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Old Sep 27, 2014, 03:37 PM
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Something I didn't think was done in 1:1

I thought the free flight guys would like to see this.
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Old Sep 27, 2014, 03:39 PM
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It's on a replica of a Nieuport 28.
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Old Sep 27, 2014, 07:25 PM
I eat glue
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That's done a lot on some full size aircraft, especially those without cockpit adjustable trim tabs.
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Old Sep 28, 2014, 04:40 AM
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Would it be too troublesome to re-string the control cables to incorporate that trim change? The tab doesn't look very pretty.
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Old Sep 28, 2014, 11:20 AM
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If One were to "re-string" the control cables, all it would do is change the stick position in the cockpit. The trim tab was added to relieve some of the control pressures on the pilot's hand, and arm.

However, One [I]could[I] shim the horizontal stab to perform the same task.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trisquire View Post
Would it be too troublesome to re-string the control cables to incorporate that trim change? The tab doesn't look very pretty.
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Old Sep 28, 2014, 06:16 PM
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Actually, it's done all the time 1:1.
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Old Sep 28, 2014, 07:00 PM
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Hers one on a Hurricane, this is in addition to a Trim Tab.
Does than make this a boost tab?
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Old Sep 28, 2014, 10:38 PM
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Might Google "trim tab", "adjustable trim tab", "servo tab", "anti-servo tab", "spring tab" and "balance tab". Boost tab is sometimes used to describe a direct mechanically connected servo tab, which aids in moving the surface in the desired direction. In 1920'-30's large British aircraft oft had servo tabs connected directly to the pilot's controls, which moved the larger, unconnected, surfaces to control the aircraft.

The Hurricane appears to have a "fixed, ground adjustable trim tab" next to the adjustable elevator trim tab. IIRC, there is a pair on the opposite elevator as well.
Mustangs (P-51B/C/D/K) with Dorsal Fin Fillet, have had anti-boost or anti-servo function added to the rudder trim system. This increased the force required to move the rudder, but trim was still adjustable. IIRC, F4-U's have elevator boost AND balance tabs!!?? That simple tab can have some complex iterations!
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Old Sep 29, 2014, 12:34 AM
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So what would they have done with that Nieuport back in WWI? The pilot would have just dealt with uneven control pressures? I thought the purpose of a trim tab was to put the stick's neutral position where it should be - at neutral.
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Old Sep 29, 2014, 03:32 AM
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Back in the day instead of attaching a tab, a length of cord would be doped along the trailing edge, the length varied according to the amount of trim required, the cord was usually covered with a piece of fabric doped over to hold it in place.
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Old Sep 29, 2014, 09:06 AM
Balsadustus Producerus
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Kiwi--we did that to our Travelair 4000 biplanes at a flightseeing company I flew for. Both required more trim travel than was available (always had to hold a little forward stick), so a 3/8" triangular strip was taped onto the elevator trailing edge, adjusted in length and flown until it flew level with the trim centered in neutral. Each required a different-length strip. Once we had it where we needed it, the strip was glued down with fabric cement and some 3" surface tape was applied, then doped to match. That way, the limited amount of trim travel available could be used, and the airplane flew level.

For what it's worth, Travelair biplanes had a trimmable tail, not a trim tab.
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Old Sep 29, 2014, 10:51 AM
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Pitts S1 photographed in the summer of 2012. The owner said he and previous owner(s) have gone for simplicity and keeping the weight down, instead of adding power and weight for performance.

The aircraft was 40 years old then, and had recently been through a thorough overhaul.
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Old Sep 29, 2014, 04:36 PM
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Not sure of the specific rigging limits possible on Nieuport 28, however most WWI types could be fine tuned in stagger, wing incidence, to adjust for fore and aft trim, wing heaviness etc.

Same can often be accomplished, within reason, with a trim tab on a convenient/proper surface.

When I was kid (1960's), my father owned a Travel Air 4000, with trim tab in one elevator. It had been a "rice seeder", in a previous incarnation.
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Old Sep 30, 2014, 06:30 PM
I eat glue
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A lot of the early aircraft were ground trimmed or tuned for level flight at a normal cruise throttle setting. Any changes in throttle change meant that they either had to hold back or push forward on the stick.
The RCAF Snow Birds fly with the trims set so that they have to constantly pull back on the stick.
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Old Oct 09, 2014, 02:06 AM
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You can see one tab and a little bit of another on the Facetmobile:
http://www.mfhb.org.nz/joomla/images.../Facet%202.jpg
Barnaby Wainfan, its designer, said that until they added up tabs and a down bungee, the control forces were reversed. Not something that showed up when testing the RC model.
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