....those kind of internal electronic problems have not occured for me yet....soooo....

I really hope this has helped someone! The DeoxIT is a great addition to any repair kit IMO! I keep a bottle at home, in my field repair kit, and in my garage.

Here are some links for DeoxIT & "rotor oil".

DeoxIT D Series products

The SPECIFIC DeoxIT product I use and mentioned in this long winded snooze

Yamaha Rotor Oil


I'll try to make a video and post it up on Youtube sometime soon and link it here in some way...but until then...

Good luck to anyone willing to give it a whirl! Again, I hope this helps!

(man...this was long, I am not all that good at making a guide or tutorial it would seem. Good thing my flying is better than my writing! )
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Old Jul 24, 2010, 07:50 AM
Registered User
Gulf Breeze, FL
Joined Jul 2006
2,881 Posts
Nice "tutorial, ci_phon - thanks.

I've read MANY posts on RCGroups that poo poo WD-40 because it gunks up. However, I've seen as many post extolling the virtues of Tri-Flow light oil lubricant. I got mine at WalMart in the bicycle section.

Gene K
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Old Jul 24, 2010, 08:20 AM
Fly em if ya got em.
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Winder Ga
Joined Sep 2008
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I use break-free clp. A very good product too. Happy Flying. Lee
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Old Jul 24, 2010, 06:53 PM
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Joined Jun 2010
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Does anyone have a good idea on how to stiffen/straighten the tail on a Champ without adding a bunch of weight?
I have one flap pointing up and one side down.
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Old Jul 24, 2010, 07:05 PM
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Razors edge 29's Avatar
Canada
Joined Aug 2009
20,493 Posts
Make a tail out of balsa or use CF rods to reinforce.





Quote:
Originally Posted by jazz53 View Post
Does anyone have a good idea on how to stiffen/straighten the tail on a Champ without adding a bunch of weight?
I have one flap pointing up and one side down.
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Old Jul 24, 2010, 07:10 PM
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Razors edge 29's Avatar
Canada
Joined Aug 2009
20,493 Posts
I might try the oil method - thanks





Quote:
Originally Posted by ci_phon View Post
OOH OOOH...I know this one!!!! This is another super long post...but I promise it is well worth the read! Especially if anyone is like me...and doesn't have much of a budget for planes and whatnot. I can't go out and buy new parts or motors each time they go bad, as soon as they go bad...so I've had to find ways to fix or to..."restore" those motors or parts. In this sense...I've found a good way to restore my bushed motors, amongst other things.

Please note though, although the post is long and may seem like there's entirely too much involved in restoring these cheap little $6-$12 motors...or however much they cost...there really isn't all that much to this...and it will become as easy as 2nd nature to you, once you've done it to at least one motor!!! See, I've never actually had to buy a replacement motor for any of my helis or planes...because of this process I am about to go into detail on.

On another note, I state 2 similar methods here.. The first uses oil only, the 2nd method is similar to the 'oil only' method but uses something additional...and is the only method I've used with complete success. I've used the 'oil only' way on a motor, and have had less than perfect results, and then have gone and used the 2nd method on that same motor...and the results were drastically improved!

Some others have surely mentioned this, or something similar to this in the past...it's not a secret. The additional component I mention is however...not commonly mentioned as far as I know.

So...ready for some reading? Maybe I should make a video of this, it'd be much easier to explain...and faster to get it over with!


Ready?

Got some WD40? How about a wind instrument's "rotor oil", or some hair clipper oil? The clearer and more refined the better basically, but generic WD 40 will work...sometimes..

1)Try to remove the motor from the gearbox or whatever you prefer...but try to get the motor out of the plane and away from the foam...just to prevent the foam from getting soggy, which it sometimes will when oil gets on it...

2)On the front -or- face of the motor, you will see two tiny holes. The goal here is to find some means of FLOODING the motor with so much oil...that it starts to slowly seep out the back/bottom/cap end...BUT, you may not be able to get it to seep out UNTIL the motor starts spinning...which will come in the next 2 steps...

3)After the motor is flooded with some sort of oil, work the motor between your index finger and thum, rotating BOTH back and forth, gently, for about a good 30 seconds. Then work it for another 30 seconds or so in the proper rotational direction.

4)Squirt more oil inside.

5)Connect the motor to your brick, ready your transmitter, connect flight battery. Make sure your throttle is trimmed to it's lowest position and no throttle is applied via stick.

****WARNING!!!!**** Do NOT exceed more than 20% throttle-ish at any time!!! Doing so may result in COMPLETELY burning up your motor! Because the motor is out of the plane, there is no resistance being generated by the gearbox or prop.... with no resistance, it is easy to "overspeed" your motor, causing excessive heat, friction, and wear...quickly destroying/seizing the motor.

6) CAREFULLY... slowly apply some throttle...keep it slow at first, barely spinning the motor. Make sure the motor is spinning basically...you may try it as low as possible to the point where you have to use your fingers to "nudge" it a bit...which it will still stop spinning right after your fingers leave the gear/shaft.

7) Slowly apply more throttle, gradually increasing the RPMs until you start to see the oil start to seep out the cap end of the motor. Now that you know at which RPMs the oil will seep out, fluctuate the throttle down and up...and repeat the up/down throttle for about 20 seconds or so...trying not to stop the motor and not to go faster than is needed to make the oil seep. Catch the oil/wipe it up as it's seeping out. (Keep in mind that thinner oils will seep out at lower rpms than thicker oils will, hence the reason for looking for the thinnest clearest oil possible.

8) Stop the motor, flood again, and repeat step 7 a few times, maybe 4 or 5 times

9)After 4 or 5 rounds of pulsing the throttle while the oil seeps out, go one more time but without pulsing the motor. Keep it at a constant RPM to the point where the oil seeps out, maybe just a bit faster than that..but be careful not to overspeed. Keep the motor going until the seepage flow starts to reduce, and slow the motor with it. Continue to run the motor though until the seepage has pretty much stopped. There will still be some small amounts oil seeping out over time, but it will not flow like it did when you first flooded the motor.

10) Now that the seepage has stopped and all that remains in the motor is some residual amounts of oil, wipe the motor clean, reinstall into gearbox/plane. Now, find some way to cover up/wrap up the cap-end of the motor with a cotton ball, your wife's makup removing cotton discs...whatever...I myself prefer to strip the tops off a few cotton swabs...pulling the cotton off and trying to keep it loose, but confined to a strip of cotton that's about 1/2 inch to an inch long. Completely encase the cap and as much of the motor casing as you can working your way towards the shaft nut. Be careful though not to let any cotton fibers or whatever get too close to that nylon shaft nut or the shaft itself! If you let it touch anything that move..lol, you'll regret it when the stuff starts to get wrapped around it! I used a piece of scotch tape, sticky side facing motor, butt up against the cap...sandwiching the cotton between tape and motor. ** The reason for doing this is to catch any residual oil that might leak out over the duration of the next several (10 or so) flights, but be careful also to not add too much cotton, toiletpaper, cloth..sponge..etc etc...you don't want ot make the plane too nose heavy. After the 10th flight or so, remove the cotton and replace it with fresh clean cotton...for one more flight. After that 1 more flight, check the new cotton for oil, if there is none, go ahead and removed the rest of the cotton and voila.... if there is still oil leaking out...fly a few more times with the cotton in...and repeat the checking process until it's dry or until you get bored with doing this crap.


Now for the better, 2nd way...


The safer and more effective way to doing this requires an additional chemical...called "DeoxIT" (D-Series) by Caig Labs. . This link will take you to the product/store page, you will see a bottle with a needle tip applicator, red solution, and is 100% solution as opposed to their weaker formulas of 25 & 5%. Not to plug a product here, but I've been using this stuff for about 16 years now. I was introduced to it in the Marines, at which time I was an "aviation hydraulics & structural repair mech." (aka 6154 -or- Airframes Mechanic for short). We used this to clean the contacts in 'cannon plugs' and other miscellaneous crap, as well as various contacts in our field radios (PRC-77s & 114s), which constantly had poor handset connectors!. After that, I brought my knowledge with me when I worked for a company that made various automated equipment and machinery, such as some of those robotic welding and painting machines used in automotive plants. This is when I first tested the stuff on an electrical motor, which was actually a corkscrew servo motor the size of a pack of cigarettes, which costed about $20,000 US. They didn't want to buy a new one, so I got to tear it apart. yay for having a job held over my head! Now, I use the stuff for anything electrical that's corroded, tarnished, dirty, loose...etc etc, has not failed me yet!

Anywho, I've used this DeoxIT + oil on my Mustang's motor, which started to seize up after only the 8th battery. I had even called HH on the day I bought my Mustang and told them that my motor was "whining" unusually, and was told "Mine sounds like that too, it's not a problem. It'll get quieter as it gets broken in too." Uh...sure it got quieter...mid flight it shut right the heck up....WHEN IT STOPPED SPINNING ON ME!!! lol I gave it the DeoxIT & oil treatment...and after a few minutes...it was fine, better than new even! So far, I've flown my Mustang with the very same original motor another 74 flights to date. Still working strong! Naturally, it ended up "sounding" differently than it did, and differently than the replacement motor HH gave me anyways, which is now in my Champ. I'm sure that there is still some oil inside it, which probably "doesn't" help it to spin as fast as it could...but it IS getting faster and quieter yet. Which by the way, after restoring it...it did have a little less thrust/spin to it, but was quickly up to par, and beyond...after about 4 or 5 packs worth of flights...keeping those few first flights gentle on the throttle.

If you were to use DeoxIT in the motor restoration process ever...you'd change the steps up a bit by starting with DeoxIT first, flood the motor with it until it will hold no more (it wont seep out easily at all), work motor with fingers, fill again...work again. THEN you'd connect to power, apply the light throttle just enough to make it spin without the need of fingers...at which time you would ALSO start adding the thinnest/clearest oil you can find into one of the holes in the motor, but do not continually squirt the oil in there...just a bit a a time. Increase throttle until seepage occurs, it'll be red or hopefully pink by now. Stop motor, add oil, throttle up until seepage occurs and run with CAP END DOWN, for appx. 30 seconds, pulsing the motor as you go along. Stop and repeat with the oil and pulsing the motor...until all of the seepage has turned CLEAR, no more pink showing!

****(I highly recommend "rotor oil" above all else! Then my 2nd choice would be hair clipper oil, or something as close to that as possible! Thinner oils do work better than thicker oils, in most motors I've mucked with from those the size of these particular Mustang motors, up to those in an electric fan with 18" fan blades.)

After the seepage has become clear... continue on with the 1st methods step number 9's bold print. Continue until dry, which is the end of this torment.

As I've mentioned, this has worked for me with great results! I'm sure I have gotten lucky though, to the point where none of my 'bad' motors have gone bad because of fried internal electronics.... Some might have a sensor on the 'inside' of the case & cap to detect it's RPMs, and is tied into the circuitry to the point where if that sensor fries, the motor stops working....those kind of internal electronic problems have not occured for me yet....soooo....

I really hope this has helped someone! The DeoxIT is a great addition to any repair kit IMO! I keep a bottle at home, in my field repair kit, and in my garage.

Here are some links for DeoxIT & "rotor oil".

DeoxIT D Series products

The SPECIFIC DeoxIT product I use and mentioned in this long winded snooze

Yamaha Rotor Oil


I'll try to make a video and post it up on Youtube sometime soon and link it here in some way...but until then...

Good luck to anyone willing to give it a whirl! Again, I hope this helps!

(man...this was long, I am not all that good at making a guide or tutorial it would seem. Good thing my flying is better than my writing! )
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Old Jul 24, 2010, 07:11 PM
jettrooper02's Avatar
USA, WA, Bonney Lake
Joined Aug 2008
3,416 Posts
alright, this thread has made me want a champ! thank you, and i'll report back once i get one.
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Old Jul 25, 2010, 01:34 AM
Crash McNooblet
ci_phon's Avatar
United States, KY, Lexington
Joined Nov 2009
47 Posts
Alrighty, I finally got my test flight video(s) uploaded. These are the first 2 flights after modding my Champ with my keychain camera mount.

The first video really shows just how poorly it flew, partially due to wind I'm sure, but a lot of it has to have something to do with the extra weight! When i went to take off, you'll notice I lost control of it right from the get-go and had to give it 2nd try...which was an ugly take off to say the least, I almost nailed a light post along with the fence. (I took off as soon as the wind had completely stopped, so this point in the video is probably the best example of what I mean by wobbly).

The 2nd test flight was better, the take off was noticeably better, most of the flight was also a lot smoother. The only thing that had changed between flights was that I had adjusted the 'wire loops' in both the rudder's and elevator's linkages, because of all the trimming I had done during the first flight. (I'll adjust the loops on occasion, to make up for added trim adjustments...this way I can partially reset my trim settings on my Tx...so I have more room in my Tx to work with later).

All this is why I was asking if the wings need to be reinforced.....or would something like twoplanekid's idea of wing slats help out some? (aside from lowering weight, which I'm still working on regardless).

Thanks all, and enjoy my 7+ minutes of grassy blurs!

Test flight #1

Test Flight #2
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Old Jul 25, 2010, 11:36 AM
The building never ends!
Tucson, AZ
Joined Oct 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ci_phon View Post
Alrighty, I finally got my test flight video(s) uploaded. These are the first 2 flights after modding my Champ with my keychain camera mount.

The first video really shows just how poorly it flew, partially due to wind I'm sure, but a lot of it has to have something to do with the extra weight!
The Champ can handle the extra weight, as long as you get it balanced correctly. Get the CG right, and it'll fly just as good with the camera as it does without it, but the range of tolerable CGs with the added weight is really tight, and if you get outside of that range, the plane gets unhappy in a hurry.

Quote:
All this is why I was asking if the wings need to be reinforced.....or would something like twoplanekid's idea of wing slats help out some? (aside from lowering weight, which I'm still working on regardless).
They don't really need reinforcement. I did loops and rolls with mine with a camera onboard, and it didn't stress the wings. If you want to reinforce the wings, just get some ~1.5mm carbon fiber rod, some dark yellow paint, and cut yourself some functional wing struts. Secure them in drops of foam-safe CA. Wing flex will be dramatically reduced, and the struts will tend to pop off in a nasty crash.
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Old Jul 25, 2010, 05:04 PM
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Razors edge 29's Avatar
Canada
Joined Aug 2009
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Today I have been using the below method to try to revamp several motors.

The first is the original champ motor, I have which has less than 100 flights, but close to 100 and it died by screeching much like the UMP51 motor is known for.

I have done the below method using 3-1 dry silicone spray and electric raor oil. BUT, this motor is easier than the UMP51 motor because there are 2 holes on the face of the can, where the UMP51 motor has none.

I believe I have revamped the Champ motor, but, the brand new defective UMP51 motor I am working on, is not yet yielding the same results.

I will keep trying. What I have done, since it has no holes, is to introduce electric razor oil from the cap end, and also let it sit in a narrow plastic container full of the silicone spray. I am getting lube inside, and when powering the motor up, it will not screech for a few minutes at 20% throttle, BUT, it shortly begins to screech again. It may bea lost cause, my I'll still try anyways



Got some WD40? How about a wind instrument's "rotor oil", or some hair clipper oil? The clearer and more refined the better basically, but generic WD 40 will work...sometimes..

1)Try to remove the motor from the gearbox or whatever you prefer...but try to get the motor out of the plane and away from the foam...just to prevent the foam from getting soggy, which it sometimes will when oil gets on it...

2)On the front -or- face of the motor, you will see two tiny holes. The goal here is to find some means of FLOODING the motor with so much oil...that it starts to slowly seep out the back/bottom/cap end...BUT, you may not be able to get it to seep out UNTIL the motor starts spinning...which will come in the next 2 steps...

3)After the motor is flooded with some sort of oil, work the motor between your index finger and thum, rotating BOTH back and forth, gently, for about a good 30 seconds. Then work it for another 30 seconds or so in the proper rotational direction.

4)Squirt more oil inside.

5)Connect the motor to your brick, ready your transmitter, connect flight battery. Make sure your throttle is trimmed to it's lowest position and no throttle is applied via stick.

****WARNING!!!!**** Do NOT exceed more than 20% throttle-ish at any time!!! Doing so may result in COMPLETELY burning up your motor! Because the motor is out of the plane, there is no resistance being generated by the gearbox or prop.... with no resistance, it is easy to "overspeed" your motor, causing excessive heat, friction, and wear...quickly destroying/seizing the motor.

6) CAREFULLY... slowly apply some throttle...keep it slow at first, barely spinning the motor. Make sure the motor is spinning basically...you may try it as low as possible to the point where you have to use your fingers to "nudge" it a bit...which it will still stop spinning right after your fingers leave the gear/shaft.

7) Slowly apply more throttle, gradually increasing the RPMs until you start to see the oil start to seep out the cap end of the motor. Now that you know at which RPMs the oil will seep out, fluctuate the throttle down and up...and repeat the up/down throttle for about 20 seconds or so...trying not to stop the motor and not to go faster than is needed to make the oil seep. Catch the oil/wipe it up as it's seeping out. (Keep in mind that thinner oils will seep out at lower rpms than thicker oils will, hence the reason for looking for the thinnest clearest oil possible.

8) Stop the motor, flood again, and repeat step 7 a few times, maybe 4 or 5 times

9)After 4 or 5 rounds of pulsing the throttle while the oil seeps out, go one more time but without pulsing the motor. Keep it at a constant RPM to the point where the oil seeps out, maybe just a bit faster than that..but be careful not to overspeed. Keep the motor going until the seepage flow starts to reduce, and slow the motor with it. Continue to run the motor though until the seepage has pretty much stopped. There will still be some small amounts oil seeping out over time, but it will not flow like it did when you first flooded the motor.

10) Now that the seepage has stopped and all that remains in the motor is some residual amounts of oil, wipe the motor clean, reinstall into gearbox/plane. Now, find some way to cover up/wrap up the cap-end of the motor with a cotton ball, your wife's makup removing cotton discs...whatever...I myself prefer to strip the tops off a few cotton swabs...pulling the cotton off and trying to keep it loose, but confined to a strip of cotton that's about 1/2 inch to an inch long. Completely encase the cap and as much of the motor casing as you can working your way towards the shaft nut. Be careful though not to let any cotton fibers or whatever get too close to that nylon shaft nut or the shaft itself! If you let it touch anything that move..lol, you'll regret it when the stuff starts to get wrapped around it! I used a piece of scotch tape, sticky side facing motor, butt up against the cap...sandwiching the cotton between tape and motor. ** The reason for doing this is to catch any residual oil that might leak out over the duration of the next several (10 or so) flights, but be careful also to not add too much cotton, toiletpaper, cloth..sponge..etc etc...you don't want ot make the plane too nose heavy. After the 10th flight or so, remove the cotton and replace it with fresh clean cotton...for one more flight. After that 1 more flight, check the new cotton for oil, if there is none, go ahead and removed the rest of the cotton and voila.... if there is still oil leaking out...fly a few more times with the cotton in...and repeat the checking process until it's dry or until you get bored with doing this crap.
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Old Jul 25, 2010, 05:12 PM
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Nice videos. I just made a quick vid on my champ, but its has a lot of horizontal lines. Any ideas how to eliminate that? I mounted mine with the case removed, bottom of fuse between the landing gear struts. I had a piece of foam, between the cam and the fuse, and tape holding it on. Im thinking the tape is transferring vibrations to the video...?

thanks
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Old Jul 25, 2010, 05:23 PM
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Joined Jul 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kamlooper View Post
Nice videos. I just made a quick vid on my champ, but its has a lot of horizontal lines. Any ideas how to eliminate that? I mounted mine with the case removed, bottom of fuse between the landing gear struts. I had a piece of foam, between the cam and the fuse, and tape holding it on. Im thinking the tape is transferring vibrations to the video...?

thanks
Aim the camera where it is -not- looking through the prop.. the horizontal lines are the prop moving faster then the frame-rate of the camera, and doing what is called "Clipping" on each frame..
My new camera is on the way to me now, and cant wait to get the modified champ in the air with it..

Before long i'm going mod-evil on my champ..
It's going to end up 10mm inrunner brushless powered in the stock gearbox, with a 5a esc and a 5043.. and a 900mah 1s pack inside the fuselage...
and a second champ wing grafted under the belly to help with the extra weight..
Would that make it a Bi-champ?
It should be able to fly a solid hour+ per flight, which is perfect because the cam can only do 50 minute videos..

~Kev
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