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Old Aug 17, 2011, 08:59 PM
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United States, TN, Franklin
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When to and How to use mixing control with DX6i

I think the title says it all. I have the Dynam A10 4 channel plane. Will I benefit from using the mixing control?
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Old Aug 17, 2011, 09:31 PM
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H2SO4's Avatar
Australia, New South Wales, Sydney
Joined Jan 2011
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The ability to mix one channel into another is simply a tool. Most 4ch planes can fly with no mixing at all, but judicious use of the transmitter's mixing capabilities can potentially make the pilot's life easier, more interesting, more entertaining, or all of the above.

The details are almost always plane-specific, and as such your question would probably be answered with more authority on a "Dynam A10" thread where it's most likely to get attention from a bunch of people who are very familiar with the airframe and its idiosyncracies. If such a thread doesn't exist (I don't know), you might wish to consider starting one.
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Old Aug 18, 2011, 04:38 AM
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eflightray's Avatar
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Joined Mar 2003
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Here's a couple of possible mixes, but as H2SO4 said, it depends on the plane.

Mix rudder in with aileron, to give slightly smoother flatter 'coordinated' turns. But you should be using both sticks to fly well anyway.

Mix elevator in with throttle, can be useful on ducted fan models where the thrust line cannot be adjusted, and the trim changes with max throttle. But there is nothing to stop you using the elevator trim anyway.

When it comes to precision aerobatics, (and the right sort of model), then there are other mixes that can be helpful.
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Old Jun 14, 2012, 02:58 PM
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appa609's Avatar
Ontario, Canada.
Joined Aug 2008
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I like using elevon mix for aerobatic planes. I don't know about an A-10.
Flaperons are always helpful.
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Old Jun 18, 2012, 03:32 PM
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If you must ask the answer is absolutely NOT... Now, after you get some stick time and have an idea what's happening then maybe....
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Old Jun 18, 2012, 03:45 PM
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RE: Mixing

THe most common mixing is of course rudder + aileron. The main reason for the mix is because it does make the take off a little easier for some.
1) Using the rudder to steer as you are taxing to take off, the ailerons do help a bit on the steering part
2) some do a better job steering as they take off using ailerons

He is an example: A friend of mine uses that mix as he is taking off.As he gets off the ground i've seen him stugle with getting it under control.If you are lifting off the ground and still using the rudder to steer it straight the plane will bank and in most cases crash. By using the aileron mix he is able to steer and keep the plane in complete control while lifting off the ground
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Old Jun 18, 2012, 06:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helifreak1 View Post
THe most common mixing is of course rudder + aileron. The main reason for the mix is because it does make the take off a little easier for some.
1) Using the rudder to steer as you are taxing to take off, the ailerons do help a bit on the steering part
2) some do a better job steering as they take off using ailerons

He is an example: A friend of mine uses that mix as he is taking off.As he gets off the ground i've seen him stugle with getting it under control.If you are lifting off the ground and still using the rudder to steer it straight the plane will bank and in most cases crash. By using the aileron mix he is able to steer and keep the plane in complete control while lifting off the ground
I understand why mixing in a bit of rudder with the ailerons can be used to effect "coordinated" turns once the plane is well and truly up in the air, thus gaining the ability to bank, but I don't understand why ailerons would be of any help on the ground.

While taxiing, wheels are presumably remaining on the ground during turns, unless you get a little wild

Why would the ailerons have any positive effect on turning ability before the plane is high enough to roll? Given the slow speeds, the amount of aileron would presumably have to be massive to produce any effect at all. Wouldn't the added drag just hamper smooth rudder turns on the ground?
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Old Jun 19, 2012, 01:30 PM
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United States, AZ, Mesa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H2SO4 View Post
I understand why mixing in a bit of rudder with the ailerons can be used to effect "coordinated" turns once the plane is well and truly up in the air, thus gaining the ability to bank, but I don't understand why ailerons would be of any help on the ground.
I would go so far as to say his statement is flat out incorrect. I've been doing this many years and the most common mix I've seen in use is Ailerons->Rudder. That is, moving the ailerons causes the rudder to move (in the same direction). Rudder->Aileron mixing is almost never used. The second most common things I've seen is Throttle->elevator which is common on motor gliders - we don't want to trim the elevator permanently because we want to maintain the proper trim for gliding, but when the plane is under power it can have a strong tendency to pull up and stall, so we mix a little down elevator with the throttle.

Flaperons and delta mixing is a permanent setup which the plane would always need, so it's not a mix that you would put on a control switch. If the plane is a flaperon or delta type, it doesn't change, as that's a property of the airframe itself and if the plane needs that type of control, it is always needed.
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Old Jun 19, 2012, 04:56 PM
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I think its fun to experiment with mixes. But I didn't start playing with mixes before after flying for some time. On some fast gliders, spoilerons can be useful. When you want to land it in front of you, and not float the whole field.

.
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Old Jun 19, 2012, 07:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasmine2501 View Post
I would go so far as to say his statement is flat out incorrect. I've been doing this many years and the most common mix I've seen in use is Ailerons->Rudder. That is, moving the ailerons causes the rudder to move (in the same direction). Rudder->Aileron mixing is almost never used.
My understanding of helifreak1's post is that he's mixing aileron into rudder input (the option you described as "almost never used"), in order to have the ailerons somehow help with the rudder's directional control on the ground.

I'm not saying it's incorrect. I just don't understand the mechanics of why it would work, and I was hoping that helifreak1 or someone else would explain.
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Old Jun 21, 2012, 10:14 AM
An Ordinary User
United States, VA, Fluvanna
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Quote:
1) Using the rudder to steer as you are taxing to take off, the ailerons do help a bit on the steering part
2) some do a better job steering as they take off using ailerons
This might be true if the plane has a 1:1 or more thrust/weight ratio and the motor is nearly WOT but your average powered scale plane won't have enough airflow over the ailerons at takeoff (or landing) to make them effective.


Quote:
He is an example: A friend of mine uses that mix as he is taking off.As he gets off the ground i've seen him stugle with getting it under control.If you are lifting off the ground and still using the rudder to steer it straight the plane will bank and in most cases crash. By using the aileron mix he is able to steer and keep the plane in complete control while lifting off the ground
If the plane is banking at takeoff your friend needs more finesse. Even short takeoffs can be done smoothly without mixing. What I would do is stop using the rudder while the plane is in transition from steering with the wheel to steering with the rudder. Once the wheels are off the ground then make small corrections with the rudder until enough airflow is over the wings to make the ailerons effective.

The wings do drop a little when the rudder is used. Too much deflection at a slow speed will result in a wing dropping a lot and if you are barely off the ground a crash is likely. Using the ailerons to prevent the inside wing from dropping only works if there is a lot of airflow over the ailerons.
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