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Old Jan 20, 2007, 09:06 PM
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Microbatman's Avatar
United States, TX, Argyle
Joined Jan 2005
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QUALITY servo DIY extensions extendors wires

I just tried making a custom length servo extension.


Using these

http://www.bphobbies.com/view.asp?id...18&pid=V657932


Only to find out the connection was terrible.

It was too loose to trust and barley gripped when plugged into the reciever.

I am looking for a MALE plug (inside has female pins) solution that is reliable and will work

I have made three of these using these parts and non of them had any quality to trust.

What I am doing wrong?
Do I need a special crimping tool?
Do I need better quality pins?

If I give up,
Is there any source that makes custom length to order servo extendor wires?
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Old Jan 21, 2007, 12:31 AM
Studies the wind
ghoti's Avatar
United States, CA, Yountville
Joined Nov 2004
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I buy extention cords that are too long and cut them down. You end up with 3 soldered lap splices, staggered so they don't overlap. They are insulated with three small lengths of shrink tube. Works fine for me but requires skillful soldering. Bill
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Old Jan 21, 2007, 01:14 AM
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rockom's Avatar
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I never has any issues before I got a crimp tool. I used pliers and bent the little tabs by hand. When finished I put a tiny drop of solder. Using the crimp tool, I still put a very small amount of solder to help ensure the wire won't pull out.

-Rocko
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Old Jan 21, 2007, 03:23 AM
supreme being of leisure
ZAGNUT's Avatar
Tel Aviv, Israel
Joined Jul 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Microbatman

I am looking for a MALE plug (inside has female pins) solution that is reliable and will work
no, you're looking for FEMALE plugs if you want FEMALE sockets inside. the pins on the receiver are MALE. for some stupid reason people in our hobby like to assign the sex of a connector based on the housing or shroud instead of the actual pins/sockets. learn to use the right terms and your search will be much easier when looking outside the standard hobby suppliers.


dave
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Old Jan 21, 2007, 03:40 AM
supreme being of leisure
ZAGNUT's Avatar
Tel Aviv, Israel
Joined Jul 2004
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and to be on topic: go browse the digikey catalog for 2.54mm connectors.

check the current ratings, cycle life and contact length to find something that suits you. for my servo leads i actually prefer connectors with solder tails and not crimps. after soldering i use a good flexible shrink tube on the connections. if the pin spacing on the reciever i'm using allows i also put a large shrink tube over all the connections and the plastic housing, and while srinking it fill the area around the wires with hot melt glue.



dave
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Old Jan 21, 2007, 10:13 PM
The reviewer
XJet's Avatar
Tokoroa
Joined Mar 2004
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightz
I never has any issues before I got a crimp tool. I used pliers and bent the little tabs by hand. When finished I put a tiny drop of solder. Using the crimp tool, I still put a very small amount of solder to help ensure the wire won't pull out.
-Rocko
Nooooo!

Don't solder those connections, they will fail early if you do.

I never believed that a *properly* crimped connection was better than a well soldered one until I did the research myself.

But (and the FAA agrees), a properly crimped connection is superior to a soldered one in almost every way.

It's stronger, electrically more conductive, less susceptible to vibration (a *big* point in nitro/gas-powered models) and more reliable.

By adding solder to a crimped connection you are significantly reducing its reliability and performance.

It's worth noting that the housings used in our RC connectors are *not* designed for soldered connections either and don't provide the level of support necessary to promote vibration resistance -- this can only be done through the use of a proper crimping tool and technique.

It's really not worth risking a model for the sake of a few dollars.
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Old Jan 21, 2007, 11:09 PM
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Baulkham Hills
Joined Apr 2005
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Ditto what XJET says.
A poorly constructed crimp tool is a total waste of time, but shouldn't be used to disregard all crimp connections. A good crimping tool costs big $, but they work well giving reliable results. A crimp done properly will give years of reilable connection. One reason crimps are favoured is the fact that tehy are generall chemical free. No flux wicks up into the core
Good luck
Matt
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 12:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XJet
electrically more conductive

I would need to see tests on that one, but the rest I would agree with. One reason the FAA might like crimped connections is that if the wire/connector over heats, then you won't get the wire pulling out of the connector when the solder melts. Also by not soldering, how much weight will be saved in a full size aircaft?
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 02:44 AM
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Tokoroa
Joined Mar 2004
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They are more conductive because solder (which is an alloy of tin and lead) has a lower conductivity than either the wire or the connector itself. When you solder a connector, you're introducing the resistance of the solder to the circuit. Crimp it properly and you have a direct gas-tight cold-weld between the wire and the connector = no solder to impede the flow of electricity.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 08:44 AM
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USA, IL, Malta
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Conductivity, flux, temp, impedance, ect.....hardly an issue on my RC model.
It certainly is no worse than the other end of the wire thats SOLDERED to my ESC or servo PCB.

My opinion anyway.

-Rocko
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 08:55 AM
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I don't want to drag this out but again I would need to see proof. By that theory crimping tinned copper to gold connectors would be really bad, or even bare copper to gold.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 09:29 AM
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East Anglia, UK
Joined Sep 2002
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All I ever do is cut the servo leads and solder a bit of three core ribbon to each end.

Lighter than anything else.
More relaible than anything else provided each joint is braced with heatshrink.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 10:18 AM
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United Kingdom, Oxford
Joined Feb 2003
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Soldering flying leads is definitely not recommended in a IC engine installation because the fatigue performance (resistance to vibration) of solder is quite shockingly bad. Crimping is in every way superior to soldering in this application. The problem is that finding the correct crimp tool is very difficult and expensive. I tried a couple on the hobby market but they could only be described as dangerous. I only have to try the test where I remove the part of the connector that grips the insulation then crimp it as normal onto the exposed conductor. In some cases the connector just falls off in others it can be pulled off easily, neither of these is not acceptable. The connector should be clenched so tightly onto the wire that a cold weld is formed and the wire strands should break leaving a full set of strands in the connector when pull tested.
Crimping or clamping to solder tinned wire is the worst of all worlds because the solder doesn't form a cold weld no matter how tightly it's gripped and it's surface oxidizes forming an insulating layer in the joint over time.

Andy.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 11:10 AM
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Florida
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I can confirm Xjets findings. As part of an aerospace lab test , we also found that properly done crimp connectors were far more reliable than soldered connection in all respects. I also agree with Vintage1 on soldering in extension (cut the original lead in half) wires is more reliable than any type of plug in extension.
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Old Jan 22, 2007, 12:32 PM
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United States, TX, Argyle
Joined Jan 2005
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Any one try these pins?

http://www.allerc.com/product_info.p...oducts_id=2030


All I want to know is how are you making custom length servo extenders that are not the standard lenght 8 inch 12 inch 24 inch ones you can buy.

I tried using the pins from my first post and they did not work.
I am quite sure it was the quality of the part rather than the assembly of the part as I tested the pins unassembeled and the connection was not acceptable.=

Lets not get into a solder vs crimp debate been there read that already.

All I want to know is how to make or BUY servo extendors that are custom length.
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