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Old Oct 18, 2012, 06:29 AM
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DeathWarmedUp's Avatar
Australia, QLD, Gympie
Joined Jul 2007
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Originally Posted by rcflyinff View Post
Could you please explain the reason to cut down the shafts to use these props. Thanks....Doug
Its so he can use Prop Adapters like these:
http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s..._Type_3MM.html

Not sure if thats the same one but it is for a 3mm shaft.
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 05:53 PM
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bettsmums's Avatar
Jacksonville, FL
Joined Jan 2006
187 Posts
Cutting the Motor Shaft

You have to cut down the motor shaft to make props fit closer to the motor. The collet adapters only have so much depth inside. When the adapter hits the end of the shaft that's it. You can measure the depth of the center hole and that will tell you how long the shaft should be after you cut it.
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 12:03 AM
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Joined Aug 2004
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Here's mine, in Capital Airlines colors from the 1950s.

I've been around the full-size since the 1960s, I've flown the big one about 1,000 hours so I'm very fussy about how close to scale a model should be. The Dynam version is very close. The main improvement I made was replacing the kit cowls with the Dynam PBY cowls (actually Park Plastics upgrade versions.) They have engine detail molded in and are very close to correct for an R-1830 powered DC-3. I got rid of the ridiculous amount of down thrust and the prop centers very nicely now in the cowl. I did the steerable tailwheel mod but used a separate servo mixed with the rudder for less travel, much easier to takeoff now. The real DC-3 tailwheel didn't "steer" it castered for turns because you unlocked it. For Takeoff and landing it was locked straight ahead.

Flies great it had a little climb under power until I mixed about 10% down elevator with power on. I fly it right down to the runway then slowly reduce thrust works great I've even looped, rolled and spun it . it flies well floating arund the sky
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 04:20 AM
The sky is the limit
BAF23's Avatar
Belgium, Vlaams Gewest, Hasselt
Joined Aug 2012
208 Posts
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 04:27 AM
The sky is the limit
BAF23's Avatar
Belgium, Vlaams Gewest, Hasselt
Joined Aug 2012
208 Posts
Pookielips, that's a beauty (except for the horrible kit mainwheels). I'm glad to read the elimination of the huge downtrust of the motor works well when coupled with a 10 percent elevator mix. On the forum I had read that 14 degree down was essential for this model. I take it from you (as a fellow real DC3 pilot) that it flies well without, and will modify mine soon (with your suggested dummy cowlings as well).

I remember handling the (real) aircraft during taxi on those long often curving taxitracks of military and civilian modern airports (mid 90's in Belgium) required lots of use of that tailwheel lock handle, well placed under the throttle quadrant. For any straight stretch I engaged the lock to spare the brakes (differential steering), but to do so required the wheel to be perfectly straight to allow the vertical pin to lower in the bracket (for which you had to use one brake or the other during crosswind). During calm days differential throttle was sufficient to engage but it all could be done using one hand, the other remaining free to put elevator and aileron in the correct position to cater for the wind gusts. It kept you busy and is a delicate art not thought anymore to the gameboy generation pilots looking at their colour tv screens in the cockpit.

That DC3 definitely was developed with large square grass fields in mind and not for rigorously following yellow lines for miles. I loved to fly it till the owner regrettably had to sell it because after the crash of the Dutch Dakota Association DC3 in the ijselmeer (killing all 33 aboard) we were prohibited from carrying revenue passengers (historic flights) with a US registered airplane (N49AG) as a Belgian business, and the Belgian FAA refused to register it as a civilian airplane because it was in fact a C53 and was not on the eligible list. It now flies out of France, with an American pilot/owner and two extremely old but experienced French DC3 pilots mostly at the controls.

People still cannot be given a taste of 30's airliners because the European flying authorities since some time deny the use of the DC3 as a passenger carrying plane unless it complies to modern regulation. The emergency aisle lights would have been easy to install, but how about an emergency inflating slide from the door behind the cockpit? Modern times and bureaucracy plus excessive safety rules (like labels: don't put the cat in the microwave to dry) are driving all little pleasures away. At least we still can operate our scale models to keep some nostalgic moments alive.

Happy landings, Laurence
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 11:52 AM
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United States, WV, St Albans
Joined Jul 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pookielips1954 View Post
Here's mine, in Capital Airlines colors from the 1950s.

I've been around the full-size since the 1960s, I've flown the big one about 1,000 hours so I'm very fussy about how close to scale a model should be. The Dynam version is very close. The main improvement I made was replacing the kit cowls with the Dynam PBY cowls (actually Park Plastics upgrade versions.) They have engine detail molded in and are very close to correct for an R-1830 powered DC-3. I got rid of the ridiculous amount of down thrust and the prop centers very nicely now in the cowl. I did the steerable tailwheel mod but used a separate servo mixed with the rudder for less travel, much easier to takeoff now. The real DC-3 tailwheel didn't "steer" it castered for turns because you unlocked it. For Takeoff and landing it was locked straight ahead.

Flies great it had a little climb under power until I mixed about 10% down elevator with power on. I fly it right down to the runway then slowly reduce thrust works great I've even looped, rolled and spun it . it flies well floating arund the sky
Pookie
Neat looking airplane. Good job painting and lettering the gal. Did you fly for Capitol?

I liked seeing the Capitol livery because when I researched my DC-3 I found it had a rather diverse and lengthy history. It was ordered by Braniff just prior to the war, but diverted to the military and remained a passenger plane in OD green, designated C-50 rather than C-47. After the war it ended up belonging to Capital Airlines. Around 1955 it was leased, then sold to the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad as their first corporate plane. (At a time when railroads were struggling to keep a share of the passenger traffic being lost to cars and airlines) The C&O contracted service and flight crews from Capitol.

I find learning about the planes nearly as much fun as flying them.

Jim
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 12:19 PM
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Joined Aug 2004
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Laurence - I remember the DDA accident very well, as I was flying the Piedmont Airlines DC-3 for a museum in Charlotte at the time. Sad story as you know. This is one airplane you don't want to stall, especially at low altitudes.

My 1,000 hours included low level insecticide spraying and later a scheduled commuter airline in Florida. The DC-3 was my first type rating, now I'm just a Gameboy Airbus 320 guy as you put it ha, ha! But I can relive the glory days with this great hobby of ours! Are you currently flying anything; just curious.

Jim - I've admired your beautiful work for quite sometime. Love the silver Mylar on yours. I did the Capital scheme frankly because I don't remember anyone else doing it (that's the way I operate.) Sent Callie Graphics a scan of a 1/48 Capital DC-3 decal and she did her usual fantastic job. I was planning to paint the bottom half of the fuselage silver but had trouble with the white coming off the EPO, even after de-stickfying the blue tape on my shirt. No, I didn't fly for Capital - they merged with United in 1961 when I was six! But being a student of aviation history I'm very familar with them; they were the fifth largest U.S. airline after AA, UA, TW and EA.

I just flew it again this morning and mixing the rudder with the tailwheel servo really helps the takeoff because I have much reduced the total tailwheel throw. I'm going to try some expo next.

Russ Farris
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 01:02 PM
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beautiful, picturesque Southern New Jersey, USA
Joined Dec 2008
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Russ- your Capital model looks outstanding! As a boy, I flew on similar looking ex-Capital Viscounts several times before United painted them over after the merger. I still have a couple of big red Capital ramp umbrellas Dad brought home when they sold them off at work. When I went to work at United, I remember someone looked at my employee number and asked, "Are you ex-Capital?" I was way too young, but I knew what he meant by that, (my employee number starts with an "8" which most of the ex-Cap people had at United).

I wonder if you flew the PI DC-3 when it came to PHL? I was all over that beautiful plane but unfortunately, didn't get a chance to ride it. Probably for the best, because when I see and hear those round engines fire up on an old airliner, it always moves me to tears.
-Burt
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 01:08 PM
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United States, FL
Joined Mar 2012
571 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLYBOB54 View Post
For motors I use 2408-21s AKA BP-21s, plenty of power on 3S and cheap as chips.
Where are you from? My son purchased his plane that looks exactly like yours at a swap meet/show in Deland FL a few weeks ago.
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 03:58 PM
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United States, NC, Rocky Mt
Joined Oct 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BladeHead View Post
I wonder if you flew the PI DC-3 when it came to PHL? I was all over that beautiful plane but unfortunately, didn't get a chance to ride it. Probably for the best, because when I see and hear those round engines fire up on an old airliner, it always moves me to tears.
-Burt
Speaking of Piedmont DC-3's One more day and mine is done!!! This was taken last week I have added 4 or 5 more details and should be complete this weekend. My blog explains the rest.
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Old Oct 19, 2012, 05:54 PM
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United Kingdom, England, Lincs
Joined Apr 2011
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Wow, you guys have customised some beautiful planes.

Really green with envy here.

EG
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Old Oct 20, 2012, 02:00 AM
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Australia, TAS, Wynyard
Joined Sep 2012
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The Dynam Dak collection just keeps growing!
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Old Oct 20, 2012, 06:46 AM
The sky is the limit
BAF23's Avatar
Belgium, Vlaams Gewest, Hasselt
Joined Aug 2012
208 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by pookielips1954 View Post
Laurence - I remember the DDA accident very well, as I was flying the Piedmont Airlines DC-3 for a museum in Charlotte at the time. Sad story as you know. This is one airplane you don't want to stall, especially at low altitudes.

My 1,000 hours included low level insecticide spraying and later a scheduled commuter airline in Florida. The DC-3 was my first type rating, now I'm just a Gameboy Airbus 320 guy as you put it ha, ha! But I can relive the glory days with this great hobby of ours! Are you currently flying anything; just curious.
Russ Farris
Hi Russ, The reason of DDA DC3 crash was a malfunctioning in the prop governor. After their engine failed at 1000ft they feathered the prop but it kept unfeathering by itself, continuously cycling, causing the aircraft uncontrolled yaw movements and unable to maintain altitude. Dutch ATC aggravated the situation by having them switch frequencies and squawk while they tried to control the aircraft and understand why the prop didn't stay feathered. Minimum control speed is rather different for a feathered or unfeathered prop and that's how they would end up in the water no matter what they did (with that prop problem). It was very hazy that day and they ended up not far from the shoreline in just a couple of feet of water, the airplane looking rather intact only half submerged, but unfortunately nobody survived.

Next day I flew a long before planned flight in our DC3 with journalists over Belgium and France to overfly all exixting Kinepolis locations with a nice lunch at Luxemburg. Some journalists didn't want to board, and others were more interested talking to the crew about the DDA accident and risks of carrying people in antique aircraft, as to the commercial aspect of the Kinepolis sponsored promotion flight. Soon after, our commercial operation ceased and I went on obtaining my B25 Mitchel rating on my US ATP, displaying N320SQ from Eindhoven to a variety of European countries.

In 2000 I quit flying after a near death experience with a US registered GAF22 Nomad during single pilot paradrop operations. During a drop of students (second automatic opening) from 2300 feet I experienced a catastrophic uncontained turbine explosion, shearing everything leading forward of the turbine. That must have been the reason my prop couldn't be feathered either. Huge flames were trailing close to the door through which the dispatcher professionally hooked the 14 remaining students in turn to parachute into safety. I did my best to maintain the aircraft as steady as possible during the shallow turn and powered glide back to the field. The 2 dispatchers jumped at only 1000 ft and had molted aluminum all over their clothes because at that moment the remains of the engine just broke off, but the prop got stuck in the gearpod so the burning engine didn't shear off, but hung at a 90°down angle . Structural integrity of the wing and strut plus controlability became more than marginal and I opted to quickly put the aircraft down on an Army tank training zone. At the end of the rollout I reached a grass clearing and turned the aircraft so the wind would blow the flames away from the fuselage. I got out through the co-pilot door and ran away, expecting the fuel tanks to explode. They didn't and below you see a picture of me standing next to the aircraft the next day. The engine was sent to the USA and the cause of the accident was identified as failure of the owner/chief pilot/FAA mechanic/FAA certified inspector (yes, all one person) to monitor known haircracks into the turbine as discovered by the factory before delivery (it had been a factory test and demonstration aircraft till purchased and operated by the new owner for 7 years without ever looking in the turbine).

I got disgusted and considered my bag of luck to be empty after this unfortunate happening. I quit flying next day and have changed my life completely since. I picked up r/c flying two years ago (after a 20 year break) and am busy writing a book about my aviation career with 10.000 landings in 87 aircraft types, out of which I captained 37 types varying from antique Grunau Baby gliders via 1000 hours F104 to F16 and instructor rating on aerobatic Stampe SV4 and a variety of Jets, props and turboprops, member of and even leading a jet formation team during airshows, and captained many flights with members of our royal family and a multitude of government ministers. My scale models are copies of the real ones wearing markings of the aircraft I flew for real, that's enough for me now, I have other interest in life.
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Old Oct 20, 2012, 07:08 AM
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United States, TX, Johnson City
Joined Mar 2005
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Yes BAF23 I would say you used up all nine lives that day, it sounds that with great amount of luck the airplane staying together and great flying skills you beat death that day.
Ken Smith
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Old Oct 20, 2012, 09:35 AM
Chop it, cut it, bash it
quitcherbitchen's Avatar
United States, CA, La Cañada Flintridge
Joined Jul 2011
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BAF, do you ever wish you had taken more pictures of the planes you flew.
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