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Old Apr 05, 2013, 06:01 PM
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Arceenut's Avatar
Canada, BC, Langley
Joined Nov 2007
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I have no desire to educate the world on the differences in the process of burning fuel to produce mechanical energy. If someone wants to call an engine a Flubergofast and everyone understand what it is, then the name is appropriate, whether the process is true fluber action or not. I am quite happy to take my plane, powered by an alcohol fueled, catalytic ignited engine and enjoy a great day in the open air and make a number of holes in the sky. If anyone wants to correct me on my terminology you will find a a very uninterested person telling them to plainly b*gger off or even more explicit bodily functional terms. I am not that anal that a common usage term (technically incorrect it may be), as long as it is understood by the fact of common usage, is OK with me.
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Old Apr 05, 2013, 09:45 PM
Balsadustus Producerus
Escondido, CA USA
Joined Jan 2001
1,003 Posts
So is a hit-n-miss engine two or four stroke? Why can't we have steam motors? Is a compressed air powerplant an engine or a motor?

I'll go fly my Aquila sailplane an' that'll fix youse guys
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Old Apr 06, 2013, 07:39 AM
Two left thumbs
Muncie, IN
Joined Sep 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Balsabird View Post
So is a hit-n-miss engine two or four stroke? )
A four stroke. "Hit -n'-miss" refers to the method of governing speed by holding the exhaust valve open mechanically via mechanical governor, but they are simple Otto cycle engines. A bit low on power to weight for model airplanes, though!

PS: the Wikipedia article on them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hit-and-miss_engine
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Old Apr 06, 2013, 07:43 AM
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United States, MD, Elkton
Joined Oct 2011
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Balsabird- you ain't done yet !!ha ha-what do you call the 'propulsion system' of your glider ?

Can't be gravity-that's pulling it down........can't be thermals, cause they won't lift it from the floor........can't be wind,-'cause it doesn't always blow.......not Solar, if the sun's not shining.......rubber bands only stretch so far.........

You understand-I'm only doing this to clarify it for myself...
My head hurts again !!
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Last edited by epoxyearl; Apr 06, 2013 at 09:04 AM.
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Old Apr 06, 2013, 08:07 AM
Complete RC Idiot Savant
The Netherlands
Joined Nov 2009
2,765 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arceenut View Post
I have no desire to educate the world on the differences in the process of burning fuel to produce mechanical energy. If someone wants to call an engine a Flubergofast and everyone understand what it is, then the name is appropriate, whether the process is true fluber action or not. I am quite happy to take my plane, powered by an alcohol fueled, catalytic ignited engine and enjoy a great day in the open air and make a number of holes in the sky. If anyone wants to correct me on my terminology you will find a a very uninterested person telling them to plainly b*gger off or even more explicit bodily functional terms. I am not that anal that a common usage term (technically incorrect it may be), as long as it is understood by the fact of common usage, is OK with me.

It is not a matter of being anal (or whatever more graphic bodily function you intend to use in the future).

It is because most people first get themselves acustomed to using the wrong terminology, THEN thinking they use the correct wording (like you did when you called all compression ignited engines "diesel") and it gets really interesting when people like that, are going to try and solve problems or try to start experimenting.....

A very nice example I had the other day, when I was telling folks about my "glow converted to spark" engines and how they run on zero-nitro, 15% oil fuel.
One of the interested persons that wanted to try this too, but not blessed with the use and understanding of correct terminiology, thought the fuel normally referred to as "nitro" needed change when using spark-ignition, and he tried to run his engine on 85% gas, 15% Methanol. He was not triggered by "spark means gas" but merely reasoning: "fuel is called Nitro so the biggest component must be Nitro, he says no nitro so let's replace the biggest component for something else...."

And therefore, I do not give a flying F.... what your opinion about me is....
I am merely trying to help people gain knowledge, IF they want to understand.... if you are not interested in educating yourself, then just don't read what I write, because in that case, I was not writing it for you in the first place.

For all others, I am happy to share knowledge, and being fully aware that I am not flawless, seriously express the wish, might I be wrong, for others to correct me, so I can improve myself too where necessary....

With highest regards, Bert
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Old Apr 06, 2013, 11:23 AM
Two left thumbs
Muncie, IN
Joined Sep 2006
4,243 Posts
Amen, Bert. I started this thread for educational purposes. Nobody knows everything, and even experts sometimes disagree, but we HAVE shown how and why various types of engines work. We've strayed from the thread title, but most of the posts are in the spirit of its original intent.

While we don't need to be fanatically precise, Bert's above example reveals why a certain precision in our speech can be critical. Here's a very expensive example: http://articles.latimes.com/1999/oct/01/news/mn-17288
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Old Apr 06, 2013, 01:08 PM
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United States, GA, Loganville
Joined Aug 2012
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