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Old Jun 07, 2004, 12:00 PM
Andy
Guest
n/a Posts
flapperons

Hi all,
I am having a go at setting up flapperons on my Tail dragger. I am doing it
using chanels 1 & 6 and wing- mixing them in my futaba set. It has been
suggested that I program-mix some down elevator (channel 6 the master and
channel 2 the slave) to help keep the nose level, can anyone suggest a
percentage of mix for this. Also any views on the pros and cons of using
flapperons would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Andy.


Old Jun 07, 2004, 12:00 PM
MJC
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: flapperons

There's absolutely NO way to guess the elevator to aileron mix that will
work best when using flaperons. Each aircraft is different so the only thing
you can do is to dial in about 5% as a "guess" start point and try it. You
should be able to get it right after 3 or 4 test flights.
Flaperons are fun and are a good alternative to flaps if the aircraft is
already built and you want to play a little. The only thing to watch out for
is that the aircraft will tipstall easier with flaperons than it will with
flaps so do some stall tests at altitude until you learn to judge a safe
slow speed with the flaperons down.
You don't say what kind of aircraft you have, but if it's a floater like
a Cub or something of that sort, you might have more fun with spoilerons.
It's the same set up except that you're dialing UP aileron on both sides
(and also some up elevator to compensate). With a floater, you're problem is
not usually slowing down for landing (needing flaps), but that the aircraft
doesn't want to land and floats down the entire runway while it "thinks" of
landing. Spoilerons are fun as hell because you can pop the switch on final
and come in for an almost "carrier" landing.

MJC


"Andy" <a.staples2@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
newsNZwc.579$WM3.280@newsfe6-gui.server.ntli.net...
> Hi all,
> I am having a go at setting up flapperons on my Tail dragger. I am doing

it
> using chanels 1 & 6 and wing- mixing them in my futaba set. It has been
> suggested that I program-mix some down elevator (channel 6 the master and
> channel 2 the slave) to help keep the nose level, can anyone suggest a
> percentage of mix for this. Also any views on the pros and cons of using
> flapperons would be appreciated.
> Thanks.
> Andy.
>
>



Old Jun 07, 2004, 12:00 PM
Andy
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: flapperons

Thanks for your reply MJC My model is Blackhorse models Super Air Low wing
sport/aerobatic...
Andy.


"MJC" <nospam@noway.com> wrote in message
news:ca1r5m$ksl@library1.airnews.net...
> There's absolutely NO way to guess the elevator to aileron mix that

will
> work best when using flaperons. Each aircraft is different so the only

thing
> you can do is to dial in about 5% as a "guess" start point and try it. You
> should be able to get it right after 3 or 4 test flights.
> Flaperons are fun and are a good alternative to flaps if the aircraft

is
> already built and you want to play a little. The only thing to watch out

for
> is that the aircraft will tipstall easier with flaperons than it will with
> flaps so do some stall tests at altitude until you learn to judge a safe
> slow speed with the flaperons down.
> You don't say what kind of aircraft you have, but if it's a floater

like
> a Cub or something of that sort, you might have more fun with spoilerons.
> It's the same set up except that you're dialing UP aileron on both sides
> (and also some up elevator to compensate). With a floater, you're problem

is
> not usually slowing down for landing (needing flaps), but that the

aircraft
> doesn't want to land and floats down the entire runway while it "thinks"

of
> landing. Spoilerons are fun as hell because you can pop the switch on

final
> and come in for an almost "carrier" landing.
>
> MJC
>
>
> "Andy" <a.staples2@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
> newsNZwc.579$WM3.280@newsfe6-gui.server.ntli.net...
> > Hi all,
> > I am having a go at setting up flapperons on my Tail dragger. I am

doing
> it
> > using chanels 1 & 6 and wing- mixing them in my futaba set. It has been
> > suggested that I program-mix some down elevator (channel 6 the master

and
> > channel 2 the slave) to help keep the nose level, can anyone suggest a
> > percentage of mix for this. Also any views on the pros and cons of using
> > flapperons would be appreciated.
> > Thanks.
> > Andy.
> >
> >

>
>



Old Jun 07, 2004, 09:00 PM
John Hollinshead
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: flapperons


> I am having a go at setting up flapperons on my Tail dragger. I am doing

it
> using chanels 1 & 6 and wing- mixing them in my futaba set. It has been
> suggested that I program-mix some down elevator (channel 6 the master and
> channel 2 the slave) to help keep the nose level, can anyone suggest a
> percentage of mix for this. Also any views on the pros and cons of using
> flapperons would be appreciated.



Why not go full house, Use the Air brake switch to have flapperons,
spoiler/air brake, then set up flapperons to elevator on another switch the
combinations are exhilarating or is that adrenaline running.


Old Jun 07, 2004, 09:00 PM
Dan Thomas
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: flapperons

"MJC" <nospam@noway.com> wrote in message news:<ca1r5m$ksl@library1.airnews.net>...
> Flaperons are fun and are a good alternative to flaps if the aircraft is
> already built and you want to play a little. The only thing to watch out for
> is that the aircraft will tipstall easier with flaperons


Not tipstall. Wing-drop stall.

> You don't say what kind of aircraft you have, but if it's a floater like
> a Cub or something of that sort, you might have more fun with spoilerons.
> It's the same set up except that you're dialing UP aileron on both sides
> (and also some up elevator to compensate). With a floater, you're problem is
> not usually slowing down for landing (needing flaps), but that the aircraft
> doesn't want to land and floats down the entire runway while it "thinks" of
> landing.


Airplanes that "float" are typically being approached with too
much speed. Almost any airplane will do this if the approach speed is
too high. Rule of thumb is to approach at 1.3 times stall speed (which
can be difficult to determine without airspeed information) and to
bleed speed off further by reducing power and raising the nose a bit
before getting into ground effect.
I used to fly a Taylorcraft, which is famous for its float. I
found that I had to approach no faster than 1.3 times stall, and then
get even that down before getting near the ground. I see other
modelers approaching way too fast, or too high and then diving at the
runway, which produces the same problem. You have to PLAN your
approach way back on downwing leg, get the right speed at the right
altitude at the right point. Then the airplane is easy to land.
Spoilers shouldn't be necessary except for very slick, very fast,
low-drag airplanes like airliners or a very few smaller singles. Those
are the only full-scale airplanes you'll ever see them on.

Dan
Old Jun 08, 2004, 12:00 PM
MJC
Guest
n/a Posts
Re: flapperons

Umm... the wing usually tags along with the wing tip. Too much sugar in your
coffee??

As far as the spoilerons on a floater that won't land: You never flew a
giant Telemaster, have you?

MJC

"Dan Thomas" <Dan_Thomas_nospam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:43cbd38a.0406071723.64b4b10d@posting.google.c om...
> "MJC" <nospam@noway.com> wrote in message

news:<ca1r5m$ksl@library1.airnews.net>...
> > Flaperons are fun and are a good alternative to flaps if the

aircraft is
> > already built and you want to play a little. The only thing to watch out

for
> > is that the aircraft will tipstall easier with flaperons

>
> Not tipstall. Wing-drop stall.
>
> > You don't say what kind of aircraft you have, but if it's a floater

like
> > a Cub or something of that sort, you might have more fun with

spoilerons.
> > It's the same set up except that you're dialing UP aileron on both sides
> > (and also some up elevator to compensate). With a floater, you're

problem is
> > not usually slowing down for landing (needing flaps), but that the

aircraft
> > doesn't want to land and floats down the entire runway while it "thinks"

of
> > landing.

>
> Airplanes that "float" are typically being approached with too
> much speed. Almost any airplane will do this if the approach speed is
> too high. Rule of thumb is to approach at 1.3 times stall speed (which
> can be difficult to determine without airspeed information) and to
> bleed speed off further by reducing power and raising the nose a bit
> before getting into ground effect.
> I used to fly a Taylorcraft, which is famous for its float. I
> found that I had to approach no faster than 1.3 times stall, and then
> get even that down before getting near the ground. I see other
> modelers approaching way too fast, or too high and then diving at the
> runway, which produces the same problem. You have to PLAN your
> approach way back on downwing leg, get the right speed at the right
> altitude at the right point. Then the airplane is easy to land.
> Spoilers shouldn't be necessary except for very slick, very fast,
> low-drag airplanes like airliners or a very few smaller singles. Those
> are the only full-scale airplanes you'll ever see them on.
>
> Dan



 


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