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Old Oct 27, 2009, 12:59 PM
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etotheo's Avatar
Saskatoon, SK.
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Help!
ESC, Battery and Motor Connection Type Help

I know there are a lot of connection types out there...

I'm just getting into the e-flight end of things (winter is on it's way) and have zero experience with any of this!

Have said that, I've just ordered a battery, esc and motor (sizes as per recommendations from RCPowers) for a park flyer foamie that I've already build.
-The battery already has a little 4-wired plastic connection (I believe it is for charging) and 2 open ended wires (that go to the esc).
-The motor has 3 open ended wires (that go to the esc).
-The esc has the little plastic receiver connection, 3 open ended wires (that go to the the motor), and finally another 2 open ended wires (that go the the battery).

I do not have a charge yet. I've got 8-12 days for the shipping of the equipment noted above to figure out what charger I'll get (and sort out these wires).

I'm wondering what are the best types of connectors to use and for the open ended wires indicated above (Traxxas, Deans, Bananas, etc.) and if any soldering will have to be done.

Thanks all.
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Old Oct 27, 2009, 02:08 PM
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For the wires that come in groups-of-three (eg. brushless ESC motor outputs, and a brushless motors) it's typical to use so-called "bullet" connectors. More often than not, you get a set of these when you buy a brushless motor. The motor will probably have the males already installed. It will be your job to solder the female bullet connectors to the ESC outputs.

For the wires that come in pairs (eg., batteries and DC input leads for ESCs) the more common connectors are Deans, EC3, etc. Polarity is supremely important here -- connecting a battery to an ESC with the wrong polarity can be injurious to both.

Bullet connectors, Deans, EC3, etc. are all designed to carry hefty DC currents... up to maybe 50 amps or even more.

The thin three-conductor cable coming off the ESC is the so-called BEC output (BEC = battery eliminator circuit.) The plug at the end of that cable plugs into the "Throttle" connection on your receiver. That cable delivers 5V power to the receiver and servos, and it also delivers the throttle control signal from the receiver back to the ESC.

The power involved in this connection is minimal. Most BECs are rated at 1.5 to 2 amps or so, and most parkflyer servos consume around .25 amps.
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Old Oct 27, 2009, 02:19 PM
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Many (myself included) use deans ultras for the battery to ESC connection. Deans has a "T" configuration. The top of the "T" is positive (red). Put the female on the battery.

For the ESC to motor connection use banana connectors. Put the females on the ESC. 3.5mm or 4mm work well.

Be sure to use shrink tubing on all connections.

The three wire connector on the ESC goes to the throttle port on the receiver.

Connect the three ESC to motor wires and advance the throttle to check for motor rotation. If the motor does not spin in the correct direction reverse any two of the ESC to motor wires.

The 4 wire connector on the battery is for balancing. Some chargers charge through the balance connector and some do not but use the battery discharge wires for charging. Some use both. The charger I recommend is the FMA Multi 4.
http://www.fmadirect.com/new_applications/multi4.html
It is a safe reliable charger and in the rare case where support is required it is available in the US.

Glen
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Old Oct 27, 2009, 03:11 PM
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Saskatoon, SK.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rafe_b
For the wires that come in groups-of-three (eg. brushless ESC motor outputs, and a brushless motors) it's typical to use so-called "bullet" connectors. More often than not, you get a set of these when you buy a brushless motor. The motor will probably have the males already installed. It will be your job to solder the female bullet connectors to the ESC outputs.

For the wires that come in pairs (eg., batteries and DC input leads for ESCs) the more common connectors are Deans, EC3, etc. Polarity is supremely important here -- connecting a battery to an ESC with the wrong polarity can be injurious to both.

Bullet connectors, Deans, EC3, etc. are all designed to carry hefty DC currents... up to maybe 50 amps or even more.

The thin three-conductor cable coming off the ESC is the so-called BEC output (BEC = battery eliminator circuit.) The plug at the end of that cable plugs into the "Throttle" connection on your receiver. That cable delivers 5V power to the receiver and servos, and it also delivers the throttle control signal from the receiver back to the ESC.

The power involved in this connection is minimal. Most BECs are rated at 1.5 to 2 amps or so, and most parkflyer servos consume around .25 amps.
Thanks for the response.

Having these forums are such a huge asset.
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Old Oct 27, 2009, 03:17 PM
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Saskatoon, SK.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ggcrandall1
...The charger I recommend is the FMA Multi 4.
http://www.fmadirect.com/new_applications/multi4.html
It is a safe reliable charger and in the rare case where support is required it is available in the US.

Glen
Thanks for the info and the link.

Could this charger also be used for a transmitter?

The only reason I ask, is that I've recently bought Spektrum's DX6i and it comes with this little wall charger that gives no indication as to when the 1500mAh NiMH AA batteries are done charging.
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Old Oct 27, 2009, 03:27 PM
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^^^ I leave my Dx6i plugged in to its little charger whenever it's at home. There is a voltage indicator on the LCD display of the radio. From what I've seen, anything above about 5.1 volts is OK. Fresh off the charger, I usually see around 5.7 volts.
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Old Oct 28, 2009, 12:02 PM
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I agree with the connectors to be used above...

As for the charger, I believe this would be your best choice:
http://shop.singahobby.com/?q=node/13261

This charger is as simple as plugging the battery in and letting it charge. All you do is pick the charge rate ahead of time and it does the rest for you. If you overdischarge the battery in flight, it automatically does a safety charge. It works wonders.

As for your transmitter, the charger it came with should work fine. Look on the part of the charger that plugs into the wall, it should say the rate it charges at (for example "Tx 55 mAh"). That means that for every hour it is plugged in it will supply 55 mA into the battery. So, if your 1500 mAh Tx battery is on LOW BATTERY, keep it plugged in for 25-27 hours and it will be fully charged. (1500mAh / charge rate in mA = X hours on charger)

Good Luck,

~Mark
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Old Oct 29, 2009, 07:47 AM
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Saskatoon, SK.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m61hp09 View Post
I agree with the connectors to be used above...

As for the charger, I believe this would be your best choice:
http://shop.singahobby.com/?q=node/13261

This charger is as simple as plugging the battery in and letting it charge. All you do is pick the charge rate ahead of time and it does the rest for you. If you overdischarge the battery in flight, it automatically does a safety charge. It works wonders.

As for your transmitter, the charger it came with should work fine. Look on the part of the charger that plugs into the wall, it should say the rate it charges at (for example "Tx 55 mAh"). That means that for every hour it is plugged in it will supply 55 mA into the battery. So, if your 1500 mAh Tx battery is on LOW BATTERY, keep it plugged in for 25-27 hours and it will be fully charged. (1500mAh / charge rate in mA = X hours on charger)

Good Luck,

~Mark
Thanks for the input regarding the transmitter charger... will definitely check that out.

As for a charger goes. I'm just getting into e-flight, so I was thinking something very inexpensive (preferably with an A/C input option) for my first charger. Then a year or so down the road, once I've used something and I'm a little better informed on everything, then I'll start to think about dropping a little more money on the charger.

I've found this Sky Charger at HobbyPartz. I'm a Canadian resident, and sometimes we get killed with the brokerage fees that come along with shipping across the boarder (plus duty). Still not sure what I'm going to do.
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