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Old Nov 09, 2014, 01:38 PM
Paratrooper
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Eubank Kentucky
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Dan

Some beautiful tack maneuvers this time. I can remember so very well having to recover a failed tack with the tried and true method of setting a new course through that wonderful invention of square rigged ship captains--the WEAR.

I did not notice before that you had stowed your starboard carronades.

Watching your ship brings back a nostalgia when we sailed together and tried to gain position to fire a broadside. Once in a while I miss Surprise........

Great video. And I used to entertain boat people by hauling along side their craft and sending a broadside in their general direction. We had some great times on the lake. I appreciate your video.

RG
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Old Nov 10, 2014, 07:27 AM
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Awesome video. (PERIOD)

I hope to ask to sail in company next year. That would be two brigs in company...reminds me of 1813. I could also bring a schooner and cutter for other captains. We could search for the British
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Old Feb 16, 2015, 10:32 AM
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NOT scale sail...

NOT scale sail, but this is my tug Rosco II, just finished after over 6 years of delays.
Now maybe I can chase Syren down when she runs away, as she often does...

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showp...1&postcount=86

Next, re-rig Syren for easier transport in the car again.
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Old Feb 16, 2015, 12:22 PM
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United States, CA, San Jose
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Great looking tug, Dan!!

Think I'll need about 4 of those in a week or so. ha ha

Back to the video of Syren for a sec. Your maneuvers are beautifully executed. Hope I can do that one day. I think however, my favorite part of the whole thing is the two young boys in the ski boat looking at Syren as she sailed by. I think of my brother and me, and if that was us at that age......we'd be going NUTS!

Very nice!

best
Tim
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Old Feb 16, 2015, 03:54 PM
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Nice tug. Seeing it brought up some questions about it's use that I've been thinking about for my upcoming sailing season.

Do you envision it as a chase boat to capture and return your sailing model? Lets say that you have lost your radio signal on the brig. Is the tug fast enough to catch the brig?

Do you envision it to assist in groundings? If so, would you push against the brig's hull to get it back into proper depth? Or, would you hook onto the brig with the tug and tow the brig out? If so, where do you plan to hook on?
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Old Feb 16, 2015, 07:00 PM
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I was totally joking. The tug can slowly pull a person in a kayak, but using it to handle the shifting forces of the brig would be impossible. I have to paddle really hard and fast to tow her with any headwind at all.
In recovery cases, I have a heck of a time controlling Syren from alongside in the kayak as direction of travel and/or wind change. I use a long tow line and need to be sure I paddle fast enough and control course (usually indirect) to get her back home.
Once on a towline, things get complicated.
I learned early on to program the Tx/Rx in failsafe mode. That is, if signal is lost, the servo settings go to pre-set conditions. I set the rudder to neutral and the fore and main yards opposite at about 35-40 degrees.
Early on, I once lost her with sails set for a run. She put the wind, strong that day, behind her and took off from me. The main fuse blew and I had no control. I paddled the kayak as fast as I could and she went at least a few hundred yards before I caught her. A fishing boat towed me in the kayak and Syren behind back to the landing.
That's what led to changing the servo system, electrical design, etc etc.
Sailing these big ones offers all sorts of thrills....
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Old Feb 16, 2015, 08:21 PM
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Nothing like instilling fear before I even get to the water! ha ha
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Old Feb 17, 2015, 10:58 PM
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Re: rescue of a model squarerigger

In one of the Hornblower books, he has his men secretly rig a drogue to a privateer (or slaver, can't remember which) while it overnights in a harbor. The drogue is tied to the rudder, and is rigged in a collapsed condition. I envision a parachute with the canopy top forward. When the privateer leaves in the morning, she goes fast, and the line holding the parachute top breaks under the strain. The chute fills, and tears off the rudder. The privateer ends up partially dismasted. Hornblower's vessel catches up and captures the ship.

Well, no reason to go to that extreme, but you could rig a failsafe to deploy a drogue attached to a strong part of the hull to slow the vessel so you could catch it.

I can attest to the difficulty of catching and towing a model ship back to port. My Vacutug could hardly catch up with Pamir when I made practice rescues. And towing home against the wind was not possible in anything but light airs. Setting the yards to make the vessel heave to, per DanL's failsafe setup is an ingenious solution. Sometimes the old ways are the best :-)
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Old Feb 18, 2015, 01:23 AM
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Brooks - your drogue/sea anchor idea gives me a thought...
I haven't had a servo or fuse failure in a long time, but at times things get a little hairy - wind gusts pick up, the boat is heading for the weeds, etc etc. - stuff happens.
So, maybe instead of adding drag, we cut thrust. Say that the sail clews are all sheeted to a common connection. On loss of power, or on Tx signal, that connection releases and all the sails go free, flapping in the wind. Letting off the accelerator vs putting on the brakes.
Pros and cons of that?
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Old Feb 18, 2015, 11:40 AM
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Ships would do something like that, releasing or cutting the sheets. But only when in dire danger, eg. a knockdown. The sails would be destroyed (flapped to death), and the vibration on the yards might break them, or break the topmasts. If the alternative was the hull filling with water and sinking, then the loss of spars/masts/sails would be a small price to pay.

Letting the sheets fly, as you propose, will not remove all wind force. Holding a flag in a strong wind takes effort, after all. I guess I'd save the procedure for dire circumstances, loss of the vessel, and the like...just like the real sailors did.

I've noticed that when my free-sailing square riggers backwinded, and got stuck in a heave-to position, they did not move very fast. That was frustrating - I'd be waiting for them to drift back to shore so I could adjust the braces so that they were less likely to headup too much again :-) My fin keels would keep them, usually, from grounding the hull (fin grounds first, a few feet off shore). If you sail in areas with riprap along the banks, maybe your heave-to, along with a slanted rod attached to your keel (to increase draft) might work - the heave-to to allow you time to get a towline attached, and the rod to keep hull off the rocks if the ship beats you to shore. A slanted rod, as opposed to a vertical one, would lessen the chance that wave motion, when grounded, would punch the rod up through the hull. The rod would act more like a spring, than a dagger. I'd put a hook on the end of the rod, something to catch in the ground. If high winds laid my backwinded ships over, even the fin keel would not be enough to keep the ship from touching the shore.
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Last edited by Brooks; Feb 18, 2015 at 11:46 AM.
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