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Old Jul 25, 2007, 10:40 PM
bill kolofa
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n/a Posts
Don't lose your plane!

I lost my second plane in the weeds this year. Last year I last a Zagi -
never found it.
This year a 2 meter EP glider. I told myself that I needed to put a plane
finder alarm in it but failed to do it in my haste to get it in the air. If
you fly in an area with tall weeds or corn, consider adding a plane finder
alert beeper. I fly in areas surrounded by tall weeds and somewhat swampy
with tall "cat tails". Who would have thought that the weeds could swallow a
2 meter glider?
Never again, I say!
Bill


Old Jul 26, 2007, 12:56 AM
Morgans
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Don't lose your plane!


"bill kolofa" > wrote

> I fly in areas surrounded by tall weeds and somewhat swampy
> with tall "cat tails". Who would have thought that the weeds could swallow a
> 2 meter glider?


You need to get one of those 100 buck or less wireless TV cameras from
somewhere, and put it into a plane, and then go on a spy mission. It would be
paid for with one find, and you could find other people's planes, too.

Plus, it would be fun !
--
Jim in NC

Old Jul 26, 2007, 11:52 AM
Doug McLaren
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Don't lose your plane!

In article <jy0qi.3$ZH5.0@newsfe12.lga>,
Morgans <jsmorgan@charterJUNK.net> wrote:

| "bill kolofa" > wrote
|
| > I fly in areas surrounded by tall weeds and somewhat swampy
| > with tall "cat tails". Who would have thought that the weeds could swallow a
| > 2 meter glider?
|
| You need to get one of those 100 buck or less wireless TV cameras from
| somewhere, and put it into a plane, and then go on a spy mission.

You make it sound easy. In practice, it's not so easy. At the very
least, make sure you have somebody else there to watch the TV screen
so you can fly your plane, lest you find yourself looking for *two*
lost planes.

| Plus, it would be fun !

There is that.

Though really, Bill's advice to use a lost plane alarm around places
like this is good advice. They're cheap and light and help
tremendously. As an added bonus, most will also warn you when your
battery goes low -- which isn't so important for electric planes, but
for gliders or glow planes, it's very nice.

This is what I use --

http://www.towerhobbies.com/products.../hcap0335.html

and I tend to build it into my slope planes, since they're the ones
most likely to get lost. If you can make a hole for the speaker to
get outside it'll be much louder, but it's not essential.

It's amazing how easy it is to lose a plane in a bunch of trees, and
get 10 feet away from it and still never realize it's there.

--
Doug McLaren, dougmc@frenzied.us
Knowledge is Power
Power Corrupts
Study Hard, Be Evil
Old Jul 26, 2007, 04:15 PM
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Don't lose your plane!

On 26 Jul 2007 15:52:59 GMT, "Doug McLaren" <dougmc+usenet-20070726@frenzied.us> wrote in <1185464725.4552@frenzied.us>:

> ... It's amazing how easy it is to lose a plane in a bunch of trees, and
>get 10 feet away from it and still never realize it's there.


I love searching for OTHER FOLKS' downed birds.

I've helped to find a few.

The best find was three days after it got lost.
I wasn't there when it happened, but someone pointed
to where they thought they had seen it last.

I took a compass and forced myself to walk a grid
through the forest.

The compass eventually said "Go through that thicket."
I didn't want to do it. There were paths around that
particular piece of brush. But that's where the plane
was--and I didn't see it until I was right next to it
and just about ready to step past it.

Nose down in a thicket or in a stand of grass presents
virtually no image to an eye in the sky--just the
trailing edge of the empennage and wing and perhaps
a small glimpse of part of the fuse.

When your plane is going down and all hope is lost,
point your antenna at it as it disappears into the
woods. Carefully mark the line for future reference.
You may, for a moment, lay your TX on the ground while
you find other things to act as your pointers. Then
take the TX with you into the woods and periodically
wiggle the sticks while you search. You may get lucky
and hear the servos moving.

No harm in trying--other than the awkwardness of wading
through swamps while wiggling the sticks.

Marty
--
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Old Jul 26, 2007, 09:21 PM
Morgans
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Don't lose your plane!


"Doug McLaren" > wrote

> At the very
> least, make sure you have somebody else there to watch the TV screen
> so you can fly your plane, lest you find yourself looking for *two*
> lost planes.


Agreed! <g> I didn't say that, but I should have.

> Though really, Bill's advice to use a lost plane alarm around places
> like this is good advice.


Yep. A place like that can eat a plane, given a chance.

I was flying at a Myrtle Beach club, while I was on vacation, as a guest. I was
still relatively inexperienced, and was shooting touch and go's.

There was a raised area at one end of the runway. I got a little too low, due
to illusion, (I blew the distance judging) and right almost at the runway, my
plane dissappeared behind the hill. I thought "oh sh*t, there goes a big
repair", and had lowered my transmitter, getting ready to go for a walk and find
my plane.

Suddenly, my plane reappeared, and was still "kinda' flying." I got my
transmitter back up, throttled up, and went around. I ended landing OK, after
the next circle around the pattern. Landing gear was a little bent, but
otherwise OK.

Turns out that that hill was a dike with an access road on it. The dike was
holding the sludge pond, or settling pond for the sewage treatment plant.

How close is that to being in "deep sh*t?" <g>

> It's amazing how easy it is to lose a plane in a bunch of trees, and
> get 10 feet away from it and still never realize it's there.


Yep, and corn fields are pretty bad for eating planes, too. (DAMHIKT) At least
you can walk up and down every row and have a pretty good chance to find it!
--
Jim in NC

Old Jul 26, 2007, 09:45 PM
David Hopper
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Don't lose your plane!

On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 16:15:08 -0400, "Martin X. Moleski, SJ"
<moleski@canisius.edu> wrote:

>
>When your plane is going down and all hope is lost,
>point your antenna at it as it disappears into the
>woods. Carefully mark the line for future reference.
>You may, for a moment, lay your TX on the ground while
>you find other things to act as your pointers. Then
>take the TX with you into the woods and periodically
>wiggle the sticks while you search. You may get lucky
>and hear the servos moving.
>
>No harm in trying--other than the awkwardness of wading
>through swamps while wiggling the sticks.
>


Lost plane story..

I was down at one of Mac Hodges' fly-ins and had my ol' spad (I called
it my plastic plane) in the air having a ball. I had it in a flat spin
when the engine quit and it went down in the woods across the way.
Three of us went out looking for it, but no luck. Checked the tall
stand of pines and a briar thicket where we were absolutely sure it
went it. There was an old deer stand by the thicket so we even crawled
up on it for a better view. Nothing, and darkness was approaching so
we had to call it quits. I thought about the wiggling the transmitter
stick idea, but only after we were walking out.

I had to go home that evening empty handed, and it bugged me mainly
for losing the ham band receiver in it. I decided to drive back the
next morning (another hour and a half one way) and give it another try
in new light. Searched for awhile without luck and climbed back up in
the deer stand again but still didn't see it. Then, for some reason, I
looked straight up. Yep, about 10 feet directly overhead, there it was
- wing in one limb and fuse in another. I found a stick, knocked the
parts down and headed back. It wasn't hurt - hey, it's a spad! On the
way home I charged it up and flew it later that day at our field.

Sweet!

David
AMA 804532
Old Jul 26, 2007, 10:17 PM
Morgans
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Don't lose your plane!


"Morgans"> wrote

> Turns out that that hill was a dike with an access road on it. The dike was
> holding the sludge pond, or settling pond for the sewage treatment plant.


What I didn't add to complete this story, was that it bounced off the side of
the dike, and the bounce threw it back up where I could see it again.
--
Jim in NC

Old Jul 26, 2007, 11:08 PM
Martin X. Moleski, SJ
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: Don't lose your plane!

On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 21:45:22 -0400, David Hopper <nospam0879@bellsouth.net> wrote in
<edjia311c3bkmb18h4qp4ikr9fbcacrkj5@4ax.com>:

> ... for some reason, I
>looked straight up. Yep, about 10 feet directly overhead, there it was
>- wing in one limb and fuse in another. I found a stick, knocked the
>parts down and headed back. It wasn't hurt - hey, it's a spad! On the
>way home I charged it up and flew it later that day at our field.


>Sweet!


Way to go!

What a great feeling, eh?

Marty
--
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