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Old Jun 19, 2009, 11:49 AM
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United States, WA, Hoodsport
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
I don't have any digital photos, the airplane was built back in the mid 1980s. I wish I did have a way to show some photos here.
I do too!

Any way of scanning a few?

EJWash
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 11:58 AM
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DGrant,

Quote:
Originally Posted by DGrant
I was initiated into full-scale aerobatics in a Citabria... it's such a wild ride!!! The plane belonged to a friend of mine, and we went up several times over the course of a few years.. there's nothing like a snap-roll/tail-spin in a full scale.. it was intense and sooo fun.. ..
So I built one... still have it... the GreatPlanes .40 size Decathlon... and it flies as crazy as the full scale.. maybe moreso.. I can't tell from the ground, but it sure looks like it does.. and she's a hand full.
We share that experience in common. I checked-out in the 7ECA shortly after getting my private pilot license. I wanted to have fun while building flight time. I even took a formal basic and advanced aerobatic course. I remember the instructor shaking the wing tip up and down during preflight and how the wing just flexed and rumbled away. When the school put a 7KCAB (150 hp, fuel injected, inverted package, constant speed prop) on the line, I claimed it as mine!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DGrant
Keep up the great work.
Thanks for that!

EJWash
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 01:04 PM
Registered User
Kingston, Tn
Joined Apr 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EJWash1
I hear and respect what you're saying. Indeed, different strokes. That's why Baskin-Robbins has 31 flavors...

Many of the modern sport biplanes took leave from the lines of the "classics". Heck, some don't even look right with "flat" engines, and don't get me started on enclosed canopies! Might as well put mag wheels on a Ford model-T...

Funny that you should mention the Liberty Sport. The full-sized one was built in Arizona. It was made up of surplus parts from 17 different aircraft. Even though a hodgepodge of parts, it really has cool classic lines. I picked-up a Sig kit on eBay about a year ago. Not sure if I'll build it or not.


Funny how all of the names you mention here are related.

Champion Aircraft Company bought the Champ series from Aeronca in 1954. Champion introduced the Citabria in 1964. Bellanca bought Champion in 1970.

If you compare the Aeronca 7AC Champ to the Citabria, you can see where the later is a modernized version of the former.

Just like automobile manufacturers, its interesting how many production aircraft companies there used to be here in the USA.

EJWash
I'll say this, if my Cub had a different cowl on it, it could possibly be mistaken for a champ, I'll have to get some pics of it now that it's at my house and post it.....needless to say, it's not done in the normal Cub Yellow
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 10:22 PM
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The leading edge stock was positioned and glued into place with Titebond. A strip of hardwood was positioned before it to help evenly distribute the clamp pressure. I weighted-down each wing panel as I applied the stock to keep things in square.

EJWash
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 10:38 PM
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The iron-on transfer of the laser printer transparency for the aileron bellcrank arc got me thinking. Why not copy the wingtip outlines onto the 3/4” X 1-1/4” X 8-1/2” wingtip block stock? So I did.

It was worth the experiment. As you can see, a good outline was transfered. Since this is not a symmetrical airfoil, a left and right wingtip block must be made. The printing of the outside rib should be made on the outside of the wingtip block, and the leading to trailing edge taper made on top of the block.

The cutting was performed with my scroll saw. First the top view profile (bird’s eye view) was cut. The cut pieces were then CA’d back on to the wingtip stock to provide a flat surface on the scroll saw table. Just a very light smear of CA was applied to the area outside the wing rib profile. This area will be cut away. Next, the ribs outline is cut. It is important to make this cut at least 1/16” outside the outline. Save the cut away pieces of the wingtip stock. It will be positioned back onto the wingtip to provide a flat surface for clamping the wingtip to the end rib.

After the wingtip block is glued in place, it will be sanded down to fair-in with the rest of the wing sheeting and cap strips. Far better to cut larger and sand to fair than to cut thin and declare: “DOH!”

After the wingtip blocks were cut, I dry fitted them in place. Since the top and bottom leading edge sheeting is in place, there was no way to position a clamp onto the leading edge of the wingtip rib. I cut out a piece of scrap pine wood the shape of the wingtip block on the scroll saw. This way I could use a woodworking bar clamp to apply pressure on the forward area of the wingtip block.

EJWash
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Old Jun 20, 2009, 12:09 AM
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The rest of the top center sheeting ironed-on into place.

Bottom center sheeting and cap strips to go. Then its going to be a balsa dust storm of shaping and sanding.

EJWash
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Old Jun 20, 2009, 06:58 AM
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Traverse City, Michigan
Joined Dec 2005
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Hey EJ

The computer problem seems to be remedied. This is my first post, since it started working.

Keep your iron hot, but do you really need it in the Arizona heat ?
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Old Jun 20, 2009, 08:59 AM
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I keep the iron in the fridge until I need it, and then work fast before the iron gets too hot and singes the wood!

The cool part (no, really - cool) is that the first story walls of the house is made of cinder block with foam filling in the cores (cavities). Helps a lot, but the sectional metal garage door does not...

The funny part is that the instructions in the book call to let the glue set, a "minimum of :30 minutes." When I glued the test pieces, the glue was VERY dry after about :20 minutes. I've found that :15 minutes is about right.

EJWash
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Old Jun 20, 2009, 09:08 PM
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Well, the only wood left in the kit box top is the cap strip material, so I started that process (I had separated all of the wood to build the wing into the kit box top).

Each cap strip was cut for it’s specific location. The tape that you see in the pics serve two purposes. First, to located the rib in order to center the cap strip on the rib. Second, to place each rib in it’s specific rib location.

The cap strips were applied with the iron-on method. A dab of thick CA was applied to the leading and trailing edge of each cap strip after ironing and cooling. Another nice thing about ironing on cap strips is that the strips are flat to one another. There is no “rocking” because as you iron, the iron’s surface covers several cap strips therefore one becomes level to the next.

The wing was weighted down to avoid warping during cap strip application.

Happy Father’s Day, and thanks for following along.

EJWash
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Old Jun 21, 2009, 08:20 AM
Larry Jasmann
Severna Park MD
Joined Jul 2008
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Looking good!

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Old Jun 22, 2009, 02:09 AM
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Thanks Larry!

The capstrips are the last strips of wood in the box.

EJWash
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Old Jun 22, 2009, 08:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EJWash1
Thanks Larry!

The capstrips are the last strips of wood in the box.

EJWash
EJ, you been heating your home with Balsa again? Not much for BTUs but it does burn fast, don't it?

I don't recall your having built the fuse or tailfeathers and you say you've used up all the wood in the boix? Were the afore mentioned built in another thread; or, was I asleep when you did this work?
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Old Jun 22, 2009, 02:35 PM
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Mode One,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
EJ, you been heating your home with Balsa again? Not much for BTUs but it does burn fast, don't it?
And pretty expensive too! Right up there with the utility companies...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
I don't recall your having built the fuse or tailfeathers and you say you've used up all the wood in the boix? Were the afore mentioned built in another thread; or, was I asleep when you did this work?
I probably should have explained in post #1 or so how I process the kit before I start a build. I *sorta* mentioned it in post #87.

I lay out all of the parts and check them first against the list of materials (if one is included) or the plans. In this case, being a sig kit, all parts are listed on the build manual. Then I'll lay out the parts by component (wing, tailfeathers, fuselage, hardware, etc.).

I'll then inspect the quality of the wood. It's sometimes a personal preference, and sometimes there is just poor quality wood included. Warps, twists, wood that is either too hard or too soft for what it is intended for. In the case of the Citabria, for example, one rib die cut sheet was pretty soft. When one rib broke when I was sliding it onto the wing spars, I cut out and replaced all of the ribs from that sheet with a harder sheet of wood. I also replaced both lower internal wing spars. One was too soft, the other was cupped and twisted.

When all of the wood is laid out, I put all of the pieces I need to build a particular component in one-half of the kit box. I find that it makes pieces easier to find since there are less of them to sift through. It also makes the build less overwhelming. Instead of constantly staring at a lumber yard in a box that never seems to be getting any smaller, this method gives you a feeling of progress.

The wing of the Citabria was first up to be built, so I placed all of the wood needed in the top-half of the kit box. This is the "box" that I was refering to. The only pieces left in this box are the cap strip, er, strips.

The tailfeathers are up next, and I'll transfer all the wood needed for the Horizontal and vertical stabs, as well as the rudder and elevator over to the top-half of the kit box.

EJWash
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Old Jun 22, 2009, 03:15 PM
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Gotcha! I just build, replace what is needed as I go along. However, on rare occasions I have used some sticks that were meant for other uses, by doing it this way. I more or less look at how complete the airplane is as a way of gaging progress, not how empty the box is. To each his/her own.
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 09:10 PM
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No work for the last three days...

A few hours today installing wing rib cap strips. There are 56 of them total! The bottom of the wing is complete. Hopefully, will have time to get to the top of the wing on Friday.

110 degrees (F) yesterday and today... The 30” fan in the shop is great at blowing 100 degree hot air, so early mornings is the only tolerable work-window for now.

Tom, can I borrow your snow blower? Please???

What I do is place the cap strip against the leading (or trailing) edge on top of the rib and eyeball-mark the length required at the other end using a single-edge razor blade. I then place the cap strip on a small cutting block and slice through the strip with the razor blade. Please post other techniques you may have.

Thanks for following along!

EJWash
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