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Old Aug 15, 2012, 07:25 AM
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vegos's Avatar
Greece, Attica, Athens
Joined Oct 2010
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Anderson M5 Cross - Slow Motion (0 min 12 sec)


Last video as the Anderson is now resting...
I managed to destroy the 3rd spur gear.
I already order the metal one, so I'm waiting and it"s time for a full disassembly and clean/service the bike.
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Old Aug 18, 2012, 01:59 PM
Vzzznnnn...
vegos's Avatar
Greece, Attica, Athens
Joined Oct 2010
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Two videos of the two Anderson M5 Cross (on my vacations).

JUMPS!

A RTR stock (brushed, yellow) and a Brushless one (orange).

Hope you like it

Anderson M5 Cross Jumps and some dirt action :) (5 min 11 sec)


Anderson M5 Cross Jumps Fun :) (8 min 5 sec)
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Old Aug 29, 2012, 07:48 AM
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Greece, Attica, Athens
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And one question.
I was wondering, how and with what do you lubricate the chain and the gears?

I didn't lubricate the gears (just the chain with WD40) but now that I installed a metal spur gear, I put a bit of grease on it.
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Old Aug 30, 2012, 07:00 PM
Bruce
Palmdale, CA
Joined Sep 2005
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I just use a bit of light oil.
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Old Sep 04, 2012, 03:22 AM
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I find 'dry' aerosol teflon bicycle chain lube to work really well, I usually apply after I've cleaned the bike so the lube drys before next use. WD-40 is probably not the best although better than nothing..
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Old Sep 04, 2012, 09:46 AM
MY '75 CZ "FALTA REPLICA" 2010
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Waterford, Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nzdans View Post
I find 'dry' aerosol teflon bicycle chain lube to work really well, I usually apply after I've cleaned the bike so the lube drys before next use. WD-40 is probably not the best although better than nothing..
Back in the early 80"s, Dirt Bike magazine did a chain oil comparison test and concluded the WD40 performed the worst of any lube available of all the oils tested. It does however, disipate moisture very well and will dry out wet ignition systems, incase you run your bike thru water puddles.
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Old Sep 04, 2012, 12:49 PM
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I've read WD40 isn't meant to be used as a lubricant; only for freeing things off that are stuck, and for dispelling moisture. I guess using that before oiling makes sense though.

How about silicone lubricant, in a spray can? Wet oils probably just help it collect gunge.
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Old Sep 04, 2012, 06:42 PM
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I've read so much over the years about chain lubricants, some say do this, others say use that. The only consistency has been that WD-40 was a water repellent and not a lubricant.

I have used 'dry' and 'wet ' lubricants both on my 1:1 trail bikes and when I raced mountain bikes in the mid 1990's, the Shimano HG chains used to ''stretch'' after one month of bedding in and a race after no matter what I did.

Clean the chain in solvent then lubricate with wet lubricant, clean the chain in solvent then dry lubricant, don't clean the chain, don't clean the chain and use WD-40... ( though I only use WD-40 when I need to unstick a link, otherwise I let it run dry, apart from the trail bikes, where I use old engine oil, but that is personal preference).

Dry lubricant I found attracted particles to stick to the chain inducing wear, wet lubricant flung itself everywhere and held on to particles etc...

I resigned myself to the fact that the only chain that was good was a new one. With new sprockets of course...

In summary, just find what works for you. The only 'fact' that I ever worked out was that chains do not stretch, they wear, and the only way of working out what was worn out was by measuring the deflection across the length of the chain.

The summary of the summary, chains wear out, no matter what you do. Though avoiding dirt (!) helps.
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Old Sep 04, 2012, 07:44 PM
Registered User
United Kingdom, England, Ware
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My two pence here for what it is worth
WD40 has many uses from dispelling moisture to removing the gum left behind after removing decals or sticky lables. Base is claimed to be a fish oil .
Cannot comment on cycle chains but the vast majority of full size motorcycle chains use a pair of small rubber 'O; rings between the side plates and the actual link .
In manufacture the pin is lubricated and the 'O' rings are there to try to retain the lubricant and not to allow grit to get into the pin area
The main function of chain lubricant is to ensure the 'O' rings do not go dry ,harden and eventually fall to pieces where grit then gets into the pin and link causing wear
Lashings of chain grease will just retain grit and make a nice grinding paste
There are a range of automatic oiling systems which apply a very small amount of an 'O'friendly lubricant onto the moving chain keeping the 'O' rings soft and in the case of chain driven big touring/sports bikes extend the life span considerably
It is really what floats your boat but the M5 uses a simple chain so perhaps trying to remove any dirt with a tooth brush followed by a thin coating of a light oil to stop any rusting is the best route to go rather than lashings of oil/grease .
It is also good practise to change both sprockets along with a new chain as worn sprocket teeth will very soon distroy the new chain .
What happens is the pitch of the sprocket teeth changes slightly and the new chain with the original pitch is forced into the worn sprocket .
You can feel the mismatch where the chain appears to bind in certain places and free running in others .
All this takes energy which would be better used in the tyre to ground contact area exactly as per what happens running a chain too tight
A light smear of a thin grease on the pinion /spur gear will not go amiss in reducing friction .
The original plastic gear was semi self lubricating but changing the the metal geat results in a metal to metal contact area which is bad news
Cheers Jim
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Old Sep 12, 2012, 09:38 AM
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Melbourne-Australia
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OK I'll add a little more from my experience... I worked as a bicycle mechanic for over 10 years and always found the teams in shops were preaching to customers "WD-40 is not a lube, it's a water dispersant". WD-40 does not contain fish oil, that one's an urban myth.

Yup wet lubes attract / retain dirt although can be useful in extremely wet / muddy conditions. 1:1 motorbike lubes are usually sticky as so as not to fly off although there certainly are many different choices / methods including boiling your chains in oil etc..

Yep,, I have come across some sticky dry lubes however the ones I've used (by choice) are very dry with nearly no residue and result in a clean, long lasting chain. I've always bought spare chains/sprockets for my R/C bikes yet never had to fit them; my chains / sprockets usually look very clean. The only down side I've found with dry lubes is having to apply them more often and preferably allowing the solvent to dry off before use hence lubing after cleaning the bike..

I'm currently using Weldtite TF2 and have also had very good results with Pedro's Extra Dry (bicycle chain lubes).
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Old Sep 15, 2012, 05:07 PM
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I have wondered as to why the front hubs on the M5 appeared to have provision for a disc brake but could never find a front brake hop up.
Anyone who rides full size bikes will agree that they tend to use the front brake in a higher % to the rear as it settles the suspension and excessive rear brake can cause the rear to lock up.
I had a spare front brake set up from a Venom 450 so with a bit of aluminium bar I grafted it onto the M5
The kit comes with a steel disc that with a little bit of modification replaces the original plastic one and the existing 3mm screws can be used .
The only difference to the Venom set up is they use a floating disc but without considerable machining is not practical on the M5.
I made the actual brake calliper floating by slotting the fixing bolts and not locking the bolts up tight .
Mounted a micro servo onto the frame near the steering servo and job done .
Have changed to a brushless system so used a Y lead and played around with the rear brake force via the ESC .
Didn’t really work out so fitted a Venom Rx and by using the mixing facility on the 3rd channel facility on the Tx got it working well.
As the M5 is considerably lighter than a Venom it is easy to lock up the front wheel and do ‘stoppies’ but you can dial that out via the mixing facility in the Tx
Cheers Jim
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Old Sep 15, 2012, 05:13 PM
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Greece, Attica, Athens
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Brakes? Who need brakes?





By the way, excellent idea and very good work!
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Old Sep 15, 2012, 05:35 PM
MY '75 CZ "FALTA REPLICA" 2010
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Waterford, Michigan
Joined May 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimob23 View Post
I have wondered as to why the front hubs on the M5 appeared to have provision for a disc brake but could never find a front brake hop up.
Anyone who rides full size bikes will agree that they tend to use the front brake in a higher % to the rear as it settles the suspension and excessive rear brake can cause the rear to lock up.
I had a spare front brake set up from a Venom 450 so with a bit of aluminium bar I grafted it onto the M5
The kit comes with a steel disc that with a little bit of modification replaces the original plastic one and the existing 3mm screws can be used .
The only difference to the Venom set up is they use a floating disc but without considerable machining is not practical on the M5.
I made the actual brake calliper floating by slotting the fixing bolts and not locking the bolts up tight .
Mounted a micro servo onto the frame near the steering servo and job done .
Have changed to a brushless system so used a Y lead and played around with the rear brake force via the ESC .
Didn’t really work out so fitted a Venom Rx and by using the mixing facility on the 3rd channel facility on the Tx got it working well.
As the M5 is considerably lighter than a Venom it is easy to lock up the front wheel and do ‘stoppies’ but you can dial that out via the mixing facility in the Tx
Cheers Jim
Jimo, I see you've followed the "Euro" way of thinking on the size of the brake rotor (aka KTM, Husaberg, ect). No cheap stinking 1/5th scale brakes on my MX Monster!!! BRAVO!! Go BIG or stay home!!
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 02:51 PM
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United Kingdom, England, Ware
Joined Aug 2012
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Someone may be able to shine some light here !!!!!!!!!!!
The two nylon bearing holders that hold the end bearings for the axle common to the spur gear and small chain sprocket have been made with an oval section to locate specific into the motor mount .
One could say this was done to ensure that the housings did not turn but is there any reason why they went to the effort of offsetting the oval .
They are specific in their assembly instructions as to which way they should placed
As the two chain sprockets are on the same axis i cannot see changing them around would make a real differance to the suspension as in the case of the Venom where the two sprockets move around differing axis .
Any ideas ?
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Old Sep 23, 2012, 05:03 PM
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vegos's Avatar
Greece, Attica, Athens
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimob23 View Post
As the two chain sprockets are on the same axis i cannot see changing them around would make a real differance to the suspension as in the case of the Venom where the two sprockets move around differing axis .
Any ideas ?
You will lower (or higher) a little bit the rear arm by a few mm. BUT a few mm in 1/5 scale is not so little.

When your axle is at the lowered position, the suspension is a bit compressed, so there is less "distance" for compression. It's more compressed in that position. Also the distance of the battery tray to the ground is smaller (the rear arm is working as a lever).

When your axle is higher, the distance from ground is bigger.

So, with that setting you can change the distance to ground and you can lower or higher the centroid.

Is only by some mm, but 5mm in 1/5 is 25mm in 1:1

Personally, I have tried both positions and haven't found what is better for my driving skills (yet)
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