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Old Jun 12, 2016, 06:37 PM
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Question
Phoenix Models Plywood ? What is it ?

Does anyone know what the plywood phoenix models uses in it's .40 - .60 airplanes ? It seems medium lightweight and very strong.
I haven't seen it for sale anywhere.
I am referring to what looks to be 2mm 3 ply.
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Old Jun 13, 2016, 07:15 AM
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You could contact Phoenix and ask them.
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Old Jun 13, 2016, 07:50 AM
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I sort of gave up on that, some foreign companies can't communicate well. I'll try.
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Old Jun 13, 2016, 09:35 AM
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There is a very nice material called Liteply that is considerably lighter and usually better quality to the usual Birch ply.

My experience of ARF models is that they use something similar but of poorer quality, probably cost related.

I think I remember Liteply was originally use for wooden jigsaw puzzles. Good model shops should stock it. Or try a search on Liteply, but you may find it expensive compared to the cheaper Birch ply.

Balsa ply is quite simple to make, just reverse the grain direction between sheets, use the minimum of glue.

Ray.
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Old Jun 13, 2016, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eflightray View Post
There is a very nice material called Liteply that is considerably lighter and usually better quality to the usual Birch ply.

My experience of ARF models is that they use something similar but of poorer quality, probably cost related.

I think I remember Liteply was originally use for wooden jigsaw puzzles. Good model shops should stock it. Or try a search on Liteply, but you may find it expensive compared to the cheaper Birch ply.

Balsa ply is quite simple to make, just reverse the grain direction between sheets, use the minimum of glue.

Ray.



Ditto but if your laminating plys of balsa you may want to make sure your using a waterproof adhesive .. especially if your in a wet - temperate climate, building a waterplane/float plane or just going keep the model for any length of time.. waters the universal solvent given time..

higher quality plys tend to use more thin layers of an even thickness - usually an odd number 3,5,7,9, so the two facing outer's have the grain running in the same direction , cheaper ones tend to use a sandwich of thin and thicker layers.. they tend to hide splits gaps and weaknesses in the thicker layers... not nice.
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Old Jun 13, 2016, 11:49 AM
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That stuff Phoenix uses looks like a hard balsa ply, one hard layer on each side and a soft balsa inside. I think it may be some native Viet Nam wood. I'll contact them later.
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Old Jun 27, 2016, 03:40 AM
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My guess:

Itīs a wood called Ceiba (Other name is Gabun)

As poplar wood is seldom there

Toby
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Old Jun 27, 2016, 06:59 AM
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Description says that is what it is.

Sapwood and heartwood are not clearly demarcated. The wood is whitish, pale brown, or pinkish brown, often with yellowish or grayish streaks. The texture is coarse, and the grain is interlocked or occasionally irregular. Ceiba is very soft and light; density of air-dried wood is 320 kg/m3 (20 lb/ft3). In strength, the wood is comparable with basswood (Tilia americana). Ceiba dries rapidly without marked deterioration. It is difficult to saw cleanly and dress smoothly because of the high percentage of tension wood. It provides good veneer and is easy to nail and glue. Ceiba is very susceptible to attack by decay fungi and insects. It requires rapid harvest and conversion to prevent deterioration. Treatability, however, is rated as good.


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Old Jun 27, 2016, 01:23 PM
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For sure it's a tropic wood, may be Ceiba, but I don't know its origin. Due to my experience, as many tropic wood is growing fast, the one used for Phoenix ARF models IMHO is not really comparable to the quality of Birch or Beech Plywood as I can state after some undocumented tests I did myself. But not only the wood properties themself but the less number of layers within one peace of such ply is relevant for its characteristics.

So called "Liteply" or anything not indicating its wooden origin due to my knowledge and suggestion is a marketing name for whatever distributors subsumize concnerning such kind of plywood. Beside balsa ply I know "abele" / "poplar" or so called "cotton wood" as kind of lighter but less quality plywood compared to the high quality birch or beech ply. Self made balsa ply is a very interesting idea for certain parts of a plane, like e.g. former for the fuselage that are not so far under hard terms in use of the model. The "abele" / "poplar" or so called "cotton wood" I use for any further a bit stiffer parts like some former, central ribs a.s.o. For keeping e.g. the landing gear or the airfoil joint / inner ribs I prefer high quality birch / beech ply. That's what I can state after 3 decades experience with building up wooden airplane models including large scale soaring planes (up to 275" wingspan).

Hope this may help you, good Guys.
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Old Jun 27, 2016, 02:30 PM
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That stuff in the Phoenix Models is very strong. I did a test on a crashed fuselage, I swung the thing like a ball bat against concrete and it took 3 or four hard swings to break it. I suppose the only weak part is as usual, the landing gear and tail section, but those were more than good enough.
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