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ElectriFly Evader Review

Sleek, fast and nimble, the Electrifly Evader sport jet is sure to keep you on your toes and test your eyesight!

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Introduction


Wing span:26.5in (675mm)
Length:30.5in (775 mm)
Wing area:153in² (9.9 dm²)
Weight:28 - 30oz
Servos:2x Futaba S3156
Receiver:4+ channel
Battery:4s 2200mah ElectriFly
Motor:Ammo™
24-45-3790
Fan Unit:Hyperflow™ 56mm
ESC:Silver series 35A
Manufacturer:ElectriFly
Available From:Tower Hobbies
MSRP:$179.99

If you haven't had the opportunity to see a sport jet fly, whether it be electric powered or turbine, let me tell you you're missing out! Sport jets are known for their blazing speed and aerobatic prowess which naturally make them crowd pleasers and a huge hit at airshows or funflys. You might be suprised with all that speed and agility just how much fun these planes are to fly and just how easy they can be once you get past the initial jitters. If sleek lines, high speed and agility sounds like something you might be interested in, the ElectriFly Evader might be just the ticket for you. With a top speed in excess of 100mph in straight and level flight out of the box and its bright colors I'm certain it will keep you on your toes and turn a few heads both in the air and on the ground.

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Kit Contents

My Evader came very well packaged, and nothing was damaged in transit. Opening the box and removing the components took 5 minutes or so as everything was so well taped in place. The first thing I wanted to see, and was very impressed with, was the quality of the glass work on the fuselage and its overall thickness. It seems very solid without tons of weight. The paint is very nice, and I personally love the orange and white color scheme. The ailerons are pre-installed, and covering on both the wings and tail surfaces had just a few visible bubbles/wrinkles but nothing the iron can't take care of in quick order. As I continued to dig through the box, I noticed the familiar shiny gold can of the brushless Ammo inrunner motor and a Hyperflow 56mm fan unit. Also included are a bungee launcher, a laser cut plane stand and just about every other major piece of hardware needed to complete the kit (push rods, landing skids, bungee hook, etc.). The Evader's manual is very well laid out, contains pictures and text descriptions of each step of the build process and is easy to read. The included decal sheet allows for the plane to be finished in either as a sport jet or in a military scheme.

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Kit includes/features:

  • Pre-painted fiberglass fuselage
  • Pre-installed ailerons
  • Pre-hinged elevator
  • Magnetic canopy
  • Hyperflow 56mm fan
  • Ammo 24-45-3790 inrunner motor
  • Decal sheet
  • Bungee launcher
  • Laser-cut plane stand
  • Instruction manual

Kit requirements:

  • 35A+ ESC
  • 2x micro servos
  • 4+ channel Receiver
  • 4s 2200mah lipo

Provided for review

I powered my Evader with the components recommended by Great Planes. This included an ElectriFly 35A Silver Series ESC, 2x Futaba S3156 micro servos and an ElectriFly 4s 2200mah 25C LiPo battery to feed the already included Ammo brushless inrunner motor. Everything was controlled via a Futaba R617FS 7 channel 2.4ghz FAAST receiver. Deans connectors are already in place on the ESC and battery, as well as bullet plugs on both ends of the motor wires, so no soldering was required, another nice perk of using the recommended power system.

 

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Assembly

The Evader comes in a high state of pre-fabrication so all that remains is some assembly but no real building. No special tools were used in my build of the Evader which is always nice. Having the provided plane stand is a nice touch, and it proved to be quite handy a few times during the assembly phase. It took me about 5 evenings before the Evader was ready to fly, including time to take pictures and take notes for the article.

Plane Stand

Now, maybe it's just me, but I really like the idea that a kit comes with its own stand custom tailored to its shape so it's not always slipping about when you're trying to swap out packs or when it's in the back of the car on the way to the flying field. The stand is made of laser-cut plywood, consists of 5 pieces and is simply assembled like a jigsaw puzzle and then glued together with thin CA.



Power system assembly/install

When I build EDFs, I normally like to start with the heart of the beast. It helps to motivate me tp see the project to completion: It must be something about the sound of a nicely balanced fan. Assembly of the Hyperflow fan unit starts by enlarging the plastic fan housing to accommodate the brass fan adapter and allow future access to the motor. I strongly recommend using blue loctite on all of your motor mount screws and set screws, especially in an EDF application because they are prone to vibrate loose (be careful not to get any loctite on the plastic as it can cause a reaction and weaken your fan unit). Some light sanding of the fan housing and cone adapter are required to get a nice fit, but nothing some medium grit sand paper and a couple of minutes can't cure. Once I verified the cone's orientation, I glude it in place with thin CA and attached the "flange" or "lip" with CA as well.

Once I completed the fan, I ran it up to verify smoothness of operation and direction of rotation. I do not recommend running the fan in your hand with any decent amount of power behind it. Either wait until it's installed in the airframe to run the fan up to its full potential or build yourself a test stand.

Installing the completed fan is one of those things that just takes time. There is a method to the madness, and I STRONGLY suggest that you attempt it a few times without glue to get the hang of it. I dropped the rear of the fan down into the fuselage and let the front rotate into place. I aligned my motor wires in the pre-slotted guide at the top of the fuse and slid the whole assembly back until it met the pre-installed tail cone in the fuselage. Once I felt confident that I had the hang of the process, I mixed up some 30 minute epoxy and sealed it in place. Then I mounted the ESC and connected it up to the motor to complete the install. My initial run ups on the fan once installed in the fuselage showed a burst of ~540W @ 35A on the wattmeter.

 





Wing

Wing assembly starts with installing the wing dowel and the wing bolt down plate. I outlined the bolt down plate with washable ink, then removed the covering from the identified area and finally glued it into place on the bare wood. I like to use epoxy just to be certain the bond is strong and will hold up to future abuse. The single aileron servo mounts inside a plate as well, and mounting it required more trimming of covering and gluing the plate into place. The servo attaches to the plate with the traditional screw method, and as usual, don't forget to reinforce those screw holes with thin CA! It really does make a difference. I installed the horns onto the torque rods protruding from the wing and finished up the install with the provided rod, and quick connectors.

 

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Fuselage

There really is not much to be done with the fuselage other than installing the elevator servo, applying the decals and gluing in the optional battery tray. The manual states that their testing has proven that the plate is not necessary, but for those who feel compelled to use it, it's nice Great Planes decided to include it. The servo mounts in the traditional fashion inside a servo tray within the fuselage. The elevator pushrods join together and slip through the single easy connector so that only the single servo is needed. I've tugged and pulled on the linkage trying to get it to slip, and it won't budge. It seems to be a fairly robust setup. Should you decide to use the battery tray, you'll need to drill a hole for the trays screw and remove a "window" from the battery plate. Otherwise, simply lay down some velcro on the plate and call it a day. I opted to go the latter route since it really does appear the pack is secured well.

 

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Tail

The vertical stab is pre-molded into the fiberglass fuselage so there is no work required there, but I did feel it's worth noting so that those looking for a rudder won't be surprised. Fitting the horizontal stab starts by sliding it into place and viewing the model from the front and rear to verify that the stab is level with the wing. Mine wasn't perfectly level, and as recommended in the manual, I simply added a little weight to the high side of the stab to bring it back into line. Once I verified the stab was centered and squared up, Use thin CA sparingly where the stab meets the fuselage to finalize its position or you might find yourself in my position: using stickers to cover up your mess. I hinged and installed the elevators but didn't glue them yet. Using the mounting plate from the control horn as a guide, I marked the location where I would need to drill 2 3/32" holes to mount the horn. Once the holes were drilled I hooked up the pushrod and installed the control horns. Then I simply slipped the elevator hinges into their pre-slotted holes and glued into place.

 



Radio Installation

I installed the Futaba R617FS receiver just forward of the wing in the battery tray area using the provided velcro strips. 2" strips of plastic are provided which you can use to pass the receiver wire(s) through. Depending upon your type of receiver (72mhz or 2.4ghz) the required length of tubing will vary. For my 2.4ghz install, I simply cut the tubing in half and secured it to the inside of the fuselage with a small amount of thin CA.

 

Completion

Before the Evader could be officially ready to maiden there were just a few remaining steps. First, I attached the bungee hook, which couldn't have been much easier. I removed the covering over the bungee hook hole, reinforced the area around it with some CA and screwed the hook into place. Once the hook was installed, the landing skids needed to be glued into place to prevent any adverse ground handling characteristics. Just as with the wing plate, I removed the covering under the skids and then glued them into place. Finally, I checked the CG and my control surface throws. With the Evader completed and ready to fly the AUW was right at 28.1 ounces.

 

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Flying

Basics

The Evader is small and quick. If you're looking into getting this plane, make sure you're ready for a little bit of eye strain and adrenaline! Flying the plane is not difficult. By nature it's a very pattern-like airframe in the sense that it goes where you point it. But with a wingspan of some where in the 27" range it can get small in a hurry if you're not ready for it. Overall, the Evader flies very smoothly with a very polished feel to it while the Hyperflow fan makes plenty of power and really sounds great in the air. So far both the Evaders I have seen fly sounded very smooth, were very quiet in the air and have proven to be surprisingly resistant to crash damage.

Taking Off and Landing

Takeoff

Utilizing the included bungee launcher, you should have no issues what so ever getting your Evader into the air. For your first few flights have an assistant launch the plane for you, but once the plane is trimmed out, one person can easily launch the plane by himself. Just to be on the safe side, I've been launching mine closer to 30 paces instead of the 25 in the manual. Once the plane was on the hook and ready to go, I set the throttle to full and gave the plane a nice level underhanded toss. I suggest using low rates on the ailerons as even at low speeds the stock throws keep them very effective. Once clear of the hook, be sure you either throttle back or start your turn early if you stay on the pipe... the Evader gets small quick!!

Landing

Landing the Evader is not all that difficult, but I do find myself still being fooled by how much speed it's really carrying on approach even after 25 or so flights. I recommend flying out of a fairly large field with the Evader to allow you to make a more scale, stabilized approach (longer) as well as allow you to overshoot your landing point some should you come in a little hot or high with out worrying about it so much. The trickiest bit to landing the Evader is getting comfortable slowing it down. I chop my throttle on my downwind leg and let the plane coast all the way to the threshold if I make the approach just right. I've noticed that as the plane slows down, the elevator loses a bit of effectiveness (which, if you're not expecting it, can add a little pucker factor). Make sure you're on elevator high rates on finals, and just keep modulating the elevator to maintain a nice descent. Unless you fly from the smoothest of fields, don't be surprised if the Evader grabs in the grass a bit, but don't worry: It's light enough that on the few occasions it has happened to me, it's left no observable damage.

Aerobatics/Special Flight Performance

The roll rates on the Evader are very very quick and suprisingly axial. Inverted flight is a no-brainer, and the vertical performance is incredible. Sustained climbs have the plane dotted out within just a few seconds due to its speed and overall size, but once the plane is at altitude you can really see how fast it moves out as it chews up ground at a pretty good pace. You'll definitely want to make sure you stay ahead of the Evader or you'll end up being flown by it!

Is This For a Beginner?

The Evader is most certainly NOT for the beginner.

Durability

Eventually it's bound to happen... the dreaded not-so-perfect landing. I've made a couple now with the Evader, and I've been surprised how well the fiberglass fuselage has held up. I hit LVC on a recent flight and ended up stalling the plane about 10 - 15ft off the ground. The results were some cracks in the fuselage but nothing that couldn't be repaired by wicking some thin CA in them and using a little white touchup paint to hide my repairs.

Flight Video/Photo Gallery

 




 




 




 




Downloads

Evader twin launch  101.74 MB

Conclusion

With the performance the Evader has on tap and at its price point, I think it's got to be on any mid-level and above EDF pilot's radar. It looks awesome, hauls butt, sounds great and doesn't cost much to get into the air. It can be constructed in one evening, and the very complete hardware package with the kit is of really nice quality. While I must admit I was a bit intimidated on the first flight or two, the Evader quickly proved all my concerns were unwarranted with its stability and predictable flight behavior. If I had any one single piece of advice to offer it would be: Dont blink!

Likes:

  • Hotrod performance
  • Quick assembly
  • Great handling

Dislikes:

  • Covering had/has quite a few bubbles and/or wrinkles
  • 3D Pilot figure (but at 100mph who is gonna see it?)

Last edited by Angela H; Jun 18, 2010 at 09:19 AM..

Discussion

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Old Jun 21, 2010, 09:29 PM
Registered User
Evan D's Avatar
Charlotte, NC
Joined Jan 2004
5,262 Posts
Excellent review. I maidened mine today and have to say it is an excellent flyer. I've flown alot of S400 and F5D pylon planes and was expecting this to have a never ending glide like they do, I was plesantly surprised that the Evader does slow quickly to a nice stable landing speed.

I've got another on order already for a back up... great little jet.
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Old Jun 21, 2010, 09:29 PM
BadPilot
badpilotto's Avatar
United States, IL, Downers Grove
Joined Nov 2007
1,705 Posts
Don,

Great review! That is a very beautiful plane. When you said fast I was not ready for the speed shown on the video. Really nice pics of the plane too but I do agree with you on the cheesy 2D pilot pic.

John
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Old Jun 21, 2010, 09:33 PM
BadPilot
badpilotto's Avatar
United States, IL, Downers Grove
Joined Nov 2007
1,705 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan D View Post
Excellent review. I maidened mine today and have to say it is an excellent flyer. I've flown alot of S400 and F5D pylon planes and was expecting this to have a never ending glide like they do, I was plesantly surprised that the Evader does slow quickly to a nice stable landing speed.

I've got another on order already for a back up... great little jet.
Even,

LOL, I am glad to hear others purchase planes as I do. I will buy several if I like the plane. Not only due to crash loss but also the manufacturers seem to stop producing them after awhile.

John
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Old Jun 22, 2010, 04:35 PM
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Evan D's Avatar
Charlotte, NC
Joined Jan 2004
5,262 Posts
I find it odd that manufacturers stop making really good flying planes for no reason. There were two parts of the build I found difficult. First even heating up the brass impeller part and freezing the motor shaft the brass piece did not want to go on. The second issue kicked my but, finding the blind nut for the tow hook. Looking at the picture I gentle pulled back the covering and there was no hole. I poked around were I thought it should be and couldn't find it. Finally I cut the covering back and took a pin a probed around an found it quite aft of were I thought it would be. The was no hole... It would have been nice to have the hole marked some way.
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 12:28 PM
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jimbogreek's Avatar
Charleston, SC
Joined Mar 2010
15 Posts
Great review. I got mine at the local hobby shop about a month ago, went together real quick. Didn't have any issues with it, even the impeller went on the motor real easy...might be a tolerance thing. Flies really good, I might get another one as a backup also. One thing I would do is place a drop of CA on the servo horn kwik links, that little plastic black button seemed loose after the maiden.
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Old Jun 23, 2010, 01:02 PM
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Evan D's Avatar
Charlotte, NC
Joined Jan 2004
5,262 Posts
Don't use the links in the kit, use Z bends on both ends. Also put a dab of CA on the torque rod links on the ailerons (the grey pieces) so they can't rotate. Aslo the torque arms where they go in the ailerons should get some CA as they got loose and I had some play in one of my ailerons after just one flight.
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Old Jun 24, 2010, 10:54 AM
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Joined Jan 2008
61 Posts
Nice review, I thought it be the same size as the Kyosho Illusion jet, but it's Much larger closer to the size of Pirahna or Sniper.

Kirt R
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Old Jun 25, 2010, 08:52 AM
life is an oyster. shuck it!
istandalone's Avatar
bennington, VT
Joined Mar 2008
3,183 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan D View Post
I find it odd that manufacturers stop making really good flying planes for no reason. There were two parts of the build I found difficult. First even heating up the brass impeller part and freezing the motor shaft the brass piece did not want to go on. The second issue kicked my but, finding the blind nut for the tow hook. Looking at the picture I gentle pulled back the covering and there was no hole. I poked around were I thought it should be and couldn't find it. Finally I cut the covering back and took a pin a probed around an found it quite aft of were I thought it would be. The was no hole... It would have been nice to have the hole marked some way.
if it's a metal blind nut, then move a magnet around on top of the covering until you feel it.
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Old Jun 25, 2010, 09:10 AM
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Evan D's Avatar
Charlotte, NC
Joined Jan 2004
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Good idea!!
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Old Jun 25, 2010, 09:38 AM
life is an oyster. shuck it!
istandalone's Avatar
bennington, VT
Joined Mar 2008
3,183 Posts
oh i having such a hard time not ordering one of these. the only thing that stops me is i'll need new lipos...i only have 4000mah 4s packs. might be a tad heavy for a smaller edf like this.
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Old Jun 25, 2010, 10:32 AM
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Evan D's Avatar
Charlotte, NC
Joined Jan 2004
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yes, too heavy and too large.
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Old Jun 25, 2010, 11:08 PM
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Glendale, AZ
Joined Jun 2009
215 Posts
Don, Great review. Was that filmed in Fremont, CA?
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Old Jun 25, 2010, 11:14 PM
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United States, CA, Petaluma
Joined Sep 2004
13,500 Posts
The first video was shot at Baylands. The second video was a North Bay locale.
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Old Jun 26, 2010, 09:06 PM
6 months to finish a rtf
pulsery2k1's Avatar
upstate ny
Joined Jun 2003
1,829 Posts
very nice model we have one

good: speed really move's

bad to small hard to see

bad the need to bungy launch

should have made it 70 mm sized with at least a 35+ " ws
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