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Old Jun 17, 2009, 09:58 AM
ARFs Are Me
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EJWash1
Tom,

Turn-about is fair play, and I asked for it...

EJWash
Believe me, you'll get it !!! LOL
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Old Jun 17, 2009, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
Bellcranks for aileron actuation? How old fashion!
Yeah, I know. I wanted to stick to the plans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
The 1/4th scale Champ I built in the mid 1980s had two aileron servos, mounted up close to the center section and push rods running out to bellcranks and the ailerons were actuated the same as your doing. At the time it was rumored that long servo leads would cause interferance and I think the Y-connector had chokes on them to help with this problem, also. If all the connections are tight; but, smooth actuating, this method is certainly viable.
The owner of my LHS when I was a kid was also a radio technician (old-school oscilloscope and all!). I remember asking him (in the mid-1970s) why there wasn't a way to run two servos at the same time, and he gave the same reason you described. He also experimented with what you termed in-line chokes, and got it right for his large-scale Platt T-28.

I guess some still hold on to the old ways. I pulled a few sets of 1/4-scale plans, both kit and scratch-build, because I got curious as far as aileron actuation was concerned.

Of course, the Nosen Citabria is an older kit and uses one servo/bellcranks. The Sig Clipped-Wing J-3 is also one servo/bellcranks, but mentions using one servo per aileron if preferred by the builder. The Balsa USA J-3 uses two servos, but their L-4 plans show one servo/bellcranks.

I guess technology caught up with kits, because I looked at my GP Extra 300S, a .60 sized kit, and it builds using one servo per aileron.

Up next on the building bench is a vintage Sig Skybolt biplane. You can bet that I'm going to modify this ship to one servo per two ailerons.

EJWash
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Old Jun 17, 2009, 01:56 PM
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There’s one trick or tip that I keep forgetting to include in the build, so I’m posting it now while its on my mind.

Have any of you ever noticed what appear to be dents in your sheeting? You rack your mind, but can’t figure out how they got there? The culprit(s) are right in front of you on your workbench. Its the little bits and pieces of wood, glue, etc. that present themselves during the building process. You lay your sheeted component flat on your bench, and a little weight is all it takes to leave an impression of the foreign matter.

Although I try to be diligent in keeping my workbench clean, I noticed that the bottom of the wing had a few dents. The good news is that these are mostly a case of the wood being compressed around the junk on the bench. At this point, many modelers get out the fillers. Which means more sanding, and actually, more wood removal in the process. There’s an old and simple woodworking trick that can decompress the wood: water.

Take a cloth and wet it with water. Not dripping wet. Just a light wringing. Make a point in the cloth and dab the dent. Dab in the water go get the dent wet enough as just not to get the water to run off. Let it dry. Ta-da!

If you have multiple dents, treat only a few at a time and let them dry. You do not want to work in any warps.

EJWash
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Old Jun 17, 2009, 04:07 PM
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Not a Skybolt, please!!
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Old Jun 18, 2009, 12:46 AM
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Worked on the sheeting on the bottom of the wing under the aileron bellcrank bay. The travel of the linkage from the bellcrank to the servo would have required a 5/8” wide rectangular hole in the bottom of the wing. The instruction/build manual options for a more appealing crescent-shaped slot.

The challenge here was plotting out the location of the bellcrank travel arc onto the sheeting. I used a graphics program to draw the arc, and printed it onto laser printer transparency film. I positioned and then ironed the toner of the transparency to the balsa sheeting. Since I have not used this process before, I also ironed the arc to a test sheet of balsa.

After boring 1/4” holes at the ends of the arc on the wing bottom sheeting and the test sheeting balsa, I used a Perma-Grit 4mm rotary rod in my Dremel. Since cutting the arc was going to be free-hand, I wanted a couple of practice runs. After cutting and sanding two practice arcs, I had at it. I used the third outline of the practice piece to remind me of which direction I needed to cut in first, and then cut the actual model sheeting. After the cut, light sanding. I’m good with the results.

The sheeting was taped-off in the areas where they would contact the ribs. Titebond applied to the top of the ribs first. Then Titebond brushed-on to the sheeting and the tape immediately removed.

After the Titebond set, the sheeting was put into position and CA applied to the trailing edge. Next, the sheeting was ironed onto the ribs. Looks like the cut-out for the arcs (left and right wing panels) are in position just fine.

Thanks for following along.

EJWash
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Old Jun 18, 2009, 01:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
Not a Skybolt, please!!


Actually, the Steen Skybolt and I go way back.

I grew up on the west coast (Southern California) at a time when aviation and aerospace were the primary employers. it was also a time when high schools offered adult evening classes in a variety of subjects. I learned that one of the evening metal shop teachers (a Douglas engineer) was building a Stolp Starduster Too, a two-place sport biplane. I became a part-time helper of the project. When I graduated and went off to college, the Starduster was standing on it's main gear, and my signature was on a small part of the both the metal and wood work. It was a few years later that the finished project made it into the air. Sport biplanes have been a soft spot for me since.

I saw my first Skybolt at the Oshkosh fly-in convention in 1983. I liked the lines better than any other. I liked that it was a little bigger, thus more comfortable than the others. This was the airplane that I wanted to build.

Well, life happens, and building a full-sized aircraft is not in the cards for now. But modeling, which I have been involved in for more than forty-plus years now, is as enjoyable now as it was back then.

I was able to put away a Sig Steen Skybolt kit just before I went into hiatus from the hobby in the mid-1980s to raise my family. It sits there in the box, ready to be laid-out on the building bench. When Wendell Hostetler offered one-quarter scale plans fashioned after the Sig kit, I ordered a set and a kit from Precision Cut Kits. That kit also sits in the box, waiting...

So, don't think that this is a "one-up" model Skybolt venture. This is a passion for a design that caught my eye many years ago.

EJWash
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Old Jun 18, 2009, 07:36 AM
Zor
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Comment on post #95.

Very well done by a master cratsman.

Hope to see you build that Skybolt soon.
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Old Jun 18, 2009, 01:36 PM
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Ailerons are finished!

EJWash
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Old Jun 18, 2009, 05:34 PM
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EJ... thats some really nice work.. you got it going on dude.

PS... SkyBolt.... SkyBolt.... SkyBolt... build it...build it... build it..
I like them too... very much so.
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 12:12 AM
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Started sheeting the wing center section with 1/16” balsa. I measured off the underside area of the sheeting that would come in contact with the ribs, spars, etc. and masked-off strips for the glue. I didn’t want to apply a 3/8” stripe of glue for a 3/32” rib, or apply too much glue in other areas that did not contact the sheeting. A bit more time for the prep, but satisfying.

I gotta say, I LOVE the iron-on method of sheeting. The pics of the sheeting in place is before any sanding. The sheeting just lays right down and stays put. Yeah!

EJWash
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 12:28 AM
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DGrant,

Thanks for the kind words. I'm having a lot of fun with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DGrant
PS... SkyBolt.... SkyBolt.... SkyBolt... build it...build it... build it..
I like them too... very much so.
Oh, don't worry, the 'Bolts WILL be built!

It'll be an interesting match, because the Sig is an (approx.) 18% scale of the full-sized plane, and the Hosteler is an enlarged version of the Sig and (approx.) 26% of the full-sized plane.

Full-size Skybolt wingspan (top wing - larger): 24'
Sig: 51", 6.5 lbs.
Hostetler: 76.5", 22-24 lbs.

EJWash
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 07:14 AM
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I actually like the Skybolt about the least of all sport biplanes (this is only a personal choice). Of SIG's offerings of Biplanes, I always thought the Liberty Sport was the prettiest, followed by the Smith Miniplane. The Skybolt seems squashed down to my eye. Don't get me wrong, I love biplanes and a Skybolt model would be built by myself, long before a P-51 Mustang and I like them also. All this demonstrates is differant strokes, for different folks. I do like the Aeronca Champion's family of designs: Aeronca, Champion, Citabria, Decathalon, Balanca, etc.
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 10:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
I actually like the Skybolt about the least of all sport biplanes (this is only a personal choice). Of SIG's offerings of Biplanes, I always thought the Liberty Sport was the prettiest, followed by the Smith Miniplane. The Skybolt seems squashed down to my eye. Don't get me wrong, I love biplanes and a Skybolt model would be built by myself, long before a P-51 Mustang and I like them also.
I hear and respect what you're saying. Indeed, different strokes. That's why Baskin-Robbins has 31 flavors...

Many of the modern sport biplanes took leave from the lines of the "classics". Heck, some don't even look right with "flat" engines, and don't get me started on enclosed canopies! Might as well put mag wheels on a Ford model-T...

Funny that you should mention the Liberty Sport. The full-sized one was built in Arizona. It was made up of surplus parts from 17 different aircraft. Even though a hodgepodge of parts, it really has cool classic lines. I picked-up a Sig kit on eBay about a year ago. Not sure if I'll build it or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode One
I do like the Aeronca Champion's family of designs: Aeronca, Champion, Citabria, Decathalon, Balanca, etc.
Funny how all of the names you mention here are related.

Champion Aircraft Company bought the Champ series from Aeronca in 1954. Champion introduced the Citabria in 1964. Bellanca bought Champion in 1970.

If you compare the Aeronca 7AC Champ to the Citabria, you can see where the later is a modernized version of the former.

Just like automobile manufacturers, its interesting how many production aircraft companies there used to be here in the USA.

EJWash
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 11:12 AM
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It is an interesting point on the aircraft manufacturer's... I wonder how close it really compares. The "homebuilt" style of aircraft has seemed to evolve greatly though over the last 10+yrs though.. Will the "homebuilt" auto do the same I wonder?
Even with that, automobile restoration is big now too.... with small business taking up slack in manufacturing replacement parts/accessories... enough of that though...

The Citabria is one of my favorites too... I was initiated into full-scale aerobatics in a Citabria... it's such a wild ride!!! The plane belonged to a friend of mine, and we went up several times over the course of a few years.. there's nothing like a snap-roll/tail-spin in a full scale.. it was intense and sooo fun.. ..
So I built one... still have it... the GreatPlanes .40 size Decathlon... and it flies as crazy as the full scale.. maybe moreso.. I can't tell from the ground, but it sure looks like it does.. and she's a hand full.

Keep up the great work.
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Old Jun 19, 2009, 11:28 AM
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My Bud Nosen Citabria kit was converted (Kit Bashed) into a Champion 7GCB. It had the rounded vertical stab. of the champ and the cowling and squared rear windows of the Citabria! It was easy to install a full interior with a nice instrument panel in a 1/4th scale airplane. I took this airplane the farthest of all of any of my scale endeavors. I don't have any digital photos, the airplane was built back in the mid 1980s. I wish I did have a way to show some photos here.
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