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Old Nov 05, 2011, 08:17 PM
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4 stroke motor

hi guys. i have a 1.20 4 stroke motor, i need to know what the screw is for on the side of the carb.also,how many turns to set the carb.air/fuel mixture. in other words how do tune the motor.i don't want to damage the motor. any help?
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Old Nov 05, 2011, 10:04 PM
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You really need to tell us what brand engine you have. Model # also is helpful to determine vintage.
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 01:35 AM
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Motors run on electricity. The needle valve is set where the engine runs correctly. It's trial and error. Start about 3 turns out. That is if it's the needle valve you're talking about.
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 01:16 AM
Complete RC Idiot Savant
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datsunguy View Post
Motors run on electricity.
Oh.... well.... in a large part of the world they can run on fuel too, and in some parts of the world, it needs to be a motor to consume fuel, otherwise it runs on steam.... Not really interesting to make such a distinction

Brgds, Bert
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 01:49 AM
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Technically, the correct term to use would be Internal Combustion Engine. motors use an external source for power. The exception would be the steam engine which gets its "power" externally, but uses it internally to push on a piston or pistons.
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 08:10 AM
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Well a picture would help too. Most four strokes have twin needle carbs, that is adjustments on both sides of the carb. It is true that one side could be well hiddened down in the throttle arm. But the big needle is pretty obvious usually having a knurled knob and retainer spring (or clicker) to keep it in place. That is usually the high speed Needle (HSN)valve and is usually set from one and half turns to two turns out. Often people start their four cycle engines with the HSN at three turns out and adjust inward. Three turns out is rich.

The Low Speed Needle valve, and sometimes it is not a needle in the sense that the HSN is trully a needle tipped device, but suffice to say is an adjustment, is a very important adjustment. At the top of this thread there is a tutorial on how to set the carb. I suggest you read up on it, then ask questions.

Good luck,

Chip
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Last edited by Chip01; Nov 06, 2011 at 08:12 AM. Reason: typos
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 11:46 AM
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make it easy on me, ill sell the motor and use a o.s 91. easy to tune.problem solved.
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 03:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brutus1967 View Post
Oh.... well.... in a large part of the world they can run on fuel too, and in some parts of the world, it needs to be a motor to consume fuel, otherwise it runs on steam.... Not really interesting to make such a distinction

Brgds, Bert
Engineering definition: Motors run on electricity. Everything else is an engine. They are steam ENGINES not steam motors. Internal combustion engines not motors, rocket engines not motors, jet engines not motors,etc.

Just because loads of people use the wrong term doesn't make it correct.
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 05:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datsunguy View Post
....... They are steam ENGINES not steam motors......
I can back this one up!!!! I run them, licensed and all that and get paid besides
License says qualified to be engineer in charge on watch for any engine (unlimited horsepower)
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Old Nov 06, 2011, 11:06 PM
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Here we go again,

Then why is it called Ford Motor Company, General Motors, Chrysler Motor Company, etc.

You nit pickers are full of crap, get a life!

Been building and rebuilding two and four stroke engines for aircraft, autos, trucks, motorcycles, marine,
and diesel most of my life.
Most didn't care what they are called except the nit picking twits.

Good day sirs!




A man that hates kids and dogs can’t be all bad. But then, I’ve met some dogs that I liked.
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Old Nov 07, 2011, 04:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datsunguy View Post
Engineering definition: Motors run on electricity. Everything else is an engine. They are steam ENGINES not steam motors. Internal combustion engines not motors, rocket engines not motors, jet engines not motors,etc.

Just because loads of people use the wrong term doesn't make it correct.
Datsunguy,

Let’s talk about airplane modeling, and for that I think the FAI is leading in these.
I was FAI pilot in the past so familiar with the rules.
Not trying to give a complete explanation I limit my input with the description of one of the classes, F1B rubber power.

F1B rubber power - projected surface area 17-19 dm2, minimum weight of model without motor 200g, maximum weight of rubber motor 30g. Also known as "Wakefields" after the prestigous trophy which is the award at the World Championships. Typical models have a wing span of 1.8m and climb to an altitude of at least 80m while the propeller running. The initial climb is vertical aided by a powerful launch, sometimes having the start of the propeller delayed until about a second after launch, becoming less steep before the propeller folds after about 40 seconds.

Of course it is possible the AMA will use “rubber engine”, but we normally are not interested in that.
Cees

Edit,

Hanna was reading with me and she did ask my attention for the fact see still has 3 containers of the past I was an armament and ejection seat engineer. Look at these containers. Period F84 Thunderstreak, (N)F5 and F104. Made in the USA.
We use these to store our drawings. Or do I have to say plans.?
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Last edited by Taurus Flyer; Nov 07, 2011 at 05:07 AM. Reason: Rocket motor
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Old Nov 07, 2011, 05:09 AM
Whatever works well .
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Just a little thing, not to get too upset over . Seems the teminology has been rather weakly defined over the years. The main element to communication is understanding. So long as everyone understands , no need to question I guess.

From Wiki:

"TerminologyOriginally an engine was a mechanical device that converted force into motion. Military devices such as catapults, trebuchets and battering rams are referred to as siege engines. The term "gin" as in cotton gin is recognised as a short form of the Old French word engin, in turn from the Latin ingenium, related to ingenious. Most devices used in the industrial revolution were referred to as engines, and this is where the steam engine gained its name.[citation needed]

In modern usage, the term is used to describe devices capable of performing mechanical work, as in the original steam engine. In most cases the work is produced by exerting a torque or linear force, which is used to operate other machinery which can generate electricity, pump water, or compress gas. In the context of propulsion systems, an air-breathing engine is one that uses atmospheric air to oxidise the fuel carried rather than supplying an independent oxidizer, as in a rocket.

In common usage, an engine burns or otherwise consumes fuel, and is differentiated from an electric machine (i.e., electric motor) that derives power without changing the composition of matter.[3] A heat engine may also serve as a prime mover, a component that transforms the flow or changes in pressure of a fluid into mechanical energy.[4] An automobile powered by an internal combustion engine may make use of various motors and pumps, but ultimately all such devices derive their power from the engine.

The term motor was originally used to distinguish the new internal combustion engine-powered vehicles from earlier vehicles powered by steam engines, such as the steam roller and motor roller, but may be used to refer to any engine.[citation needed]

Devices converting heat energy into motion are referred to as engines,.[5]
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Old Nov 07, 2011, 05:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by datsunguy View Post
Engineering definition: Motors run on electricity. Everything else is an engine. They are steam ENGINES not steam motors. Internal combustion engines not motors, rocket engines not motors, jet engines not motors,etc.

Just because loads of people use the wrong term doesn't make it correct.
As I am a licensed naval engineer (Chief Engineer all ships, no limits to power, no limits to cargo, no limits to anything at all), and I seem to be completely ignorant to this, I am wondering: where do you get that "engineering definition"?? Have not learned about it when I was in college, not in my 20 years at sea, or when reading the compulsory "trade literature"

To be honest: it is fairly silly to define things as such and therefore no engineering society that I know of, will burn its hands to such a definition.

A "motor" is generally considered to be anything that brings motion into motionless objects, with the help of an energy source, may that be internal or external, stored or converted. That is just the basis of the word, originating from Latin. Looking very basically, even a sail can be considered a motor. Nobody does it, but what is the difference between a sail on a boat, and a blade in a steam turbine? (other than the medium and the construction material)

An engine is simply a "contraption that does something".... generally considered to be slightly more complex. This can even be a virtual thing, on the web we have "search engines" dont we?

Even, it is possible to use a sentence like: "A vessel is motorized with a steam engine" or something similar.

Equally, to keep in line with Oskartek's post: we are talking about a motorcar, motorbike, motorplane, motorvessel, etc etc, and they are all usually far from electrically driven. And sir, those are recognized engineering terms.

And finally: Yes, some of them are steam motors: back in the days when IC engines were not yet common, in England some company that buit steam tractors, also built steam powered cargo trucks (don't remember the name of that company unfortunately), and they were calling their engine a "steam motor".
It was built more like a common engine (trunk pistons, crankcase, steam admission by valves in the head in stead of slides outside the cylinder...).
Now I really do not know if they called it a motor because of these design fetures or for any other reason, but it is a fact that the manufacturer called it a steam motor, not a steam engine.

Brgds, Bert
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Old Nov 07, 2011, 07:23 AM
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In my mind a motor converts electrical energy into mechanical energy and an engine converts fossil fuels into mechanical energy. While I was growing up I never heard anyone call this a motor. This Fairbanks Morse 200 cu in engine was one of my earliest toys. It made a screaming 3.5 hp at 310 rpm.
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Old Nov 07, 2011, 07:37 AM
Whatever works well .
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United States, MI, Marysville
Joined Apr 2010
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A minor point in semantics , that's all.

Like the Capacitor-Condensor thing. Generally no big deal. As noted , in days gone by the terms had been used with virtual interchange . The catapults that flung rocks long before steam "engines" and electric "motors" were ever conceived had been called "engines". Our own planes have been powered by rubber "motors" . LEDs that end light light pipes are called "light engines" regardless of their weight .
Many of the gasoline powered auto companies were called motor car makers . Itobor and I both ride "motor"cycles and rarely does anyone insist we call them "engine"cycles.
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