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Old Oct 21, 2013, 05:22 PM
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circuitfxr's Avatar
United States, FL, Wildwood
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Refurbish of a Northwind 36-600

Hi all. I recently traded an rc plane for a Northwind 36. I am completely new to sailboats so please bear with me. My terminology may be wrong and I will have a lot of questions.
She came to me somewhat built. The rigging was in place at one time and all the hull hardware has been installed. I do not think she has ever seen water because the keel tube and rudder tube have NOT been glued. They are just "in place". Many of the "stanchions"???? were broken away from the hull with the rigging string attached. The bottom of the hull and the rudder have been painted in what looks like a metallic black. The keel and ballast bulb are unpainted with filler.
The sails have been taped and rigged. The mast has all the hardware installed.
The sails are little stained. The servo tray is assembled, but installed.
The entire deck was filthy and the person who glued the parts on the hull was very "heavy handed" with the glue and somewhat sloppy as well.
The "before" or starting pictures are below.
I built the stand this morning and have done some repairing and cleaning. More on that with the next post.
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Old Oct 21, 2013, 06:28 PM
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Here is the stand I built using craft foam board. It works quite well and is completely water proof. The pictures will walk you through the build process.
I also cleaned the deck, untangled the rigging lines on the mast, and fixed all the broken stanchions.
Starting to look like a sailboat. Have a LOT more to do. Any suggestions?
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Old Oct 21, 2013, 11:18 PM
Taking care of the pond.
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Looking good.
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Old Oct 22, 2013, 02:30 AM
Kimo
United States, HI, Honolulu
Joined Jun 2011
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It doesn't look like you will have any trouble getting ready for the water as it looks great right now. As you found out a stand isn't that hard to make, I found a good deal on some 1/4x1/4" redwood trim molding that I cut to size then used brass screws to mount the cross braces then used ss bolts and nuts with ss washers to put the two sides together. After a couple coats of varnish they were ready to use.
Look forward to seeing more pictures as you move toward the finish boat.
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Old Oct 22, 2013, 03:22 AM
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Thanks for the encouragement. I am completely new to sailing so I am learning a lot. I have sorted and attached the rigging lines on the mast. I used the photos on the box for a guide since the instructions are just confusing. I still have to figure out how the servo tray mounts and do something with the sails. I saw a video on YouTube on how to make replacement sails with trash bags. I don't know if that is a good material or not. The cost of new sails is ridiculous. I don't want to race her, just play around at the local pond. Does anyone know if the trash bag idea will work? Perhaps someone could give a suggestion on how to remove the staining from the original sails?
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Old Oct 22, 2013, 04:13 AM
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Poly trash bags are good if you are trying to figure out a shape that works, then use the best as a pattern. Drafting film (mylar) is much better, but you really do need to know the exact shape you want first go, it doesn't take many second tries to find out that ready made prices are not as outlandish as you first thought.
Mylar sails do not like being folded or rolled. Poly cotton is good for rough storage, ripstop kite material works well, but again, is only economical if you get it right early.
Staining - depends on the stain and material. Maybe a creative look around the household cleaning department next shopping trip?
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Old Oct 22, 2013, 09:21 AM
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A quick note on your stand--it would be a good idea to either lower the stand or to add a strap to support the keel. Leaving the keel unsupported over time will cause the hull to distort or fracture. Most boat stands are shorter so that the keel rests on the ground and the stand is less likely to tip over when holding a rigged boat outside in the wind...
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Old Oct 22, 2013, 01:20 PM
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Thank you gentleman. All great suggestions and I am going to make the proper changes. I didn't even think about the weight of the keel misshaping the hull. It makes sense though. I am going to try and save the original sails and just clean them the best I can.
Do any of you know what material the original sails are made of? It feels a bit like thin plastic. I don't want to use a cleaner that will destroy the material or make the staining worse.
I have worked a bit with the rigging on the mast. Pictures below. I think I got it right. I don't understand the purpose of rigging that only attaches the mast to the hull. Seems it should attach to the sails. Do these just keep the mast straight?
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Old Oct 22, 2013, 05:07 PM
Kimo
United States, HI, Honolulu
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I'm no expert but the I understand that the wire (standing rigging) help support the mast in a upright position and stops the mast from bending to much under wind loads. But I'm sure that you will get a better answer from someone here.
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Old Oct 23, 2013, 01:09 AM
Po' boys does w/ Po'boys ways
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Well done glue clean-up n rpairs my friend!!!..Tm....P.S. is the stand made of same foam as Remora parts??? DANG that stuff is strong !!.. it is not like what I been useing!!Ha-Ha
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Last edited by haxawsnavy; Oct 23, 2013 at 01:13 AM. Reason: added P.S./ concerning stand
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Old Oct 23, 2013, 04:20 AM
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Quote:
Do these just keep the mast straight?
A very important consideration. The value will become apparent when you carry the rigged boat in a breeze and get some idea of how much horsepower is generated.
With a deck stepped mast (on the deck or a shallow socket) the side rigging keeps the mast vertical against side winds. The force generated by the wind is transmitted to the hull by these lines. These forces are then passed via the hull structure to the fin, magic happens and the boat goes. The backstay stops the mast falling forward with a following wind, the forestay (which might well be part of the foresail) stops it collapsing backward when tacking across the wind.
Keeping the mast the right shape helps with keeping the sails the right shape to get the best from the available wind. This applies to both deck and keel stepped masts. There is a long and interesting learning curve ahead. Enjoyable all the way, though.
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Old Oct 23, 2013, 08:37 AM
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Thank you Mfr02. Everything you said makes perfect sense. There is a bit of a learning curve, but I am excited to learn. This simple and elegant method of propulsion has always fascinated me. I was rather curious about why the mast did not penetrate the deck and be secured to the inner hull. Now I understand.
I can see how the physics of leverage would cause excessive and destructive forces to be applied to the mast base. This, in turn, would allow the mast to be unsupported and the entire sail superstructure would collapse.
My eyes are beginning to open!

In other news, I have replaced the "frozen" sail servo with a nice, high torque, ball bearing servo. Both servos now move properly. Next step will be to strengthen and mount the radio tray in the hull.
I have painted the keel and bulb as well. I just made then a basic gloss black.
I am not going to try and match the metallic black finish on the rudder.
The new servo is rated at 50 oz/in. I am hoping that will be enough. The old one was only 9 0z/in (No wonder it failed) The old one had plastic gears that stripped and the motor was NOT sealed. The gears stripped and the motor corroded tight.

I am learning and doing the best I can with what I have. Hopefully she will be sea worthy in time for the holidays. Comments and suggestions are always welcome.
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Old Oct 23, 2013, 08:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haxawsnavy View Post
Well done glue clean-up n rpairs my friend!!!..Tm....P.S. is the stand made of same foam as Remora parts??? DANG that stuff is strong !!.. it is not like what I been useing!!Ha-Ha
Yes Tim. The stand is made from the same stuff as your kit. II have doubled it for extra strength. It is doing quite well and is plenty strong. Just have to paint it to make it look pretty.
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Old Oct 23, 2013, 06:22 PM
Boomer1
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My friend from Honolulu is correct. The shrouds are there to hold up the mast - the backstay also provides support and is used to adjust the mast angle. The forestay also provides some support to the mast.

Keep in mind the shroud lines should be "taught" not banjo string tight! The line you are using appears in the pictures to be a heavier gauge - not a big deal - just saying they look a little fuzz.

Basic sails are not that hard to make. One of the more popular fabrics used is "Ripstop". You can get some good fabrics for sails at a kite shop. There a number to "how to" make sails threads here on this forum. You can use the search feature to locate them.

Regarding your sail servo I think 50 oz. is pretty light for a 36" sailboat. I'd suggest something more in the 140 oz. + range would be more in keeping with the boat's size. I have a number of 32 and 36" boats and I use servos rated as close to 200 oz. (6V) as possible. At the bear min. look at HS-645MG it is a very popular sail servo at 133 oz. on 6volts. they sell for about $35.00
I posted a few pictures of higher torque servo's you can look up and to check out. Good way to learn to use the servo data base too.

Here are two very good links to research servos:http://www.servocity.com/
http://www.servodatabase.com/

I would think someone here has one of these boats and they could suggest a properly sized servo for you. (Beyond my suggestion)

The boat looks good and it is providing you with a great learning opportunity!

Boomer
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Old Oct 23, 2013, 09:53 PM
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Thanks Boomer. You gave me a lot to consider. I think I will hold off on making new sails right now. The old sails will be fine for learning the ropes. Is there any advantage to the servo by using the "stepped remote arm system"? Perhaps a lighter duty servo could generate more pulling power using the levering system? A lot of sail boats I have seen have had the sail winch attached directly to the servo. I could see where that would require a very sturdy, high torque servo, but what purpose could the multiple linked, multi-arm system possibly have? Seems this system has built in "failure points". Am I totally wrong in this assumption?
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