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Old Nov 18, 2010, 10:23 AM
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IndyMatt, my P51 came in much lighter than the Zero (see pics from an earlier post of mine). I used a double layer of 1mm balsa wood for my mount, coated it with a thin layer of epoxy, and drilled holes in it to make it lighter. It is more than strong enough, and way lighter than plywood.
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 11:24 AM
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I bet that Balsa mount it superlight! The lamination should add some good strength too!
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 11:57 AM
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Especially if you place the grain of the second piece of balsa 90 degrees to the first!
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 12:31 PM
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Hey all,

Got 3 great maiden flights on my new zero this morning. Just wanted to relate to everyone a bit about my build and setup. I was not very careful at getting all the components forward in the fuselage, cuz I hadnt received my batteries yet and unsure of the size. Also I hate removing most of the wire off my ESC because I know I will reuse it in another plane.

FIRST NOTE: "super strong" rare earth magnets work great to hold the wing on, I wasnt looping but if you try them the strentgh will blow you away, you can barely pull the wing off and they weigh nothing. BUT, luckily the wing comes off when you hit the ground therefore the fuse is undamaged, even on my not so great landings. Just remember to Carve out (remove) some foam from the fuse with a hot-wire behind the wing, so that the wing can slide backwards no problem.

Anyways here's my setup that worked great, not crazy fast like some of the vids I have seen but plenty of power to get you out of trouble.

3-channel (I dont want to mess the weight of ailerons till I know I have a stable plane)

auw=133 gms (a bit heavy I guess?, since I had to add about 5 grams to the nose, I did so by gluing on the plastic nose shield, then adding a generous coat of epoxy to the entire nose, looks shiny and hopefully stronger, a little behind the nose is where these break).

Even after adding this thick layer of epoxy and extending it somewhat down the sides of the fuse toward the wing, I had to glue on a 2 gram plastic coated piece of wire to the front of the cowling....aargh!

I dont know how anyone uses a 10gm motor unless they are somehow jamming everything right against the front of the plane and using a heavy battery....seems silly.

Also I glued a "half skewer" (bbq skewers) to each side of the fuse from the nose to about the leading edge (where they break).

For added crashability I did my usual trick of using a sammich layer of "packing foam" right behind the tiny plywood firewall. and didnt glue the firewall to the fuse of course, but glued the rigid foam (behind squishy foam) to the fuse of course. U guys should give this a try.

Another NOTE: I didnt worry about adding any down or right thrust to my motor angle. So I am getting better thrust this way. In fact, it is perfectly lined up with the straight line of the fuselage and if anything is pointing a tiny bit left. I had no weird flight characteristics and hand launched super easy, just have about 1/2 to 2/3 max throttle, if you have full throttle on any bird hand launching you are asking for trouble. Wish I had the youtube link where this guy explains how to hand-launch. Wait till you are stable and flying straight before you give it acceleration, its like driving a fast car, you want to avoid sliding sideways.

Motor: 15gm 2200kv Turborix from R2 hobbies- turned out to be a pretty nice little motor, in retrospect I wish I got a 20 gm one for obvious reasons (see above)

Prop: 6x3 GWS.......a smaller diameter prop looks crazy on this bird, since the cowl is so fat, also if you go higher pitch on a 6-inch prop you lose thrust at low speed, so this works well when starting out, and perfect for that kv. For smaller props you need something crazy like 3000kv.

ESC: BPhobbies 10amp, these suck, and they're a overkill but I had one on a shelf that actually worked (surprised me).

servos: 3.8 gm tiny cheapo chinese jobs that are glitchy and weak, but it turns nicely.

Batteries: Rhino 360mah 2S...nice small shape.

One question, you guys that are flying 3S, what motors have you tried? I am very skeptical of any motor this small handling 3S for a long period of time, but I wouldnt mind making a faster bird.

Hope all this info helps someone, they're cool little planes and nicely done, I just wish they would extend the fuselage forward a bit. Scale planes are tough when you realize that the motors on the real airplanes were 1/3 of the total weight of the plane, and that's with fuel.
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 01:18 PM
TEAM HILLBILLY
Eagle34's Avatar
Pass Christian, MS
Joined Jan 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyMatt View Post
Has anyone had any luck with the above ESC?

What about a mount for the BL motors? Is everyone just using plywood? I really wanting to make this thing superlight so a lighter aluminum mount my be better.
Here is the one I'm using. The 6mm stick mount (blue one at the bottom.) Works real nice plus has heat sink fins built in. Just cut out some of the foam to get the proper down right thrust angle then epoxy in. http://lazertoyz.ncweb.net/10Gram.htm Don't know about those ESCs they just started carrying them, I'm sure when Giuseppi gets his in he will let us know. BTW i did receive an email from HK saying that the Turnigy 6A were back in stock, but when I checked they had already gone back to -7 in stock.
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 02:34 PM
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That is the one I think Joe was using let fuss but probably heavier than the balsa but based on the above build it seems like nose weight is a good thing.

What type of expoxies are used to glass the nose? I know some have used just one sheet of fiberglass fabric with water based poly urethane. I will be painting the inside of the entire fuselage with the polycrylic and glass from nose to wing joint.

Is there a guide of the particular weakspots for each warbird?
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 02:50 PM
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United States, CA, Felton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyMatt View Post
That is the one I think Joe was using let fuss but probably heavier than the balsa but based on the above build it seems like nose weight is a good thing.

What type of expoxies are used to glass the nose? I know some have used just one sheet of fiberglass fabric with water based poly urethane. I will be painting the inside of the entire fuselage with the polycrylic and glass from nose to wing joint.

Is there a guide of the particular weakspots for each warbird?
I just used the standard epoxy from Ace Hardware (not the fast 5min curing). This stuff cures slow, its actually still tacky 3 hours later. So I just used a popsickle stick to smear a nice smooth coat around the entire nose including the plastic chin guard that was previously glued on. I needed 5 grams up front. (next time I'll just use a 20gm motor).

Well that plane is tough!, the warbird fuses all seem to break between the leading edge and the front of the plane. I glued a section of super light barbeque skewer on the inside of each fuse-half here.

That and the magnets for wing made it pretty darn crash proof.
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 03:26 PM
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Hmmm..maybe the 17 gram motor from Lazertoys...not sure if it would fit in the smaller fuselage of the 109 though.
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyMatt View Post
That is the one I think Joe was using let fuss but probably heavier than the balsa but based on the above build it seems like nose weight is a good thing.

What type of expoxies are used to glass the nose? I know some have used just one sheet of fiberglass fabric with water based poly urethane. I will be painting the inside of the entire fuselage with the polycrylic and glass from nose to wing joint.

Is there a guide of the particular weakspots for each warbird?
I don't glass the nose on mine just to save weight. I do put a couple of coats of wbpu on the inside of the whole fuselage though. The motor mount that I linked to is very similar to the one Joe used, I don't think his has the screw and stop plate, they are not needed though and I remove them. I use the 5 minute epoxy to secure the motor mount, no real preference, just what I had on hand.

There was sort of a guide to the strengths and weaknesses of eash of the fuselages, or it may have been just knowledge that was passed on, it can most likely be found somewhere in the 3 discussions on these planes. Although the first two are closed (I do believe.) You might want to ask Joe1320, he is one of those that passed a lot of the expertise on to most of us. (check his blog he has build logs on a few of the planes ... pretty good info there)

I don't think the 16gr HK (17gr Lasertoyz, same same) motor will fit in the 109, Spit or Mustang ... without major surgery! I use one in the Corsair and it took some Dremel work to get it to fit.
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 06:07 PM
Crashing but learning...
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Brazil, São Paulo, Sao Paulo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rotagen View Post
ESC: BPhobbies 10amp, these suck, and they're a overkill but I had one on a shelf that actually worked (surprised me).
.
They worked for me every single time (now I have one Zero and one P-47 flying with these ESCs) and seems now at least one worked for you!
That's good to know since I have 3 more on the shelf.
I will test the others just to be sure they will work too.
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 06:11 PM
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Melbourne
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What are people using for spinners?
The stock spinners are all but impossible to use with brushless motors without major modification - however modifying them and keeping them 100% true is a challenge in itself.
Does anyone know where you can get 1" (25mm), light weight (that's the key) spinners?

Or am I going to have to lathe up my own?
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Old Nov 18, 2010, 06:59 PM
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Thanks Eagle, I got some Bondo fiberglass fabric but I might keep for another build. I got the idea from Joe's build of a 109. I got some cabon rod that I can use to help strengthen the fuselage too.

I will stick with the 10g motor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagle34 View Post
I don't glass the nose on mine just to save weight. I do put a couple of coats of wbpu on the inside of the whole fuselage though. The motor mount that I linked to is very similar to the one Joe used, I don't think his has the screw and stop plate, they are not needed though and I remove them. I use the 5 minute epoxy to secure the motor mount, no real preference, just what I had on hand.

There was sort of a guide to the strengths and weaknesses of eash of the fuselages, or it may have been just knowledge that was passed on, it can most likely be found somewhere in the 3 discussions on these planes. Although the first two are closed (I do believe.) You might want to ask Joe1320, he is one of those that passed a lot of the expertise on to most of us. (check his blog he has build logs on a few of the planes ... pretty good info there)

I don't think the 16gr HK (17gr Lasertoyz, same same) motor will fit in the 109, Spit or Mustang ... without major surgery! I use one in the Corsair and it took some Dremel work to get it to fit.

Slaanesh - I remember seeing where the someone used foam eggs from a craft store, cut them in half and then used those as a spinner. I have some GWS prop adaptor spinners but I am thinking they may be on the small side.
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Old Nov 20, 2010, 02:27 AM
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's-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slaanesh View Post
What are people using for spinners?
The stock spinners are all but impossible to use with brushless motors without major modification - however modifying them and keeping them 100% true is a challenge in itself.
Does anyone know where you can get 1" (25mm), light weight (that's the key) spinners?

Or am I going to have to lathe up my own?
Hi Slaneesh,

I am afraid you will have to make your own. In that light it isn't really that hard to convert the supplied spinners. OK, the Me-109 is difficult because it is glued on, as is the zero spinner. The other ones are quite easy. With the F4U corsair and the P-47 you can use a prop adapter with a nice spmmer like nut. If you have bought a 10g outrunner from HK, it is supplied. On planes like the spitfire, P-40, P-51, FW-190, the spinner has two small screws. carefully remove the screws and take the base plate with prop from the spinner cap. Now with a sharp knife remove the prop and the little plastic prop retainers from the base plate. Do this by gently cut through the plastic an glue going round and round. Also watch your fingers and retain from using to much force. Eventually the plastic and the prop will come loose. You might be able to use that prop in future builds.

One side done, the other side also contains a plastic tube sticking out of the base plate. again remove that carefully with a sharp knife as done at the other side. You will end up with a base plate, two screws and a spinner cap.

Now you need the prop and the prop adapter you plan to use. If both are not to big (and they should not because this is only a small plane). you can use that with your spinner. First you need to know the bore of your prop and thus the size of your prop adapter. Use a drill or a dremel tool to widen the centerhole of your base plate. Do this carefully and make it a thight fit. If done, put your prop adapter through the hole, attach your prop on the other side of the base plate and fasten the nut. If you widened the hole carefully, the baseplate is perfectly centered. Notice that the base plate has a front and a back side. attach properly in order to correctly apply the screws later.

The back of the prop blade should be touching the little rims on the base plate for correct alignment with the spinner cap. The spinner cap has two gaps for the prop. It is very likely they are to small for the prop used. Loosely apply the spinner cap on the baseplate to get an Idea of how much the gaps need to be widened. Also look if the screw holes of the baseplate aling with the little screw tubes in the spinner cap. widen the gaps by constandly checking the fit of the prop in the spinner cap. Small pieces at a time. You should end up with a pretty nice spinner .

One isse might arrive. If your prop has a big center piece, it might not fit between the screw tubes of the spinner cap. In that case make two channels in the side of the plastic of the center piece of your prop to allow for the screw tubes to run alongside the centerpiece of the prop. If this is to much work, buy a different prop .

Lots of text for a simple procedure...

Good luck and let me know if you run into trouble!

Robert
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Old Nov 20, 2010, 04:06 AM
fxb
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Aquitaine France
Joined Mar 2010
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hello all ...

With the spit and the FW 190 I tried to apply the method described by Robert.

See attached photos. Here I use a propeller GWS EP-5030.

Actually Robert I am excited to see how you're going to adapt the nano gear on bug COX. I wonder if it is possible to couple with the landing gear system components. Gear down / flaps down - Gear inside / flaps in ...

We like the challenge ... No??

Good day everyone.
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Old Nov 20, 2010, 06:37 AM
TEAM HILLBILLY
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Pretty good description there Robert. That is how I did the spinner for my Mustang also. The only difference is I'm using a different prop adapter (much smaller) and the back plate goes on between the motor and the base of the adapter. I have to assemble the prop, spinner combination then attach the whole thing to the motor. Works pretty good.
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