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Old Jul 06, 2009, 06:45 PM
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Well, i've found hydrogen (GAS) to be pretty safe. Because it's so hard to contain, if you're not careful it rises up at 20 feet per second (google time warp hydrogen, or rather don't, it might prove what your worrying about). I safely electricly remote ignited abott 1.25L of hydrogen (with .50L being normal air) and it made a loud noise, shot up about 1-2 stories, and came down. It was a little hot, and deformed, but it didn't explode.

I ignited the hydrogen in a normal PET bottle with no kind of nozzle. If you blocked it I think it might get dangerous.

Oh yeah, the carbon electrodes are working really well, but they're really slowly dissolving? What type of place (or battery?) can you get pure carbon from?

edit: Oh yeah, in case anybody was worrying, i'm doing all of this outside, where the gas can just rise up and away.
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Old Aug 10, 2013, 12:39 AM
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Sorry to resurrect a dead thread, although it may be that the thread died with Jak_o_Lantern. Anyway, I'm also interested in the Hydrogen Blimp, so I figured I'd open the thread up again, to carry on JOL's good work, to carry the torch, so to speak.

It is my understanding that the helium atom is heavier (but smaller) than the Hydrogen atom. This has something to do with electron valencies, but it's a good 20 years since I studied it. Furthermore, Hydrogen comes in the H2 molecule, so it would have to be significantly larger than the Helium atom. On this basis I think a balloon would be less porous to H2 than Helium..

I want to try building an FPV blimp, so I figure I'll need a payload of about 3kg (Maybe less). This would require about 3 cubic metres of H2. The cost of the gas at the local BOC shouldn't be too great.

At present (in my blindness) I think my present hurdle will be the envelope. How much would an envelope weigh which is capable of holding 3 cubic metres of gas?

Aside from the impending safety concerns, my notably low IQ and the aforementioned loss of gas through porous materials, are there any other issues I face?

Have any Helium baloon owners out there tried to replace their helium with H2?
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Old Aug 18, 2013, 12:17 AM
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Hi there,
I want to emphasize the explosiveness of H2 and O.
The gas doesn't flame fireball or go pop, no no.
It goes BANG and with that you could (like me) damage your hearing and be deaf for the next 3 days and never have your hearing as good as it was before.
This was with just 0.2liters of H2 and O
Its fun, until an accident happens.
Then you wish you'd just done something else.
I'd recommend wearing earmuffs and glasses, staying outside and exercising a lot of caution.

Or just got to your local florist and get some helium <--- (recommended)
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Old Aug 19, 2013, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Robert_RC View Post
Hi there,

Or just got to your local florist and get some helium <--- (recommended)
Or just don't contaminate your H with O and then proceed to set fire to it.
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Old Aug 19, 2013, 05:04 PM
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Or just don't contaminate your H with O and then proceed to set fire to it.
I know! 0.o

@supplantsalot I think the first step would be to find a material that would hold your gas, then find out how much it weighs for a given surface area, and then proceed to calculate how heavy its going to be for your bag. You would need to solve a algebraic equation for finding how heavy the bag will be and enlarging the bag to compensate for its own weight, all the while taking into account that the payload will be 3kg. Or you could just use trail and error.
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Old Aug 30, 2013, 03:28 AM
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Sorry to hear about your ears. I'll take your advice re earmuffs/glasses. Yep, contamination would be bad.

I'll look for materials...graphene might be too much to hope for right now.
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Old Sep 01, 2013, 01:39 AM
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If it was me doing the project I wouldn't use H2 instead of helium. I wouldn't be able to fly relaxed knowing that its pretty dangerous and such a hazard. Not sure about you but I wouldn't do it.. Really, just spend some money and get some helium.
Its up to you but do yourself a favor and buy some helium.
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Old Apr 04, 2014, 08:38 PM
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I have made hydrogen balloons over many years with no problem explosions.
My generator uses two 60 liter drums, but I have used 20 liter drums and 200 liter drums when different amounts of hydrogen were required. The first drum contains scrap aluminium (beer cans) and is charged with sodium hydroxide solution (drain cleaner flakes from the supermarket, mixed with a couple of liters of water)
Once the hydrogen is being produced, the lid is screwed on and the gas then leaves the first drum through a pipe that goes to the bottom of the second drum which is half filled with water. Taps on the top are used to fill balloons. Every effort is made to keep air out of the system.
My 44 gallon drum setup had three taps so that three people could fill balloons at once.
Everything is done outdoors with no flames or electrical devices nearby. Never had a blow up.
The hydrogen is produced fairly quickly so you need to have everything ready. If filling balloons you need some place like a garage where you can store them until ready for use.
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Old Apr 16, 2014, 11:20 PM
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car fuel cells safer than gasoline possibly.?

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Originally Posted by patrickegan View Post
This is why I'm against the whole hydrogen fuel cell thing. I don't relish my neighbor Leroy tooling on the car in the driveway.
The tech I've seen them talk about that hasn't been implemented yet I don't think is they were talking about hydrogen cells being In THE BODY of the car (like trunk bumper etc) . and even current hydrogen cells for like cars are safer as gasoline spills all under the car when the tank ruptures then at some point catches if hasn't already and the whole car is on fire on the fuel cell it would just burn out for a few minutes with the fire more contained because it's not like a pressure tank.

but all in all hydrogen is scary in high school when you do this trick I think we had it under the hood and had a flame on the top of the neck of the beaker before the electrodes go in you want the gas to burn and not build up and go boom. plus those hoods are awesome. the sulfer iron experiment where you had to break the glass tube was one of my favorites. (all done under the hood)
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Old Apr 16, 2014, 11:34 PM
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In the 1950s, a surplus U.S. Navy blimp (a Goodyear K-Class ship, if I recall correctly) was bought by a German brewery called Underberg for advertising use. They inflated it with hydrogen. It flew safely in spite of the pilot's actions, as he smoked cigarettes in flight and flicked the ashes out of the control car window!


-- Jason
the hindenburg had a smoking lounge with the only lighters allowed onboard by passengers. (they searched people for matches/lighters) and the smoking room was pressurized just enough that hydrogen would not leak into the smoking lounge it was impossible. http://www.airships.net/hindenburg-smoking-room

as for smoking in a goodyear blimp the gondola I guess you would call it??(cockpit,where the pilot(s) are) is pretty open or can be and not pressurized, but still dangerous probably.
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Old Apr 18, 2014, 01:45 PM
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Quote:

as for smoking in a goodyear blimp the gondola I guess you would call it??(cockpit,where the pilot(s) are) is pretty open or can be and not pressurized, but still dangerous probably.
Dangerous to your lungs maybe, but given that Goodyear blimps are filled with helium there is no danger at all of them burning up.
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Old Apr 18, 2014, 01:51 PM
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but all in all hydrogen is scary in high school when you do this trick I think we had it under the hood and had a flame on the top of the neck of the beaker before the electrodes go in you want the gas to burn and not build up and go boom. plus those hoods are awesome. the sulfer iron experiment where you had to break the glass tube was one of my favorites. (all done under the hood)
The high school (and college chemistry) lab experiment involves igniting three gas mixstures: 100% oxygen, 100% hydrogen and a 50/50 mix of oxygen and hydrogen. Only the 50/50 mix burns in an instant. The other two just flame at the mouth for a few seconds until the gas is all consumed.
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