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Old Dec 02, 2010, 09:44 PM
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tinknocker's Avatar
New Jersey
Joined Jan 2008
301 Posts
Dick Nice work on the instrument panel. Really looks great. I scratch built my steering wheel hooked it up to turn with the rudders. It is a little thicker than it should be but having to carve everything by hand the spindles should have been thinner but I kept breaking them when they got too thin. Cruising 10 yards off shore at 10 knots it won't be an issue. Your fittings look good. So far I have not had success with mine. I need to spend more time sanding and polishing them. The pot metal takes a lot of work to bring them up to shine.
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Old Jan 02, 2011, 09:49 AM
Chris Craft Corvette
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United States, SC, Charleston
Joined Mar 2006
209 Posts
I tried to replace as many of the Sterling pieces as possible with better pieces.
Here are some pictures of the substitutions. I will post how I made each one.
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Old Jan 02, 2011, 12:03 PM
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Joined Dec 2004
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As many of you who have been reading the threads about the Sterling 42’ Chris Craft Corvette will surmise, there is a lot of confusion about the number of boats Chris Craft really made with this design and why did Sterling Models choose to make it. I will try to answer the question to the best of my knowledge since my company was working closely with Sterling Models for the better part of 15 years, up until the company was sold to ESTES Rocket Co.

First the part that confuses a lot of people is that The Chris Craft 42’ Corvette was not one of the stock cruiser that Chris Craft produced and in fact , a single (one off) was built using a 42’ EXPRESS hull in 1955. Other than that one hull, all other hulls with the Corvette name were 36’ in length of which 33 hulls were built with the same cabin arrangement, and were all built in the 1954 year.

In 1955, besides the one 42‘ hull, 10 hulls of the 37‘ Commander hull were built with the same layout as the 36‘ Corvette, and as such carried the Corvette name plate. To further add to the confusion the 1949-50 41’ Double Cabin Enclosed Bridge/Fly Bridge Cruiser at first glance looks exactly like the 42’ Corvette with the exception being that it has a sliding door entry on the side of the main cabin, where as the 42 corvette had a swinging side entry to the fly bridge. I am adding a picture of the 41’ Double Cabin Enclosed Bridge/ Fly Bridge for comparison.
http://www.portcarlingboats.com/cmatheson/DSCF0055.JPG

Now as to the reason that Sterling Models Choose to model this model as I was told was, that back in the 1950’s, Sterling Models had in writing from Chris Craft Corp., a letter stating that they could use the Chris Craft name, in perpetuity for the different models of Chris Crafts they manufactured. At that time Sterling Models was one of the biggest model manufacturers of wooden model boats and planes of not only the country, but the world. They had an unequalled ability to obtain the plans of every boat manufactured buy Chris Craft, even of boats that were still in the preproduction stages. The 42’ Chris Craft Corvette was just such a project, and being the newest of the designs, Sterling Models choose the model it. What happed after was is that both the real boat and the model became one of the rarest of the model Christ Crafts, and with the passing of Sterling Models, one of the most sought after.

By the way, if any of you collector types of the old modeling magazines are out their, Go back in the issues to the 1950’s and look at the range of Chris Craft models Sterling Models Produced. There were upwards of twenty different models over the years. Add to that , they also produced a line of CENTURY model boats, as well as military, and other pleasure boats, now long gone in both model form and full size.

Oh yes!!! By the by, Sterling Models also produced one of the biggest line of “control line” models as well as rubber band free flight, and were one of the first to start producing kits for this new segment of the hobby called “RADIO CONTROLLED”

Hope this sheds some light on nagging questions about Sterling Models, one of the premier companies of the times.
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Old Jan 02, 2011, 12:28 PM
Chris Craft Corvette
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United States, SC, Charleston
Joined Mar 2006
209 Posts
THANKS RICH, In the 7th grade I built a 21" Sterling Chris Craft Monterey and always wanted the bigger boat.
Dick
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Old Jan 16, 2011, 09:06 AM
Chris Craft Corvette
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United States, SC, Charleston
Joined Mar 2006
209 Posts
The exhaust surrounds are from Mack Marine. They are aluminum. With just a little bit more polishing, they look like chrome. The exhaust pipe itself is a piece of brass tubing that just fits inside the Mack aluminum surround. I used the Caswell plating system to copper plate the brass tubing. I think these old boats had all copper exhaust systems. My 64 Century Resorter did. I then cut the copper plated pipe to a length just longer than the height of the Mack surround.
I put down wax paper and then put a drop of epoxy glue on it and put the Mack surround on top of the epoxy making sure none got on the outside. I then put the copper plated piece centered into the surround. It is now setting on the wax paper with the surround and it extends slightly above the surround. The epoxy is below the top edge of the surround. When the epoxy cures I use a Dremel tool to slightly hollow out the back side and rough it up and do the same to the mounting location on the boat. Both exhausts are them epoxied to the boat. The lower piece in the picture shows the back side after using the Dremel tool. The inside of the exhaust pipes were painted flat black.
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Old Jan 30, 2011, 12:56 PM
Chris Craft Corvette
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United States, SC, Charleston
Joined Mar 2006
209 Posts
This is the rear flagstaff. I thought the one supplied in the kit, aside from being bery rough was out of scale and way too big. I've always liked the wood flagstaffs tapered on both ends with the little round knob on top, so I make my own. I selected a dowel and put it in a drill. I then selected a piece of piano wire and picked a drill bit the same size. With the dowel in one drill and the drill in the other chucked up and turned on, I drilled out the dowel rod and glued in the piece of piano wire. Poor man's lathe. I then chucked up the piano wire with the dowel epoxied on and turned it to the shape I wanted. I then stained and varnished the mast. The Mack base I sanded at an angle so the flagstaff angle would be the same angle as the transom. The transom had been filled earlier with micro balloons and epoxy so I had a solid mounting place. I drilled the hole for the piano wire. Now I can take out this flagstaff during transport.
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Old Feb 03, 2011, 08:22 AM
Bob
Metairie, La. USA
Joined May 2010
120 Posts
The base for the rear flagstaff can also be made from a washer and brass tubing soldered and sprayed w/Duplicolor. The exhaust I use brass washers drilled and brass tubing.
Bob
www.ChrisCraftModels.com
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Old Feb 03, 2011, 05:39 PM
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Southern Calif
Joined Dec 2005
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Very nice details.

Ed
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 09:16 AM
Chris Craft Corvette
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United States, SC, Charleston
Joined Mar 2006
209 Posts
The mast supplied in the kit is cast pot metal. Rough and fragile. I decided that I wanted wood and I wanted the light on top to be functional. I bought a dowel rod bigger than the largest dimension of the mast and cajoled a friend with a lathe to help me. The hard part was drilling a hole through the middle that was straight. We chucked the dowel in the jaws of the lathe and put a drill bit in the other chuck. we drilled as far as we could and then flipped the dowel around and center punched that end also and drilled until we broke through to the other drilled hole. The drill bit tends to wander and with the hole for wires not much smaller than the smallest part of the mast, there's not much room for error, so we made three of these. I then band sawed the dowel to the thickness using marks on the end, being careful to center the drilled hole. With the thickness finished, I laid it flat on the bandsaw table and cut out the profile, again paying attention to the holes.
All that was left to do at this point was to shape it to the airfoil shape. I used a belt sander for this and simply held it with my hand. Again, pencil marks on the ends helped guide the progress.
When profiling the mast, I found that the drilled holes on 2 of them came through on the sanding process. Thankfully the third worked out OK.
I then stained and varnished the mast.
The light was a standard mast light that I took the mast off of and just used the light itself. The wires had to be extended. With the small hole the wires are a tight fit. I cut the wires that came with it to different lengths so the shrink tubing would be in a different location on each wire. I counldn't have gotten the two wires through otherwise.
There are two different sizes of brass tubes and each has a corresponding tube that it fits in snugly. The two upper tubes had the wires pulled through them and were then epoxied into the mast, making sure they didn't touch and short out. The wires were then soldered to the tube that they were pulled through. The two lower tubes had wires soldered to then and were slid over the connectors epoxied into the mast. They were then epoxied into the cabin roof, paying attention the angle (match the rake of the windshield) and making it plum. The mast can be removed and the electrical pins act as a plug. I made them slightly non parallel so it would be a tight fit.
The second picture shows how I made the reflector that sits just under the light. I used aluminum flashing (I had it ) and polished it, drilled it and then cut it to shape and bent it to match the piece supplied in the kit. It was mounted and epoxied under the light.
I then sanded and polished the base of the casting supplied in the kit. I hollowed it out and them cut it off. I used the Caswell Plating kit to chrome it and then epoxied it to the bottom of the mast.
The flagstaff on the bow light I made out of maple, finished it and epoxied it to the bow light, It only took two weeks for me to snap it off. I drilled it and epoxied in a piece of piano wire, so it is also removable.
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Old Mar 05, 2011, 10:18 PM
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New Jersey
Joined Jan 2008
301 Posts
Corvette I did the same with the mast on mine but I took a slightly different way. I made mine in two halfs from 1/8" mahagony. Cut the profile and the angle on the bottom then with a micro gouge routed out the center on both halves for the wires to run through. Put the wires in then glued the halves together. When dry sand to the airfoil shape. Once it was sanded the seams front and rear disappeared. I never did have any luck drilling along the grain. The drill always seemed to run off. The base is another story. I have tried to plate different original fittings with the Caswell system and the results have been the same. The copper plating turns black so I carved a master out of basswood made a mold and poured one using the alloy from Micro Mark. That alloy takes plating very well and polishes up very nice. If you can offer any advice it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Doug
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Old Mar 06, 2011, 05:31 PM
Chris Craft Corvette
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United States, SC, Charleston
Joined Mar 2006
209 Posts
Hi Doug,
If I remember correctly the black is maybe a burn? It will polish off. My plating is not great, but from a galloping horse it looks great. I still have some pits and buff and sanding marks, but from a distance you mainly see that distinctive chrome color and shine. I think if you try submerging the part in the solution as someone had suggested it might work better. I'm going to try that when I get back to it. Buff off the black with a small pad on the Dremel tool using one of their compounds and replate with the copper. Be careful not to go through the copper as the lead is much softer and you'll make a hollow spot as I did a few times. I'm not sure this is your cure, but you might try it. Maybe someone else will chip in with some more tips.
If I had thought of your way of making the mast I would have done it instead of my way.
Dick
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Old Mar 06, 2011, 09:20 PM
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tinknocker's Avatar
New Jersey
Joined Jan 2008
301 Posts
Dick I will post some pics of the mast. My thought is ten feet off shore at ten knots no one will see the flaws, right. we build for our own pleasure. I wish that I could build museum quaility but I can't so I do the best I can.Thanks for the suggestion on the plating I will try again.

Doug
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Old Mar 16, 2011, 10:24 AM
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Joined Aug 2007
139 Posts
try making some trim tabs to set her nose down a bit. that way you are not changing your internals around and since most cabin cruisers tend to squat when coming up on plane the trim tab was developed to tend to the issue. I think she looks great running
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Old Mar 16, 2011, 06:22 PM
Chris Craft Corvette
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United States, SC, Charleston
Joined Mar 2006
209 Posts
HI PTJIM,
That may be the solution I use. The boat now sits perfectly on the boot stripe, so if I move the internals around that would change. I bought two 17 turn armatures from ED Hughey and will replace my two 24 turn armatures. I'm told this is more horsepower. I also bought from Ed different gear ratios. I now have 2 1/2 to 1 and I bought a 2 to 1 set and a 1 1/2 to 1 set. These will spin the props faster. So, I'll try these things first and then some form of trim tabs.
Thank you for your input.
Dick
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Old Mar 17, 2011, 08:09 AM
GILL
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United States, NJ, Hopatcong
Joined Aug 2005
2,568 Posts
It sounds like you are using 540 size motors, way to small for this boat. I always suggest a minimum of 800's The 2 I am finishing right now have 900's

Sorry to say that those 17's will not give more horse power, just more speed, but at a lower horse power. You will need a very high gear reduction to make them work.
The less number of winds the higher the speed and the lower the HP.
More turns the higher the HP and the lower the speed.
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