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Old May 14, 2009, 01:19 AM
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Joined Apr 2009
42 Posts
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What kind of controller do you use? What should I use?

Hi all, I mainly wanted to ask about what kind of controller I should get. I would also like to see what others are using, so if you don't mind, share your stats and take a pic of yours, thanks!

On to the fun stuff...
Here is what I'm looking for:

- A Futaba (since I think they are the best 'practical' brand?)
- One that can control 2 planes and a helicopter (I own an HZ Firebird Phantom, the HZ Supercub, and the mCX Blade heli... is it even possible to have one transmitter control more than one plane?)
- Looking for something around 60-70, but willing to spend more.

Also, once I get this new transmitter, how do I make it control my planes? (I know, noob terminology coming out of a noob, so if you don't mind talk like a child to me because I'm totally new to this stuff)

One last thing, the main reasons I am getting this is because I would rather not own 3-4 transmitters and I also dislike my transmitters throttle button, I would like to get a throttle stick that stays in place once pushed up, like the ones that come on a RealFlight Interlink controller.
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Old May 14, 2009, 01:54 AM
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qman's Avatar
Wanaka, NZ
Joined Mar 2009
601 Posts
i just got a spektrum Dx6i which can control up to 10 different models in memory.
so fair it is great apart from the fact i got a faulty one at first and had to send it back for repair.

easy to program though.
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Old May 14, 2009, 02:29 AM
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madmike8's Avatar
USA, TN, Fayetteville
Joined Dec 2004
878 Posts
I use a Turborix 6ch 2.4ghz - Works, and cheap.
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Old May 14, 2009, 02:40 AM
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crash331's Avatar
Calhoun, GA
Joined Dec 2006
731 Posts
First, you need to decide on a format. The mCX uses DSM2, Spektrum's technology. I think the HZ items use FM. I don't know if it's even possible to convert the HZ items to DSM2, and if you did it would be cost prohibitive.

Second, you aren't going to find anything in that price range that has model memory.


I would just stick with the transmitters you have and live with switching out until you
can save up for for a DX6i or a DX7. That is, if you are going the DSM2 route. If you are going the FM route, I am clueless.
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Old May 14, 2009, 08:04 AM
Watch out for that TREE!
Houston, Tx
Joined Oct 2006
1,458 Posts
I own a hitec laser 4, a hitec optic 6, and a spektrum dx7. The laser 4 is a 72 MHz, 4 channel, non-computer radio. Meaning it has no memory, you can't "save" different setups for different planes. Doesn't mean it won't control more than one aircraft, you just have to set each one up, each time you change planes.
The optic 6 is a 6 channel, 72 MHz computer radio. It will save several different plane setups, so you choose the right setup for the plane you are flying, and you are ready to fly. Set up has been previously done and saved.

The spektrum dx7 is a 2.4 GHz, 7 channel computer radio. It also has momery locations for different plane setups. There is no frequency, per say, on the 2.4 GHz band, so you don't have to worry about someone else on your channel.

Each radio listed is a bit more expensive than the previous listed one, with correspondingly more features. You need matching Rx's for each radio. The hitec's can use the same Rx's, though on different channels. 2.4 GHz Rx's are generally brand specific, you can't use brand A Tx with brand B RX.

I still use all 3 of my radios, each for different applications. The 4 channel for my slow stick, the 6 channel for my older planes, the 2.4 GHz for my newer, dearer planes. They all work equally well. I prefer the spektrum for the peace of mind of 2.4 GHz technology. I have been shot down once, and found that a modeler routinely works on his planes, in his garage that is adjacent to the field I fly in. He is on my channel, so I have to be very careful with my 72 MHz radios.

John
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Old May 14, 2009, 12:08 PM
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Dwhart24's Avatar
Oviedo, FL.
Joined Feb 2009
2,012 Posts
I would just keep the transmitters (controllers) you have and use them. It's a pain to bring them with you, but to do what you want, you would have to change the electronics (rx and/or esc) on the aircraft you have now. Which would cost you more money. If you 're going to stay in the hobby, make your next purchase something you can add your own RX (receiver) and get a Spektrum dx6i or dx7. The dx6i comes with a RX for $200.

David
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Old May 14, 2009, 12:52 PM
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elfwreck's Avatar
United States, CA, Oakland
Joined Dec 2002
2,333 Posts
Hey now,
Here's the thing. You have to realise that the transmitter is the most important piece of kit you'll buy as a modeler.

You'll keep it longer than most any plane, motor, battery, charger, or any other thing you buy. Also everything else depends on it working and working well.
That said, save your bread and buy the best unit you can find/afford.
These days I use a Multiplex Royal Evo 12. Thirty six model memory that I can upload and save in my computor, simple down loads of updated firmware as it becomes available, modul;ar construction so as old parts become obsolete I can just replace them instead of buying a new radio.

Insane mixing capability. I can place any function or combination of functions on and stick, switch, slider, or whatever as I so choose. Not only that bhut incredible service too. On the down side they ain't cheap at five and change to nine hundred depending on where you get it.

Worth it?
You betcha!

Always buy the best you can find with the most options available. You won't regret it. Not only that but if you buy good stuff it tends to hold its value so if you quit and sell your stuff off you can get more of your investment back.

Buy cheap, but twice. Buy good and take care of it and you have a friend for life.

RobII
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Old May 14, 2009, 02:57 PM
Registered User
Letchworth, Great Britain (UK)
Joined Jul 2004
11,523 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Solaris1985
... Here is what I'm looking for:

- A Futaba (since I think they are the best 'practical' brand?)
- One that can control 2 planes and a helicopter (I own an HZ Firebird Phantom, the HZ Supercub, and the mCX Blade heli... is it even possible to have one transmitter control more than one plane?)
- Looking for something around 60-70, but willing to spend more.

Also, once I get this new transmitter, how do I make it control my planes? (I know, noob terminology coming out of a noob, so if you don't mind talk like a child to me because I'm totally new to this stuff)

One last thing, the main reasons I am getting this is because I would rather not own 3-4 transmitters and I also dislike my transmitters throttle button, I would like to get a throttle stick that stays in place once pushed up, like the ones that come on a RealFlight Interlink controller.
One transmitter can control as many planes as you like, provided you have compatible receivers in the models If you buy a decent transmitter it will have servo reversing switches, which means you can configure it to suit whichever model you're using simply by flipping a few switches. Mainstream transmitters will also have a proper throttle/rudder stick, instead of the throttle button that you've got now.

Nowadays you have a choice between 72MHz (in the USA) systems and 2.4GHz ones. 2.4GHz has the advantage that you can't get interference from other flyers, and lots of people are changing over to it. That means you can pick up 72MHz systems cheap these days, and technically there's nothing wrong with them provided you observe good frequency control -- i.e. make sure that nobody else flying near you is using the same channel as you, or vice versa.
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Old May 14, 2009, 04:32 PM
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Everett Wa.
Joined Jun 2001
5,925 Posts
I have to second RobII. Buy more than you can afford, you will grow into it! The radio scene has (is) going through a large shift from 72Mhz to 2.4 Ghz. So you need to think about where this is going. For example 2.4 Ghz uses manufacture specific proprietary coding. Are you willing to be tied down to what one manufacture offers.

Today I don't think the use of a non-computer controlled radio is a viable option. With that statement in mind you need to examine what software logic is offered in the TX. I have to say I never really could program a radio that is based on the slave master concept of mixing. (This is what most radios use). I really like the what Multiplex uses as a programing concept. That is that just about any number of control input can can control just about any number of outputs. There is no master slave constraint.

I'm using a Multiplex Royal Evo 12 and Multiplex Profi 4000 on 72mhz. I also use a Multiplex Profi 4000 with Spektrum 2.4 Ghz module. There really is no substitute for the programing freedom of the Profi, but the Royal comes close. I do wish I had model match for my Multiplexes on 2.4 Ghz and that my Profi had a more modern graphical display.

I have a Spektrum DX7 that I don't use other than for my PZ Vapor because I can't get past the programing logic.

Do take the time to ask the flier at the field about the programing limitation of their radio. See if they will show you how hard or easy it is to navigate through the menus.

I can't stress enough the need to understand the programing logic on these higher end radios.

I know this is outside of your $80 dollar limit, but it is something to think about.

All the best,
Konrad
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Old May 26, 2009, 09:35 PM
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Joined Apr 2009
42 Posts
I'm still a little confused with all of this, I don't even really know how to state questions on what I'm confused on because it's all kind of jibberish to me...
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Old May 27, 2009, 02:25 AM
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Letchworth, Great Britain (UK)
Joined Jul 2004
11,523 Posts
OK, where are you located? The easiest way to get your head around how radio control works is to go visit a local club and see what they do.

Or, why don't you tell us which bits are jibberish, and we'll try and explain them better
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