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Old Aug 22, 2014, 02:28 PM
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United States, ME, South Portland
Joined Jun 2014
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scaling up and down plan

Hi all

i don't think you can just enlarge or make smaller the planes to a plan. So what do need do to up scale or down scale to keep all the # working and or stay in scale ( if you want)
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Old Aug 22, 2014, 02:41 PM
Registered User
Staffs, UK
Joined Nov 2003
10,562 Posts
Why can't you just enlarge or reduce a plan ? It's worked for me several times. Of course you may need to adjust wood sizes etc. if you go far from the original.

Steve
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Old Aug 22, 2014, 05:22 PM
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Albuquerque, NM USA
Joined Sep 2003
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Depends on how much you scale it. If you double the size you may also need to do things like increase the number of ribs and formers, or change some of the structure to make it stronger, like landing gear and the LG mounts.

charlie
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Old Aug 24, 2014, 03:14 AM
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United States, CA, Norco
Joined Feb 2007
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Photoshop works best for me. Every plan I get I have scanned to get a tif file of the plan.

From this point on I can scale it, in Photoshop, symmetrically or just in the vertical or horizontal plane. I can also flatten it, stretch it, compress it, or fatten it, to what ever I want.

After Scaling a plan down the first thing I look at is the rib spacing seems to me that standard rib spacing is between 2.5 and 2.75 inches on .25 to .60 sized plans. So I adjust the spacing accordingly subtracting a rib or 2 when scaling down or adding a rib or 2 if scaling up.

Fuse formers seem to scale so that you don't need to subtract when scaling down or add when scaling up.

Edit----

Here's an example of how to scale ribs up or down. You can also use the same method to scale the rest of an existing paper plan.
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Last edited by Roguedog; Aug 24, 2014 at 04:13 AM. Reason: Added a rib scaling article
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Old Aug 24, 2014, 09:50 AM
David
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United States, TX, Houston
Joined Mar 2012
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Roguedog, this is excellent. I will be using this today. I have scalled up a ff design with tapered wings 200% and need to add a rib to each bay. I have always plotted a second set of ribs and drawn a line around the perimeter half the difference between it and the next smaller rib outline. It has never been perfect, but close enough. I'll give this method a try.
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Old Aug 24, 2014, 10:19 AM
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United States, TX
Joined Jun 2011
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I simply take the plans I want to enlarge, to a good print shop and have them enlarge it.
Yes, you have to deal with some issues, but they're not hard to deal with.
Take for example, that 1/8" runners will appear 1/4" thick if you enlarge it 200%.
That doesn't mean you HAVE to use 1/4" runners. You can still use your 1/8" and just compensate on your building table. I've done it many times.

Charlie's right about # of ribs. Sometimes, you end up with ribs that are just too far apart. When I enlarged my Vampire to 38" wingspan from the original Jetex plans that were about half that size, my wing ribs were so far apart that I ended up doubling the number of ribs.

So you compensate on the fly, where you have to, to make the enlarged plan work.
But also keep in mind that enlarging might also mean you need to introduce a couple of improvements, such as a ply dihedral brace for the wing instead of just balsa.
Overall, it's not that hard. And going to a print shop is not that complicated either.
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Old Sep 12, 2014, 06:32 PM
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United States, FL, Chuluota
Joined Jul 2013
137 Posts
I just resized a set of plans at Staples. They have a large priner that scans your plan then they put in the percentage, mine happened to be down sizing and then it printed the new size. But this took two trips as the first person scanned it into their computer then resized it and when it printed it was the wrong size plus she hit size to the page which through it off shape. The second person did it just with the printer and it turned out perfect.
Bob
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Old Sep 13, 2014, 08:23 AM
The Junk Man
Jacksonville, Florida
Joined Jul 2006
1,489 Posts
After literally decades of manually altering plans for the size wanted, I started using CAD to do the job and have never been happier. I was lucky enough to get to try Solidworks for 7 or 8 months (before my son's company wanted the laptop and seat back ) and Rhino before it was sold as part of a startup graphic business I owned. Both were outstanding. And Rhino is even pretty affordable as these things go. Solidworks is not... many thousands of dollars.

But I came back to SketchUp. Free, several bazillion free tutorials on the web, and a huge userbase that produces many plugins to greatly increase the usability of the program.

It is perfectly capable of doing everything a modeler needs to do.

Then, scaling plans you have done yourself or traced into the program becomes a two-click operation.

Tom
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Old Sep 13, 2014, 09:31 AM
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United States, FL, Chuluota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T_om View Post
After literally decades of manually altering plans for the size wanted, I started using CAD to do the job and have never been happier. I was lucky enough to get to try Solidworks for 7 or 8 months (before my son's company wanted the laptop and seat back ) and Rhino before it was sold as part of a startup graphic business I owned. Both were outstanding. And Rhino is even pretty affordable as these things go. Solidworks is not... many thousands of dollars.

But I came back to SketchUp. Free, several bazillion free tutorials on the web, and a huge userbase that produces many plugins to greatly increase the usability of the program.

It is perfectly capable of doing everything a modeler needs to do.
Then, scaling plans you have done yourself or traced into the program becomes a two-click operation.

Tom
Thanks Tom, I might try that
Bob
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Old Sep 15, 2014, 06:05 PM
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United States, ME, South Portland
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this is very good thank to all
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Old Sep 15, 2014, 08:53 PM
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United States, MI, Roseville
Joined Dec 2000
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You want a vector image to scale, not a raster. Scaling in PS scales line weights, and can result in some pretty wonky lines. If you can get a Vector file, that's best, as the line weight can stay the same but the dimensions will change.
Mark
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Old Sep 16, 2014, 01:45 AM
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United States, CA, Norco
Joined Feb 2007
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What you say is true. The problem is that I don't even think the Current RCMplans facility has the original prints let alone a vector file.

Of the five plans I purchased, when it was RCMMagazine.com before the change to RCMplans.com, 4 seemed like they were made from a copy, not a copy from the original mask, vellum, blueprint, cad file, or vector file. All had wavy lines like the master had shrank in several places. Now you could say that maybe the copy I got shrank in transit. Could be.

I can say this, even the plans I purchased had thick lines and of the plans that I enlarged through PS the plans I enlarged were not any thicker than those I bought.

I do know that if you use the scanning software to enlarge a plan that it makes some seriously fat lines.

It all depends on how you use the tools at you're disposal and of course if you had it in a vector format scaling would be a cinch.
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