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Old Oct 22, 2015, 04:18 PM
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The Junk Man
Jacksonville, Florida
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Build Log
Peter Rake Prototype Build - SE2A - Maiden Completed

After blundering around in my last prototype thread getting wrapped around the micro world axle and fighting a printed tissue fiasco, I decided I wanted something a bit bigger than micro next.

I'm not swearing off the little guys (although I loathe "bricks") but weather here usually includes at least SOME wind and micros are not all that happy fighting it.

So, after talking to Pete, two suggestions came up. The SE2A and the GW Meteor. And I may do both if my Hendy 302 and SE5A self-designs do not intervene.. . but I digress.

Pete's 27 1/2 inch SE2A has been kicking around a while, my copy of the plan is marked 2007. I searched the forums to see if anyone had done it. One thread got very far along.... but mysteriously ended with nothing beyond covering. The other one promised never even started. Very curious.

So I will trundle through an attempt at my usual leisurely pace. I like to include a lot of photos and that is a slower process than most realize. Folks looking for speed will have to go to another shop to purchase a case or two.

But I digress, again.

The SE2 and SE2A variant was a "first" of a sorts. The first purpose-built fast scout aircraft. Indeed, the designation S.E. was for "Scout, Experimental".

It had a 7-cylinder 80 hp Gnome engine and was faster than anything previously used as a scout. It was (laughingly) "armed" with two rifles mounted pointing outboard to miss the prop disk! Brits are a funny lot. After that brain fart, armament fell back to a more 'stiff upper lip and right'o Lad ' Webley 450 revolver for the pilot to go banging away at any adversaries. Trivia follows: The Webley 450 was the standard issue British service revolver from 1887 until 1963. From Boers to Bosch, from the Korean Peninsula to the Rhodesian Bush War, the Webley in one form or another was there.

Here are a few photos. Some build stuff should follow tomorrow. Notable in the photos I have run across, the cowl seems to have been altered in shape from one aircraft to another for some reason.

The illustration by W.I. Boucher will be the color scheme used because I already have the latex house paint I always use on doculam (laminating film) and other coverings in hand in the right colors.

Tom
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Old Oct 22, 2015, 04:29 PM
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Three channel or functional wing warping?
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Old Oct 22, 2015, 04:53 PM
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The Junk Man
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Three channel, as designed. I would never attempt a wing-warping build as my interests do not delve into that level of detail.

As long as no one says "nice looking Spitfire" when I show up at the field with this puppy, I'm happy.

Tom
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Old Oct 22, 2015, 06:21 PM
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As long as no one says "nice looking Spitfire" when I show up at the field with this puppy, I'm happy.

Tom
Hopefully they won't say that when they see the SE2.

Larry
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Old Oct 22, 2015, 06:46 PM
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Yes, some of these designs have been hanging around an awful long time. As you say, some get to almost finished level and then, for some reason or another, just stop.

As regards the SE2a (a direct if slightly oblique forebear of the SE5a), lacking an interrupter gear rifles was about as good as it got. Besides, gentleman aviators didn't shoot at each other. Not cricket at all don't you know.
If memory serves correctly, two examples were sent to France for evaluation but seldom flown as they were considered dangerously fast by the pilots of the day. They were much more used to the gentle manners of the Be2 variants - soon to simply become dangerous to fly for just that reason.

As for the model, although the plans still show the GWS IPS unit that was popular at the time of drawing, I don't doubt this one will end up with a 15 or 20 gram outrunner in the nose - along with a bit of church roof to make up the weight.

Pete
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Old Oct 22, 2015, 08:06 PM
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The Junk Man
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Correct Pete, 20 gram outrunner on its way from Heads Up RC here in Sunny Florida. It even has a stick mount adapter included so I won't even have to change much on your original motor mount design.

And speaking of Cricket, my Aussies were quite the cock-up in the Ashes this year. Still, it wasn't a sweep for the Pommies.

And isn't it odd that the series, after all these years, is even up?

Alas, I haven't watched a good test in person since watching Shane Warne at his finest at the WACA in Perth many years ago. WACA was always a bowler's pitch and he was a master. McGrath, Lee, Gilchrist, Waugh, and so many other names gone from the game now. Pity. They were glorious to watch. Australia was reining supreme there for a while.

Tom
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Old Oct 23, 2015, 10:08 AM
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The Junk Man
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A Start

"Every journey begins with a single step", a quote attributed to everyone from an ancient Chinese philosopher to the neighbors cat.

Anyway, here are some baby steps.

First shot shows the plans cut into useful parts and neatly arranged for display on my magnetic board. I might have mentioned before that I LOVE using a magnetic building board.

Charlie at Manzano Laser http://www.manzanolaser.com/ has the cut files for this model and can supply you with beautiful laser cut parts, as he did for me in my first Rake prototype build here: http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2463452

I had my hand hovering over Charlie's "cart" button on this build but decided at the last moment to cut the parts by hand this time. Doing that requires you to get from paper to wood. There are several ways to do that but here are the two I used here.

Way number one is what I use when many identical small parts have to be cut. I make a Formica/masonite template, put it on the balsa sheet, then trim around with a very sharp snap blade knife. I get the thin Formica sheets from the Lowe's next door to my business offices. Go to the laminate sample aisle in the kitchen remodeling section and here will be a bunch there for free. You can get larger samples through the mail for cheap too: http://www.lowes.com/pd_339940-76323...ductId=3657522 Those are the white samples shown in the photos below. They are 25 cents each but are very handy for template making as I also do a lot of hot wire cutting.

I used this template to cut the 34 or so main ribs and it took very little time.

Way number two. For the parts needing fewer repetitions, I used a different technique to get the patterns on the balsa. The parts are brought into PhotoShop, or any image editor, flipped to make a mirror image (so the transferred part will read upright and correctly on the balsa) and printed onto a sheet of release paper.

This release paper is a waste product here at my office and I get a ton of it as we throw it away every day. But it is the same stuff used on the back of, say, Avery peel and stick address labels, etc. You can also use waxed paper from the kitchen.

Do the print (inkjet printers only, there is another technique for transferring laser printer images), lay the paper down on a FLAT surface then place the balsa over the print. Take a roller, in this case a cheap wallpaper roller from Lowes, and roll the balsa down firmly on the print. When the parts image is transferred, the release paper sheet can be cleaned off with a bit of alcohol and used over and over.

Done. This gives you a good, old fashioned, printwood parts sheet. I loved the old printwood kits from my childhood and spent many a pleasant hour cutting out the parts for the inexpensive printwood kits available back those decades ago.

Photos show the process.

You end up with a sack of ribs and move on.

Tomorrow, The Good Lord Willin' And The Creek Don't Rise (Old Southern Term) we will delve into the mysteries of bamboo, one of my favorite building materials.

Tom
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Old Oct 23, 2015, 11:01 AM
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Very, very nice tutorial - thanks!

Gene K
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Old Oct 23, 2015, 09:17 PM
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If all the ribs are the same, you can stack a bunch of blanks together of sheets and cut at once (I actually use my belt sander)

Cut spar slots with a razor saw...all ribs done in about 5 minutes...
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Old Oct 23, 2015, 09:34 PM
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The Junk Man
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If all the ribs are the same, you can stack a bunch of blanks together of sheets and cut at once (I actually use my belt sander)

Cut spar slots with a razor saw...all ribs done in about 5 minutes...
Yes, exactly the way I did the ribs in one of the DH6 wings in my last build thread. I showed this to give folks another tool in their toolkit.

There are many ways to skin each modeling cat.

Tom
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Old Oct 24, 2015, 05:20 AM
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I have used the 'block' method Paul mentions, but find it takes longer to cut the blanks than it does to shape the ribs.

When the second sheet of the plan looks like this, making a printwood kit is probably the quickest option if you aren't coughing up the $25 for laser cut parts.

Pete
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Old Oct 24, 2015, 01:25 PM
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The Junk Man
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Bamboo

I was pleasantly surprised to see Pete call for a bit of bamboo for this build.

It was just for the skids, but still...

I believe bamboo is a grossly overlooked modeling material and should be used more often nowadays as it certainly was in days gone by. Hardly any "old timers" plans or kits omitted bamboo parts here and there.

I am making the wingtip bows out of bamboo. The stuff is outrageously strong for its weight, easily bent into any noodle-like shape desired, and available very inexpensively. In my case, living here in Sunny Florida, all I have to do is walk out into my backyard and cut all I want. If you are not so blessed, then any big box store garden shop, neighborhood garden center, bait shop (cane poles are cheap)... there are tons of sources. If you are really up against the wall, let me know and I will mail you a bundle of the stuff.

People also use the skewers that are available for BBQ and Kebabs, but those are "processed" bamboo, missing one of the most important parts of the bamboo itself... the hard outer skin.

It is that skin that REALLY strengthens any bamboo structure. The only thing to watch for is that when gluing up, the hard skin doesn't like glue very much. So for laminations the photos show how to draw the bamboo through folded 220 grit sandpaper to roughen that outer layer.

The photos show how easily it is split to any desired width. Split down to "pretty close" and plane the rest of the way. The inside material comes off very easily so thinning it down is a piece of cake.

After the tip bows, the next stage is making up the wing panels. The trailing edges have notches and the photos show how I do'em. Two of the hacksaw blades I have here tapped together make a slot exactly 1/16" wide.

To be continued, but with a couple of days intervening helping a friend move.

Stay tuned, or not, entirely up to you. No pressure.

Tom
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Old Oct 24, 2015, 03:34 PM
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Fascinating. I hadn't considered laminating bamboo because it's a fairly heavy wood to begin with (bass is probably a better choice), but it is extremely strong when used for skids. I had a similar size model to this, with a skidded u/c, spin in from around 30 feet - straight onto the skids. They helped absorb some of the impact (bamboo remaining quite flexible) but remained totally unharmed.
For skids I plane and sand the bamboo to shape first, taking care to get rid of the very sharp edges, and then just warm it over a candle before bending. Warm, bend a little, warm some more, bend some more, etc, etc until the curve I want is there. Once the bamboo cools the bend will hold almost indefinitely. Whereas laminating relies on it bending in its thinnest direction, using heat means you can bend it any way you want.
The only stipulation I would make is that the bamboo needs to be fairly fresh. Not as fresh as Tom can get it, but not a piece that's been knocking about for years. The older it gets, the more brittle it gets.

Pete
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Old Oct 24, 2015, 03:39 PM
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The older it gets, the more brittle it gets.
Just like people
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Old Oct 24, 2015, 06:14 PM
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The Junk Man
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Fascinating. I hadn't considered laminating bamboo because it's a fairly heavy wood to begin with ...
Yes, in the size bow on the plan, it would be heavy indeed. But only two very thin laminations are needed here.

I tossed the one (3-layers) in the photos above and used 2 layers instead. They were about 1mm thick and very light.

Heat bending or hot water bending... both work with bamboo.

Marvelous stuff.

Tom
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