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Old Jul 26, 2012, 09:15 AM
PGR
Low AltiDude
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United States, CA, Costa Mesa
Joined Jun 2004
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An after-the-fact "DOH!" moment

I killed a plane last Sunday. It was my Multiplex Funjet which is my only powered bank-&-yank plane and easily replaced, and all the gear survived without damage so I'm not exactly upset about the loss.

But I still wish it hadn't happened.

No, it wasn't equipment failure: I simply forgot to switch models in my TX before I hucked it and the plane was already going at a pretty good clip before I realized the ailerons and elevator were reversed. I actually got it somewhat slowed down and under control, but I lost it turning base leg and the poor little thing did it's best to leave a lasting impression on mother earth.

Anyway, this got me thinking about some advantages to using XPS receivers that I'm not taking advantage of: Because we can assign any function to any channel and reverse throws in the RX instead of the TX there's no reason why flying a plane with the wrong setup has to be so uncontrollable.

Actually, most of my planes already are set up similarly by virtue of common servo placement, but the exceptions are my elevon planes and some legacy aircraft that I built before I had "standards" and converted from 72MHz to XPS. FWIW my Funjet was one of those legacy planes.

The bottom line is I'm now in the process of changing the programming in all the oddball planes' receivers (XPS Nanos) so they all share the same basic control setup. That way if I ever make the same mistake again at least I won't have any reversed controls. Trim might be off and end points and rates might be all screwed up, but at least the plane will respond in a conventional way to stick input.

I've been flying XPS for several years now and purchased an XDP with the very first TX module and receivers, so it pains me that I didn't think of this sooner.

As Homer Simpson would say: "DOH!"

Pete
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Old Jul 26, 2012, 06:17 PM
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E_ferret's Avatar
Launceston Arpt, Tasmania, Australia
Joined Jan 2004
564 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by PGR View Post
I killed a plane last Sunday. It was my Multiplex Funjet which is my only powered bank-&-yank plane and easily replaced, and all the gear survived without damage so I'm not exactly upset about the loss.

But I still wish it hadn't happened.

No, it wasn't equipment failure: I simply forgot to switch models in my TX before I hucked it and the plane was already going at a pretty good clip before I realized the ailerons and elevator were reversed. I actually got it somewhat slowed down and under control, but I lost it turning base leg and the poor little thing did it's best to leave a lasting impression on mother earth.

Anyway, this got me thinking about some advantages to using XPS receivers that I'm not taking advantage of: Because we can assign any function to any channel and reverse throws in the RX instead of the TX there's no reason why flying a plane with the wrong setup has to be so uncontrollable.

Actually, most of my planes already are set up similarly by virtue of common servo placement, but the exceptions are my elevon planes and some legacy aircraft that I built before I had "standards" and converted from 72MHz to XPS. FWIW my Funjet was one of those legacy planes.

The bottom line is I'm now in the process of changing the programming in all the oddball planes' receivers (XPS Nanos) so they all share the same basic control setup. That way if I ever make the same mistake again at least I won't have any reversed controls. Trim might be off and end points and rates might be all screwed up, but at least the plane will respond in a conventional way to stick input.

I've been flying XPS for several years now and purchased an XDP with the very first TX module and receivers, so it pains me that I didn't think of this sooner.

As Homer Simpson would say: "DOH!"

Pete
a tip for "next time"; hold your transmitter upside down and fly it in without a single problem. You just have to have lightning speed realization capabilities.
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Old Jul 27, 2012, 10:29 AM
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Tennessee
Joined Sep 2003
2,335 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by PGR View Post
IThe bottom line is I'm now in the process of changing the programming in all the oddball planes' receivers (XPS Nanos) so they all share the same basic control setup. That way if I ever make the same mistake again at least I won't have any reversed controls. Trim might be off and end points and rates might be all screwed up, but at least the plane will respond in a conventional way to stick input.

I've been flying XPS for several years now and purchased an XDP with the very first TX module and receivers, so it pains me that I didn't think of this sooner.

As Homer Simpson would say: "DOH!"

Pete
Like most of us, you learned this lesson the hard way. For the last 30 years, I have not been troubled by selecting the wrong model EXCEPT for my V-tail models and I gave up on them years ago. I never had this problem before we started getting reversing switches and programmable transmitters. This is progress ???? Anyway, no matter which model I have selectet, the contros will ALWAYS move the right direction. The model may be out of trim but should be flyable enough to have a chance of getting it down in one piece.
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Old Jul 31, 2012, 10:40 PM
Xtreme Power Systems
Lake Havasu, AZ
Joined Jun 2005
15,882 Posts
I always setup every model with the exact same throttle, rudder, elevator, and aileron direction. This way, the model could be the wrong one (except perhaps a helicopter or quad model) and I can still fly the airplane.

I also try to setup the brakes and retracts the same for every model as well... there is nothing worse than changing your model and have the gear collapse!
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Old Aug 01, 2012, 01:47 AM
Registered User
Tennessee
Joined Sep 2003
2,335 Posts
I even set up my sailplanes the same as my power models. I also do not define them as elevator, rudder, aileron, or throttle. I define them as pitch, yaw, roll, and speed. When flying sailplanes, the throttle stick controls spoilers or crow and spoilers or crow is deployed when I pull the stick back. For models without ailerons, rudder is controlled with the stick normally used for ailerons.
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