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Old Apr 12, 2014, 03:03 AM
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Originally Posted by D design View Post
Hydrographics or HydroGraphics, also known as immersion printing, water transfer printing, water transfer imaging, or hydro dipping, is a method of applying printed designs to three-dimensional surfaces. The hydrographic process can be used on metal, plastic, glass, hard woods, and various other materials. Also known as "hydro dipping".

In the process, the substrate piece to be printed is pre-treated and a base coat material is applied. A polyvinyl alcohol film is gravure-printed with the graphic image to be transferred, and is then floated on the surface of a vat of water.[1] An activator chemical is sprayed on the film to dissolve it into a liquid and activate a bonding agent. The piece is then lowered into the vat, through the floating ink layer, which wraps around and adheres to it.[2]


After removing the piece from the water, a top coat is applied to protect the design. With multiple dippings, hydrographics printing can achieve full 360 coverage of the part surface, including small crevices.

heres a video of it happening: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNv9O1wRiKs
Wiki seems to be your friend, just give her/him credit for it next time...

The CF sock is not a performance thing for me. Maybe a bit of bling but mostly it's to avoid dinging the bulb. I have filled and sanded too much for that to happen as easily as it does now that it is just spray painted.

Right now, the issue is that it's hard to find CF sock here in China. So, I might just give it a coat of epoxy.
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Old Apr 12, 2014, 05:02 AM
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Australia, VIC, Melbourne
Joined Apr 2013
132 Posts
Hydro dipping

Quote:
Originally Posted by D design View Post
Hydrographics or HydroGraphics, also known as immersion printing, water transfer printing, water transfer imaging, or hydro dipping, is a method of applying printed designs to three-dimensional surfaces. The hydrographic process can be used on metal, plastic, glass, hard woods, and various other materials. Also known as "hydro dipping".

In the process, the substrate piece to be printed is pre-treated and a base coat material is applied. A polyvinyl alcohol film is gravure-printed with the graphic image to be transferred, and is then floated on the surface of a vat of water.[1] An activator chemical is sprayed on the film to dissolve it into a liquid and activate a bonding agent. The piece is then lowered into the vat, through the floating ink layer, which wraps around and adheres to it.[2]

After removing the piece from the water, a top coat is applied to protect the design. With multiple dippings, hydrographics printing can achieve full 360 coverage of the part surface, including small crevices.

heres a video of it happening: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNv9O1wRiKs
Wow, not room in my shed for that set up! I'll stick with the pressure pack and w&w. I find sanding quite therapeutic !
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Old Apr 12, 2014, 08:27 AM
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Canada, BC, Campbell River
Joined Oct 2012
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I spent a lot of time trying to get a smooth finish on my bulbs using epoxy by itself. I could never get it smooth. The epoxy would form rivulets on the bulb and I would always sand through the thin spots before I got the thick spots sanded out. this lead to a vicious circle of epoxying and sanding. I realized finally that if I had a layer of cloth on the bulb it would stop the epoxy from forming rivulets and sanding would be straight forward. From there it was just a couple of steps to a CF tube. It does look trick but I paint my fin and bulb white so I can see the weeds. The next time I will just use a fiberglass tube. It's cheaper and will accomplish what I want-a smooth bulb.
Don
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Old Apr 12, 2014, 08:40 AM
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United States, MI, Bloomfield Hills
Joined Feb 2010
417 Posts
I haven't tried it on my bulb but many years ago I used West System 413 Graphite Powder on the the bottom of my A Cat and the rudders and dagger boards. It is hard to sand and makes a big mess but it is hard as nails, and slippery. Might be worth a try.

All I do on my IOM bulb is paint with light grey primer and wet sand, easy to look after and very easy to add another coat when it gets scratched up. Plus it makes me feel faster when I make it all pretty and smooth.
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Old Apr 12, 2014, 09:59 AM
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Joined Feb 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Case View Post
I spent a lot of time trying to get a smooth finish on my bulbs using epoxy by itself. I could never get it smooth. The epoxy would form rivulets on the bulb and I would always sand through the thin spots before I got the thick spots sanded out. this lead to a vicious circle of epoxying and sanding. I realized finally that if I had a layer of cloth on the bulb it would stop the epoxy from forming rivulets and sanding would be straight forward. From there it was just a couple of steps to a CF tube. It does look trick but I paint my fin and bulb white so I can see the weeds. The next time I will just use a fiberglass tube. It's cheaper and will accomplish what I want-a smooth bulb.
Don
Yup, I am totally with you and I was pretty sure that was the main benefit of a sleeve - to kinda just hold on the epoxy and give it something to create a smoother surface off of.
But good to be warned of the potential vicious circle of painting with epoxy. I was hoping if I thinned the epoxy I would be OK. I'll drop that idea for now. Not worth it.

I have always liked primer for things like this. I used to race a small keelboat owned by my local club but after a few seasons of haggling them we were finally allowed to just sand off all the anti-faul paint, re-prime it and leave it at that. We used a 2K primer and as Ted says, so easy to sand to absolute perfection.
Thing is, I don't have access to neither West or a good 2K primer but I'll keep looking.
For now, I'll just be extra careful and on my next Europe or US trip I'll stock up on some primer or CF/GF sleeve.

Or start making friends with a local car paint shop...;-)

Thanks guys.
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Old Apr 12, 2014, 10:37 AM
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Barbados
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TedFlack View Post
I haven't tried it on my bulb but many years ago I used West System 413 Graphite Powder on the the bottom of my A Cat and the rudders and dagger boards. It is hard to sand and makes a big mess but it is hard as nails, and slippery. Might be worth a try.

All I do on my IOM bulb is paint with light grey primer and wet sand, easy to look after and very easy to add another coat when it gets scratched up. Plus it makes me feel faster when I make it all pretty and smooth.
I use the west system 422 barrier coat and if mixed thick that stuff is also tuff as nails and a bitc to sand,i also apply to the bows of my big cat for beach landing,with 20+ people on board it's a good grind in the sand and takes quite a while to wear down .Years ago I did Tony's old Cockatoo that boat is still around with an unscrached bulb,but it took some sanding to get it right.
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Old Apr 13, 2014, 05:26 AM
NORTHLAND NEW ZEALAND
New Zealand, Northland, Totara North
Joined Feb 2012
480 Posts
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Originally Posted by dhphoto View Post
Wiki seems to be your friend, just give her/him credit for it next time...

The CF sock is not a performance thing for me. Maybe a bit of bling but mostly it's to avoid dinging the bulb. I have filled and sanded too much for that to happen as easily as it does now that it is just spray painted.

Right now, the issue is that it's hard to find CF sock here in China. So, I might just give it a coat of epoxy.
if thats the case, just add antimony to produce hypoeutectic lead antimony alloy to have very robust lead
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Old Apr 13, 2014, 10:24 AM
Don't lie to my dog.
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United States, DE, Wilmington
Joined Jun 2005
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Originally Posted by Glen131 View Post
I recall reading a spec sheet for a Britpop! from Vinaixa Yachts. They are using 2 layers of 165gm/m2, about 5.8oz, S-glass....
I just used that schedule to lay up a hull and got wonderful results. Very stiff and very light.
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Old Apr 13, 2014, 12:51 PM
David Cook Victoria, BC Canada
Joined Oct 2012
193 Posts
My PP5 layup is 3 layers of 3oz and PP6 is 2 layers of 2.5 oz. sandwiched around 1 layer of 4 oz. I used to use a 0.75 oz. as the finish layer to prevent/minimize pinholes but I found it was hard to lay out and the 2.5 worked fine.
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Old Apr 13, 2014, 12:58 PM
Don't lie to my dog.
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United States, DE, Wilmington
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Originally Posted by PorkyPig View Post
My PP5 layup is 3 layers of 3oz and PP6 is 2 layers of 2.5 oz. sandwiched around 1 layer of 4 oz. I used to use a 0.75 oz. as the finish layer to prevent/minimize pinholes but I found it was hard to lay out and the 2.5 worked fine.
What is your hull weight out of the mold?
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Old Apr 13, 2014, 11:20 PM
David Cook Victoria, BC Canada
Joined Oct 2012
193 Posts
That's a hard one to answer because the last hull we laid up included the foredeck built-in. It weighed 434 will all f/g items included but not trimmed. The last bare hull we laid up here was PP4-2 which weighed 216 grams. PP4-1 was 198 which was too light.
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