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Old Jun 22, 2009, 10:13 PM
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RussellTate's Avatar
Sydney Australia
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Build Log
1947 Dumas 19' Chris Craft Utility

This is my first shot at building a boat after seeing some of the great builds on this site! I figure slow and steady might be a good way to proceed so I'll get the box open and have a look inside..
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Old Jun 22, 2009, 10:45 PM
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Monterey Bay California
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Let the build begin! Looking forward to seeing your Utility come together, Russell!
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Old Jun 23, 2009, 12:08 AM
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Lake Balboa, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RussellTate
Hit a snag! (Last photo )
Some frames sit inside the Sheer and Chine and some are outside?
What should I follow, I'm thinking if I follow the frames and distort the sheer will that not affect the final shape of the deck mahogany side strips- (ie they won't marry up properly)
Good luck & happy building. Looking good so far.

That's what sandpaper is for...you'll need to fair each step as you proceed.


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Old Jun 23, 2009, 02:04 AM
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Yep, exactly what WB said! Dumas kits take a little bit of fairing here and there, but that is all part of the fun! (Really, it is! )

Looking good so far! And I see yo have the right beverage for the job!
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Old Jun 23, 2009, 06:21 AM
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I wasn't expecting the kit to be perfect, but I wondered if I should sand everything back to the sheer OR sand everything back to the frame.

If I hear you correctly, it's NOT critical just use my judgement and sand it all evenly?
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Old Jun 23, 2009, 03:26 PM
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Recheck the plan and the instructions to be sure you don't have something together wrong. That looks like a lot of "too big" even for a Dumass kit. Don't cut anything till your sure. Do some more work on the rest of the hull and see if other pieces come out that long. Always look ahead at the instructions at least three steps so you can see where your going.
Also fair the frames to the sheer line and to the chine line. Pete
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Old Jun 23, 2009, 06:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norgale
..Always look ahead at the instructions at least three steps so you can see where your going.
Also fair the frames to the sheer line and to the chine line. Pete

Thanks Norgale, Yes those plans are looking pretty thin and floppy now after me reading and re-reading them!

I agree with your comment on fairing to the chine/sheer that seems obvious to me, as it will allow the outer Mahongany side strips to line up properly ....only the plans say "fair the sheer/chine to the frame???

Damned if I do..and damned if I don't!

think i'll go the Norgale way

Talking of looking ahead: Does West system resin have any adverse reaction to wood stain that is anything OTHER than water based stain?
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Old Jun 23, 2009, 11:00 PM
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Cortland OH
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This is from the Epoxyworks (West Systems) site and will save you the time of looking it up:

Using stains with epoxy

Some stains are better suited for use under epoxy than others. We recommend using water-based aniline dye stain if you plan to apply epoxy. WD Lockwood in New York City (212-966-4046) is an excellent source and offers a variety of different wood-colored stains which can be blended together to achieve a specific color. Their stain is sold in powdered form, which must be added to water the day before you plan to use it so all the crystals will dissolve. Aniline dye stains, when dry, allow the epoxy to penetrate through the dye and attach to the wood itself.

Many oil-based stains compromise epoxy adhesion because the pores of the wood are plugged by these stains. If you plan to use oil-based stains, be sure to experiment to verify that adhesion is adequate. This should include varying how long the stain dries before you apply epoxy. (See Joe Parker's article on testing paint adhesion in Epoxyworks 17 to show how to set up test samples.) Some professional boat restorers report good results applying epoxy over certain oil-base stains if the stain is allowed to dry for several days. Scuffing the stain with a soft abrasive pad before applying epoxy will usually improve adhesion. However, the appearance of the stain may be adversely affected.
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 04:41 AM
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The Lockwood stains, in my experience, work fine under various epoxy mixes... with the caveat that I have not used it under West Systems epoxy yet.

Most of you who have seen my posts before know that I am a major fan of, and have had good luck with, the Lockwood dyes under a variety of finishes.
Quote:
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 06:38 PM
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Thanks guys, interesting points you bring up!

Just ordered some Lockwood stain
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 11:02 PM
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Been having a think about customising the boat a little. I wondered what the dials on the dashboard would look like illuminated or at least recessed a little (the flat decal dials seem to let the area down a little?)

I'd be interested to know if anybody thinks it would work, here's what I have:

(A) Dials marked off of the supplied and decal and completely drilled through the dash. (B) An offcut of the windshield material roughed on the reverse side (to difuse the light). (C) some scrap decal material stuck on to the front of the plastic material (D) the plastic rough side facing back, the decals on the front and stuck onto the rear of the Wooden dash. (E) a light source behind shining through all - I thought of running a 9v bulb up to the rear of the dash straight from the battery pack

Note to self: Figure out another way to drill the holes, the gaps between the 3 closest to each other splintered and caved in!
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Old Jun 26, 2009, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RussellTate
Been having a think about customising the boat a little. I wondered what the dials on the dashboard would look like illuminated or at least recessed a little (the flat decal dials seem to let the area down a little?)

I'd be interested to know if anybody thinks it would work...
Yes, it absolutely will work.

I know because I backlit the six dashboard instruments on my Dumas '38 Chris-Craft Triple Cockpit Barrelback using the decals, though my method was a bit different than yours.

First, as you discovered the spacing is a bit close for the mahogany. I spaced my dials a wee bit further apart, drilled the holes a bit smaller than required and then rolled sandpaper into a tube and rotated that within the holes to carefully enlarge them to the correct size without damaging the dash wood.

Next, I used Robbe brass portholes for my bezels. They can be painted chrome silver or, if you're a real stickler, actually plated.

Then I used the plastic porthole inserts, two per instrument; I cut the instrument dial out of the decal and applied it to the front of one insert; I stacked the other insert on top and glued them into the porthole/bezel.

Fourth, I drilled three small 1/16" holes in the bulkhead to which the dash was to be glued, one between the location of each pair of instruments; then inserted mini bulbs (from model railroad supplies) from the rear of the bulkhead through the holes. I used 1/8" square cross-section balsa to fashion a rectangular frame on the bulkhead to act as a spacer between the bulkhead and the dash, and painted the area inside the frame silver to diffuse and reflect the light.

Once the dash was in place, I had backlit instruments and a way to replace burnt-out bulbs. (That was almost 10 years ago, and I have yet to burn one out.) They're not bright enough to be readily visible in operation on the pond, but on display over the firelplace mantle it looks great. I modified the gear lever to act as a switch, and I run all my navigation lighting off of that, so I don't have to fire up all the running electronics to see the effect.

I'm sure there are better ways to do it, but I'm happy with the result. Good luck with yours!
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Old Jun 27, 2009, 02:55 AM
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Sydney Australia
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Hey Rallison,
Thanks for your post that's some great info you've put forward any chance we could see some photo's of your dash
(in daylight and lit up in subdued light! )

I too have been figuring out a switch device using the Dumas supplied lever. I shaved off the bottom corner so when moved it would push a brass plate down to make contact with another plate and make a contact. Not sure how it will hold up over time or if the brass will tarnish and not connect so well, Here's a photo of a mock I made with scrap wood. Any ideas to improve on the design would be greatly received!


Quote:
Originally Posted by rallison
Yes, it absolutely will work.

I backlit the six dashboard instruments on my Dumas '38 Chris-Craft Triple Cockpit Barrelback....

.... I modified the gear lever to act as a switch, and I run all my navigation lighting off of that, so I don't have to fire up all the running electronics to see the effect.
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Old Jun 27, 2009, 02:55 AM
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