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Old Aug 20, 2011, 10:20 AM
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jeeper1977's Avatar
Lake Havasu City AZ
Joined Feb 2009
165 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by jj604 View Post
Ted, not disputing that it works and it certainly makes them easier to connect and disconnect but I have always been puzzled by putting dielectric (Definition = non-conducting) grease on high current electrical connectors.

The Marine guys argue the corrosion preventive properties KEEP connectors in good shape but they never argue it improves the conductivity.

I'm assuming the grease gets displaced at much lower pressure than the Deans et al have when the connection is made but I would be interested if anyone has actually looked at what the increase in resistance is?

There is such a thing as CONDUCTIVE grease but that's not what we are talking about here I think???

Just curious - not arguing.

John
Yes, I use silicon grease that is conductive used to mount semiconductors to heat sinks. Found it at Radio Shack.

Caution: Use a very VERY small amount, don't want the grease bridging between the two poles on the connector.
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Last edited by jeeper1977; Aug 20, 2011 at 10:57 AM. Reason: Caution
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 10:33 AM
Clueless, but trying
Orcoz's Avatar
United States, WA, Enumclaw
Joined Nov 2001
752 Posts
Loved your post Markran! Thank you for the time you've invested in sharing. You're first flight experience is something we can all relate to - and continue to all too often. I find myself 'rushing' to the flight line (field beside my house) in those spare moments when the wife doesn't have a list of things to be done... the adrenaline and heart rate are just part of the experience.
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 10:59 AM
Argue for your limitations
ajbaker's Avatar
Lincoln, CA
Joined Oct 2006
8,422 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarHopper44 View Post
O.
M.
G.
PERIOD!

Man, if I was shied away before, I'm just plain skeerd now! Sorry to hear about the loss involved....that had to really hurt.

OH....was that one of that eBuy brand shown?
If not - which?????
Yup. The Viverrine.
AJ
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 01:20 PM
Row 0, Seat A
G550Ted's Avatar
Savannah, GA
Joined Jan 2008
2,705 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeeper1977 View Post
Yes, I use silicon grease that is conductive used to mount semiconductors to heat sinks. Found it at Radio Shack.

Caution: Use a very VERY small amount, don't want the grease bridging between the two poles on the connector.
Curious. Was that a heat conducting grease or electrically conducting? I don't think that any grease type product used on circuitry is electrically conductive.

Ted
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 01:29 PM
You can't take the sky from me
scott page's Avatar
United States, WA, Richland
Joined May 2009
5,909 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markran View Post

My questions:

1. What are those beeps?
2. Is 3.98v a reasonable reading from brand new 2200 3s after 5-7 mins of conservative 3/4 throttle (avg) flying?
1. Prof already pointed out that this is probably because you turned off the TX before unplugging the battery. I agree and want to add, "DON'T DO THAT" If the receiver has no signal the motor may start on it's own - sometimes due to a "failsafe" setting, other times ??? So what if you airplane flys off. That's not the worry - it's those spinning knives that can start up unpredictably with the TX off. Don't make me post the pictures of my buddies 70 stitches in his hand and arm with a severed artery and exposed bone.
I also highly recommend you install a switch or see if you can set tour TX to lock out the throttle -- sometimes called throttle cut, sometimes called throttle function, sometimes not available - in which case put a switch on it.

2. Dude, you could have flown until dark thirty with that battery. This is the guidelines I give my students. Charged batteries should show over 4.15/cell or something is not right. Don't fly when starting below 3.9v/cell. Avoid discharging below 3.5v/cell. Don't discharge below 3.2 v/cell. If you ever drop below 3.0v/cell recharge immediately at <.5C. The damage done by over discharging or over charging is a function of the magnitude of over/under and time.
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 02:08 PM
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Joined Jul 2008
187 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by yannc View Post
The stock one (with stock motor), enough power for what I do.
I'm going to correct myself, I built this plane long time ago and I forgot
I use the 6x4E that everybody is using.
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 02:57 PM
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Joined Jul 2008
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"V2 has a hidden and completely internal compartment for the weight. Hold it up to a strong light and look for a dark area right up front in the nose.
You might pry the fuse halves apart with some warmth and patience to separate the stickum.
I have a V1.
Cliff"

This is confusing me. When the V2 was released, it was said that it didn't have the washers or weights in the nose. Mine came glued in so I couldn't see anything. I could find some tips about how to remove the washers on a V1 but I didn't see anything about removing ballast on a V2.

Before I start the surgery procedure, can somebody with a V2 confirm that there is something, and where about it is located? I will just do a cut to get it out and glue the foam piece back in.
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 05:24 PM
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Markran's Avatar
United States, CA, Sacramento
Joined Aug 2011
588 Posts
2nd Flight Report - Follow Up to Yesterday's Report

When I didn't make it out to meet up with the local group of unaffiliated fliers last night for my first new-pilot, new-plane shake-down flight and instead soloed on my own at a local soccer field, I sent a message asking for a rain check. I got a message back late last night that they were going out flying again this morning, so I went out to join them.

The first thing I learned is that I absolutely should not have tried soloing by myself for my first flight ever. It was impulsive and dumb and fortunately, last night, "lucky" beat "stupid".

The first reason I should have waited to join the experienced fliers is that their location is really ideal. A large residential development that was never developed, newly paved streets and sidewalks surrounded by belly-lander friendly scrub brush up to two feet tall. Nothing taller than a fire hydrant for over a quarter mile in any direction. This is way, way better than any city park. No trees, no people, no busy streets or nearby fenced backyards.

Second, was having some friendly and seasoned RCers there. It's not anything that they did in particular but it had a way of dropping my blood pressure down another couple points.

My new first-timer coach, Ben (found through these forums) took my SkyS up and I was happy to hear from him that everything was great on the plane. He trimmed one surface a couple tics and that was it. It was flying hands-free, level and true. This was good to hear, because as a newbie, not just to the SkyS but to RC, it's hard to know what's normal and what's not. It's really a testament to the instructions on these forums (and certainly not the included manual or any assembly skills on my part). My CoG estimate and first-time attempt at visually trimming the plane worked out.

He took it up a fair way and handed it over to me and I started doing some big wide circuits around the flying area while getting used to the feel and the wind. Today the wind was about 8-10 mph, which was enough that I probably wouldn't have flown by myself. Ben stayed nearby for the first few minutes and gave me some tips. One good one was to just tap the sticks to correct instead of holding them. This removes the likelihood of over-correcting. It seemed to work fine as I had no trouble over-correcting and quickly got used to the wind. I flew around and got steadily more confident with the handling of the plane. Ben came back over and talked me through the landing which went fine. He then used his battery checker to estimate flying time. He thought that I should be able to get about 15 minutes out of a 2200 mAh 3s (RTF brushless + 6x4e propeller). So I took a break for a few minutes to watch some of the other planes fly including Ben's awesome helicopter, a jet, quadcopter and a few others. Then I swapped out for my other battery and set the countdown timer on my phone for 15 minutes. I need to get a real RC timer or a transmitter with one built-in. There are two problems with the smartphone timer. First you have to get your phone out to see it, which isn't practical while flying and second, when it hits zero it doesn't keep counting below zero. Once you go over it's no help estimating how long over you are.

I flew the second battery to about 16 mins and landed it. The battery meter showed it was just about the perfect draw down. One of the guys was nice enough to recharge my two batteries on his four way. Lesson: always bring my charger even if I only think I'm going to fly the batteries I have charged. Flying can be addictive.

After another break and watching some more fun flying, I went up for my third and final flight. I was starting to feel pretty comfortable and was taking the plane farther away and bringing it back. A couple times, when the plane was quite a way out I got a little turned around as to whether the plane was in a turn away from me or toward me. This was partly due to the stiff wind sometimes grabbing the up wing on turns and pulling the plane around. The white plane, against a hazy sky was hard to make out at a distance. I was able to work it out because I had some altitude but I think I'm going to find some bright day-glo tape and put it on one of the wings.

On that last flight I tried to work on some specific skills including tighter turns, aileron+rudder turns and even a little no-throttle sailing into the wind. Since things were going so well, I even tried three loops and they went fine. Several of the guys were commenting that I was doing great for a beginner. I think that was largely due to the SkyS being a really gentle plane to learn on as well as the time I put in on the simulator. As I was getting near the end of the battery (estimated, since I couldn't see my phone), I started practicing some low and slow pass bys to get used to setting up for landing. As I did my last one and was about to bring it around for final, the engine cut out right as my phone alarm started vibrating on my belt signaling 16 minutes. Fortunately I was only twenty feet off the ground, low and slow over that forgiving scrub brush. No problem other than a bit longer walk through the brush than I'd planned.

Things I learned:

- An ideal flying location is crucial to success.
- While learning it would be good to put some high visibility markings on the plane to clearly see orientation at a distance.
- Get a battery meter
- Get a timer
- Safe flying time is 15 minutes (2200 3s in a brushless stock RTF with 6x4e prop)
- Flying the SkyS is fun!
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Last edited by Markran; Aug 20, 2011 at 05:33 PM.
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 05:40 PM
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Markran's Avatar
United States, CA, Sacramento
Joined Aug 2011
588 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott page View Post
1. Prof already pointed out that this is probably because you turned off the TX before unplugging the battery. I agree and want to add, "DON'T DO THAT" If the receiver has no signal the motor may start on it's own - sometimes due to a "failsafe" setting, other times ??? So what if you airplane flys off. That's not the worry - it's those spinning knives that can start up unpredictably with the TX off. Don't make me post the pictures of my buddies 70 stitches in his hand and arm with a severed artery and exposed bone.
I also highly recommend you install a switch or see if you can set tour TX to lock out the throttle -- sometimes called throttle cut, sometimes called throttle function, sometimes not available - in which case put a switch on it.
Thanks for the advice. It had never explicitly occurred to me to keep the transmitter radio on as I walk out to the landed plane. I've already had a close call with the prop when I accidentally leaned the stick against my body while holding the transmitter under one arm and the plane with the other. My hand was uncomfortably close to the propeller when it fired up. I'm treating it like a gun now. If the battery is plugged in, just pretend the prop is already spinning and act accordingly. The idea of a throttle kill switch sounds like an excellent one, however I imagine this is something that the RTF transmitter does not have (without hacking it in).
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 06:06 PM
Row 0, Seat A
G550Ted's Avatar
Savannah, GA
Joined Jan 2008
2,705 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markran View Post
Thanks for the advice. It had never explicitly occurred to me to keep the transmitter radio on as I walk out to the landed plane. I've already had a close call with the prop when I accidentally leaned the stick against my body while holding the transmitter under one arm and the plane with the other. My hand was uncomfortably close to the propeller when it fired up. I'm treating it like a gun now. If the battery is plugged in, just pretend the prop is already spinning and act accordingly. The idea of a throttle kill switch sounds like an excellent one, however I imagine this is something that the RTF transmitter does not have (without hacking it in).
It's really not necessary to go hog-eye-ee with switches and doodads (and you WILL forget to hit a switch some time). Just make it an iron-clad self-rule that the battery will always be disconnected unless you are ready to fly or do some test. So, after that greaser of a landing, and after you parade out to pick up your not-so-swept-wing beauty pop the canopy and pull the plugs before you waltz it back to the flight line. Only takes a couple of seconds. No fancy radio required.

Ted
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 06:40 PM
Why so serious?
2500GENE's Avatar
United States, FL, Cape Coral
Joined Dec 2007
5,972 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by G550Ted View Post
It's really not necessary to go hog-eye-ee with switches and doodads (and you WILL forget to hit a switch some time). Just make it an iron-clad self-rule that the battery will always be disconnected unless you are ready to fly or do some test. So, after that greaser of a landing, and after you parade out to pick up your not-so-swept-wing beauty pop the canopy and pull the plugs before you waltz it back to the flight line. Only takes a couple of seconds. No fancy radio required.

Ted
I always find it amazing the radio manufactures don't put a throttle lock switch on their radios. I have been using 2 Hitec Optic 6 radios for years and they have a throttle lock button that is real easy to get used to and miss having it when I use my DX5e on my smaller stuff. You would think it would be common sense to have it on all radios.
I bet this is all Cliff's fault.
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 07:04 PM
Earthbound Skyhound
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United States, NC, Richlands
Joined Jun 2011
4,709 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markran
... After the last landing, as I walked up to the plane I heard a regular beep every 3 seconds or so. I had the engine off and I unplugged the battery as it was my last flight anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by StarHopper44 View Post
I haven't encountered the every-3-second beep, so can't say. My Rx does beep every 30 seconds though (in case your '3' is a typo)....but I don't know exactly what the beep's supposed to be signaling - I guessed it's just to signal it's 'On'....maybe bound? Anybody know for sure & can share the info?
So which was it - 3 secs or 30? Going by something I've read, if 3, you might be getting some kind of error message or alarm.
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 07:08 PM
Argue for your limitations
ajbaker's Avatar
Lincoln, CA
Joined Oct 2006
8,422 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by yannc View Post
I'm going to correct myself, I built this plane long time ago and I forgot
I use the 6x4E that everybody is using.
That makes a difference. Then, use a 30A ESC or put the ESC on the outside of the plane. For the purists, you could also use a BEC.
AJ
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 07:13 PM
Argue for your limitations
ajbaker's Avatar
Lincoln, CA
Joined Oct 2006
8,422 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by yannc View Post
"V2 has a hidden and completely internal compartment for the weight. Hold it up to a strong light and look for a dark area right up front in the nose.
You might pry the fuse halves apart with some warmth and patience to separate the stickum.
I have a V1.
Cliff"

This is confusing me. When the V2 was released, it was said that it didn't have the washers or weights in the nose. Mine came glued in so I couldn't see anything. I could find some tips about how to remove the washers on a V1 but I didn't see anything about removing ballast on a V2.

Before I start the surgery procedure, can somebody with a V2 confirm that there is something, and where about it is located? I will just do a cut to get it out and glue the foam piece back in.
DO NOT cut the fuselage. It is not necessary. Take a table knife (dull) and tease the front of the fuselage apart to separate it (go slow). It is just double sided scotch tape. You will find the weight about 1" behind the tip of the nose and nestled very nicely in an enclosed hole which is ~ 1" in diameter. Then, after removal, use regular CA (not foam safe) to glue the nose back together. It will look perfect.
Lately, it has been a slug of steel that they use. When you take yours out, please take a picture of it for my library (if I don't already have one). TIA.
AJ
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Old Aug 20, 2011, 07:16 PM
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RootCanalGuy's Avatar
Joined Aug 2010
88 Posts
Fatal crash: where for help ?

Hello AJ,
I found this thread very helpful and as a result successfully built very quality SkyS as platform for FPV; I had a fatal crash two days ago due to signal issues after fully loading the plane with electronics; where is the proper place for me to present the scenario & post for feedback ?
thank you
RC-Guy
RootCanal-Guy
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