HobbyKing.com New Products Flash Sale
Reply
Thread Tools
Old Oct 20, 2012, 01:22 AM
www.steliosh.net/rcmoto/
steliosh's Avatar
Athens, Greece
Joined Oct 2003
3,303 Posts
Actually, when the kit rear tire's studs are gone, the tire gets a bit smaller in diameter, being practically slick... so you just add up the 1/8 buggy tire to... compensate... But even if it did get a bigger diameter, at least with my kit gearing and 4300kv motor, the bike still pulls wheelies at...will and doesn't seem to suffer in any way, like battery duration (I'm using 4000/30C hardcases exclusively, since they're the only ones to fit in there!) or speed, though I never bothered to measure it...I know for sure, that with the tire pictured in my post (a HotBodies med, I think) it finds grip even in damp/wet grass! So, it's still good fun!
steliosh is offline Find More Posts by steliosh
Reply With Quote
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Old Oct 20, 2012, 02:41 AM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2012
35 Posts
Agreed, the increase in diameter is minimal and the Badlands perform better on all surfaces than the standard tyre as well as looking better, the standard one looks a little smaller in comparison with the front IMO.

My first M5 was secondhand and came with a Badland fitted over the standard tyre (which had been worn almost bald) and spot glued in place, I wore that one down, replaced it but used glue all round this time to try and avoid getting moisture beetween the two tyres.

It worked very well, even allowing removal/reffiting to service the rear wheel/gyro etc, however when the second badland wore down it was difficult to remove the badland without damaging the standard tyre (but no moisture )

So I bought a standard tyre to wear down and recap, I'm still undecided what to try next but most 1/8th buggy tyres should fit. Loads of choice and cost effective too
Bonzodog690 is offline Find More Posts by Bonzodog690
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2012, 06:00 AM
Occasional useful idiot...
Joined Nov 2009
1,402 Posts
I'm just wondering about the standard tyre Vs the Badlands.

I've held off ordering a pair as they look too grippy on the side profile. The quickest way for me around the track around the switchbacks is to fly in there with full brake, lean it over as I slow and get the back end to slide to turn quicker. Also, on the larger hairpin loops, giving it full throttle and turning round the large loops speedway style helps me to keep up the gyro speed.

How have you found the performance of the bike with the Badlands?
Jonathan Bradbury is offline Find More Posts by Jonathan Bradbury
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2012, 08:41 AM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2012
35 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Bradbury View Post
I'm just wondering about the standard tyre Vs the Badlands.

I've held off ordering a pair as they look too grippy on the side profile. The quickest way for me around the track around the switchbacks is to fly in there with full brake, lean it over as I slow and get the back end to slide to turn quicker. Also, on the larger hairpin loops, giving it full throttle and turning round the large loops speedway style helps me to keep up the gyro speed.

How have you found the performance of the bike with the Badlands?
That sounds like most of my turning (off road at least), go in flat out, brake, slide and power out balancing throttle and steering to give the required exit (mostly ).

The side lugs on the Badlands allow for this, they're not that substantial and soon wear/break off anyhow, I've used them on all surfaces including wet and dry grass and have found them very predictable. They wear better than standard ones too. Give them a go I'd say.

They still look to have the best profile of the 1/8th buggy tyres I've looked at, and so most likely will be my next tyres again.
Bonzodog690 is offline Find More Posts by Bonzodog690
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 22, 2012, 05:10 PM
dammachines
United States, DC, Washington
Joined Feb 2004
1,388 Posts
The shipping might not make it worth it, but I have a new pair of Badlands tires that I've put up on Ebay about five times now - for something like $5 and no one wants them...

If anyone is interested.
Dave
dmincin is offline Find More Posts by dmincin
Reply With Quote
Old Oct 31, 2012, 11:09 PM
NaN
Andy2No's Avatar
Manchester, UK
Joined Nov 2005
3,782 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by steliosh View Post
Actually, when the kit rear tire's studs are gone, the tire gets a bit smaller in diameter, being practically slick... so you just add up the 1/8 buggy tire to... compensate
That makes sense. I hadn't thought of that.

I saw some 1/8 buggy tyres discounted in a model shop, but they were still pretty dear - about 10 GBP / $15 or so for two, I think. Probably cheap as such things go, but still quite a lot for a bit of moulded synthetic rubber. I'll have a closer look if they're still there next time I go.
Andy2No is online now Find More Posts by Andy2No
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 03, 2012, 10:50 AM
Occasional useful idiot...
Joined Nov 2009
1,402 Posts
A bit of good news.

The M5 race/DXR slipper clutch fits! Everything is where it should be, all the E clip grooves are present and correct. The spur gear is identical in size/pitch as the old one. The hardest bit of the swap over was dismantling the old assembly!

No pics as yet, technology breakdown
Jonathan Bradbury is offline Find More Posts by Jonathan Bradbury
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 17, 2012, 08:38 PM
Occasional useful idiot...
Joined Nov 2009
1,402 Posts
Whilst the pics are not brilliant (taken from an old phone I finally managed to get linked to the computer) proof the slipper clutch fits!

Hopefully the weather will be dry and I can play around and see the effects tomorrow.
Name: Pic_0426_049.jpg
Views: 107
Size: 27.3 KB
Description: Name: Pic_0426_050.jpg
Views: 99
Size: 25.5 KB
Description: Name: Pic_0426_051.jpg
Views: 112
Size: 24.1 KB
Description:
Jonathan Bradbury is offline Find More Posts by Jonathan Bradbury
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 20, 2012, 02:54 AM
Registered User
United Kingdom, England, Ware
Joined Aug 2012
169 Posts
A while back I posed the question as to why Anderson went to the extent of making the swing arm locating bearing holders eccentric and the assembly instructions are the install with the bearing in the higher position .
I stand to be corrected but I think this could be the answer
On a 1:1 motorcycle if one places a small spacer (6mm) between the top of the rear shock and the frame it has the effect of raising up the rear of the bike .
This uplift then results in the rake angle of steering head becoming more acute making the bike 'turn in' quicker
Just think of a Harley with the long front forks at a very slight angle giving a very relaxed ride compared to a full track bike were the forks close to vertical resulting in turning very quick but also twitchy
The Venom VMX 450 has provision of removable blocks that will have the same effect and they highlight the fact that the lowering or lifting the layshaft will change the steering response
The same will apply to the M5 so good reason to ensure that after reassembly make sure both holders are in the same position .
I have tried them in both positions and did not see any noticable change but this was on rough terrain so may make a change on a smoother surface

Cheers Jim
Jimob23 is offline Find More Posts by Jimob23
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 27, 2012, 12:27 PM
Registered User
United Kingdom, England, Ware
Joined Aug 2012
169 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Bradbury View Post
A bit of good news.

The M5 race/DXR slipper clutch fits! Everything is where it should be, all the E clip grooves are present and correct. The spur gear is identical in size/pitch as the old one. The hardest bit of the swap over was dismantling the old assembly!

No pics as yet, technology breakdown
With the spur gear being made from the same Delrin or similar material as the original have you had any problems with this gear breaking where it was recommended to change to the alternative steel unit ?
Jimob23 is offline Find More Posts by Jimob23
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 27, 2012, 12:46 PM
Occasional useful idiot...
Joined Nov 2009
1,402 Posts
The gear is plastic. I suspect the problems of the original spur were due to the layshaft/pin system and the moulding on the spur, causing a weak point.

I sadly have not had opportunity to test the slipper. Bad weather has curtailed all that The metal spur gear should be a direct fit into the slipper though looking at it, so even if the plastic spur splits, all should be good. Of course you could fit a nylon spur and things should work ok.

The best news I found was it was an easy and direct fit. Now you have the slipper to correct overpower from the motor, then combined with a decent wheelie bar should sort out any lift up wheelie from the bumps. The silvercan I still use wont lift the front end on it's own, but 5000kv+ will, so It's an easy and cheap upgrade to fine tune that last nth degree.
Jonathan Bradbury is offline Find More Posts by Jonathan Bradbury
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 27, 2012, 01:46 PM
RC Dirt Bike Action
JohnnyMc's Avatar
California central coast
Joined Feb 2010
1,780 Posts
I was looking at that slipper unit to maybe help reduce the failure rate of the owb as I had 2 go out on me within a short time span at the local track. No science behind it, just thought it might help. Other benefit was just having ability to control the wheel slip. Never made it as far as you JB. Working with the vmx now that it has an egyro which has turned my dx into a shelf queen until vmx gets sorted. Plus rider was trashed so I will probably invest in a hpi rider if I ever return to the bike in 2013.
JohnnyMc is offline Find More Posts by JohnnyMc
Reply With Quote
Old Nov 27, 2012, 05:10 PM
Occasional useful idiot...
Joined Nov 2009
1,402 Posts
I doubt a slipper will save the OWB,that will fail due to rpm or contaminants. I seem to remember Timmah reviving a failed owb using white spirit and an airline. but for a 5 part, it's not a bank buster to keep one or two in the spares bin.

As for the crappy rider, let duct tape be your saviour. He might not be pretty, but he's built like a certain brick outhouse in strength now. Walter Payton to William Perry in one easy move, and none of the weight gain! Apart from his feet, which I need to look at over the dark months to see how this area can be rethought, as he has been using the soles as scratchbars in the corners, and are of course now broke.
Jonathan Bradbury is offline Find More Posts by Jonathan Bradbury
Last edited by Jonathan Bradbury; Nov 27, 2012 at 05:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 09, 2012, 09:24 AM
Registered User
United Kingdom, England, Ware
Joined Aug 2012
169 Posts
There have been various posts regarding wheelie bars and it may be of interest to see what i have been playing around with for the M5
On page 256 in the VMX 450 thread Jonathan Bradley post an artical setting out the differance between a mudguard protector and a wheelie bar .
There are a few commercial versions available but all tend to be a bit weak and bend upwards taking out the mudguard .
I made up some simple blocks from 10mm x 10 mm alum bar and fitted them in place where the original plastic set up was .Using 4 mm piano wire bent up a simple U shape bar to protect the mudguard .Thee piano wire is so strong you can actually use it to pick up the bike at the rear and doesn't budge .
When using this I never managed to bend it at all .
As in Jonathan's artical he described what occurs when the front lifts too high and it looks good but the gyro looses speed so becomes unstable .
I made up some simple blocks from 12mm x 12 mm alum drilled to accept the
4mm piano wire and fixed them to the rear of the swing arm
Have bent up a range of U bars with differing downward bends that will restrict the front lifting at varying degrees .
Weather has not been favourable over the past weeks to get out and test the combinations but initial test have been very satisfactory
Any comments/suggestions good or bad appriciated

Cheers
Jimob23 is offline Find More Posts by Jimob23
Reply With Quote
Old Dec 09, 2012, 09:44 AM
Occasional useful idiot...
Joined Nov 2009
1,402 Posts
Aahhh!, Now I see where you are going with the lower wheelie bar!

Bloody good idea that!

I'll be interested in how well it works, it'll be mid Jan for me as I am ordering some stability, and I've already blagged some truggy foam inserts to start exploring that front too. As well as thinking about the front brake and big bore damper conversion. I'm toying with the idea of twin shock

As an edit.Maybe the low bar would be better mounted below the swing arm. It lowers CofG, it presents a 'flatter' profile on the wheelie bar/surface interface so helping stop 'snatch and daggering' on the surface too.
Jonathan Bradbury is offline Find More Posts by Jonathan Bradbury
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools