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Old Feb 08, 2013, 09:37 AM
Frankenstein recycled packs
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Be sure to solder the wires directly to the binding post unless you are only pulling around 20 amps constant. I melted a few in mytesting at 38 amps.
Reminded me of the early Chrysler full flow ammeters and the failures that plagued them for 3 decades.

Rick
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Old Feb 08, 2013, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by rampman View Post
Be sure to solder the wires directly to the binding post unless you are only pulling around 20 amps constant. I melted a few in mytesting at 38 amps.
Reminded me of the early Chrysler full flow ammeters and the failures that plagued them for 3 decades.

Rick
What size wire were you using?
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Old Feb 08, 2013, 09:43 PM
Frankenstein recycled packs
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10 ga stranded.
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Old Feb 09, 2013, 06:41 PM
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10 ga stranded.
Wow...I'm using the same stuff, but I used crimped ring terminals. The binding posts I bought are not designed to be soldered to. I suppose I could find some HD copper ones online, but I'm not going to be charging huge packs (3S and smaller) so I'll probably be OK for now.

If you don't mind, could you post a link to the posts you ended up using?

thanks
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Old Feb 09, 2013, 10:04 PM
Frankenstein recycled packs
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From here.
https://rcmicroflite.3dcartstores.com/
They don't list them but they are nothing special. Any of these are not made to be soldered to so I solder an eyelet to the 10ga wire, shrink around this connection and use the second nut to "lock" the terminal to the post. That is the weak spot as as designed, if you use one nut only the plastic/nylon will heat up and shrink ending in a thermal meltdown. And, if your wire/teminal connection gets warm the same thing happens. I found out the hard way on one of my 12V 54A supplies that had one fail at around 35 amps.
Then I put larger heat shrink around this whole connection to keep someone from shorting the exposed connections on the binding posts by accident.

Rick
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Last edited by rampman; Feb 11, 2013 at 10:15 AM. Reason: Added specifics of wire/binding connections
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Old Feb 09, 2013, 11:07 PM
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I just discovered this thread which was great since I was trying to figure out which server supply to go with. I purchased a PL6 a few weeks ago and need a better supply for it. I was originally planning on just buying a pair of already converted supplies until I discovered how much I could save doing it myself. Just ordered a pair of these supplies, should be here next week.

I'm not planning on even using binding posts on mine. Most likely will either make up some pigtails terminating with the EC5 my PL6 uses or maybe some other type of connector. I'm not convinced binding posts will handle the current. Most of the ones I looked at are only rated at 15A or so. Some short 10 ga pigtails soldered right to the stabs on the outside of the supply should work out the best. I'm also planning to pick up an LM34 temp sensor to automate the fan control.

Now if I could just solve the problem I'm going to have charging at the field. I really don't want to have to buy a generator and deep cycle batteries aren't a great source considering the potential of these current crop of chargers.



Mike
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Old Feb 13, 2013, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeCr View Post
I just discovered this thread which was great since I was trying to figure out which server supply to go with. I purchased a PL6 a few weeks ago and need a better supply for it. I was originally planning on just buying a pair of already converted supplies until I discovered how much I could save doing it myself. Just ordered a pair of these supplies, should be here next week.

I'm not planning on even using binding posts on mine. Most likely will either make up some pigtails terminating with the EC5 my PL6 uses or maybe some other type of connector. I'm not convinced binding posts will handle the current. Most of the ones I looked at are only rated at 15A or so. Some short 10 ga pigtails soldered right to the stabs on the outside of the supply should work out the best. I'm also planning to pick up an LM34 temp sensor to automate the fan control.

Now if I could just solve the problem I'm going to have charging at the field. I really don't want to have to buy a generator and deep cycle batteries aren't a great source considering the potential of these current crop of chargers.



Mike
I guess it's less about what the chargers can do and more about how you'll use them.
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Old Feb 15, 2013, 08:12 PM
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FYI:

I just did this on the 7000814 and 1 thing did not work as expected:

The fan speed adjust using C2 to D3 did nothing for me switched or jumped. B2 also did nothing. At one point as I was trying jumpers the fan all but stopped and then very slowly started coming back to full RPM.

I did get an increase in voltage jumping A2 to 12V so I eliminated the resistor. When jumped, fan speed increased slightly.

Thanks!

***EDIT***

I must have had a bad connection to B2 as when I removed the switch wiring and then re-soldered to the pins the fan now slows to a very quiet speed with the switch closed!!!

Now to do PSU #2. BTW, I got both on ebay for $14.25 shipped! They appear to be unused as there is no dust anywhere inside or on the fan blades.
I got my supplies today and I had the same problem. C2 does nothing but B2 drops the fan speed significantly. Apparently the diagram showing C2 as the fan speed control is wrong. Actually I was expecting the noise level of the fan to be higher. It really isn't all that bad, at least I didn't think so. I'm going to order some LM34 sensors to control fan speed.

Now that I've verified both supplies work it's time to get to work modifying them. Can't wait to try them out on my new PL6!.

Thanks for all the info guys!


Mike
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Old Feb 15, 2013, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeCr View Post
I got my supplies today and I had the same problem. C2 does nothing but B2 drops the fan speed significantly. Apparently the diagram showing C2 as the fan speed control is wrong. Actually I was expecting the noise level of the fan to be higher. It really isn't all that bad, at least I didn't think so. I'm going to order some LM34 sensors to control fan speed.

Now that I've verified both supplies work it's time to get to work modifying them. Can't wait to try them out on my new PL6!.

Thanks for all the info guys!


Mike
FYI....I ran my PSUs for hours on a 20-30 amp load and even on the low fan speed there was no discernible temp increase. I wouldn't worry about the sensors unless you just want something to do!
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Old Feb 16, 2013, 12:10 AM
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Originally Posted by iamtheav8r View Post
FYI....I ran my PSUs for hours on a 20-30 amp load and even on the low fan speed there was no discernible temp increase. I wouldn't worry about the sensors unless you just want something to do!
Thanks, that's good to know. For the time being at least I'll just wire up a switch.


Mike
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Old Feb 17, 2013, 10:00 AM
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Here's the completed system. I'm pretty happy with it, especially considering what I would have had to pay for a commercially available supply. I mounted both supplies to a piece of plexiglass I had lying around and I plan to add a handle.

I decided to just go with a switch but for those wishing finer control I did do a little experimenting. Per the previously posted PDF file I connected a 5K ohm potentiometer between +12v and return with the wiper going to pin B2. I found that with the pot all the way down (grounding pin C2) it would idle down as usual. The fan speed was variable up to full speed which occurred at approximately 3.3 volts. The pot will deliver 0-12V and anything above about 3.3V will be full speed. If a person so desired they could connect a resistor between the high side of the pot and +12V to avoid the dead band you'll have without it. Personally I don't see the need for the complexity of a pot or the LM34 temperature sensor as I don't feel the sound level is all that bad on high.




Mike
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Old Feb 18, 2013, 01:42 PM
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I just checked in after a long stay away from this thread. I've found the problem with B2 vs. C2 for the fan speed control is due to the fact there are a couple of pin diagrams out there, one of which numbers the pins (A, B, C...) from the top and one from the bottom. So C2 on one pin diagram is B2 on another. But just one pin works. Fortunately, trial and error will get you the right pin as connecting to the wrong one doesn't appear to do any damage.

I guess I've never pulled anything near rated current from these supplies as I've never had any trouble with the crimped binding post connections I've used. If I ever need high current, I'll solder to the binding posts or maybe even use pig tails instead. I went with the binding posts on the top of the box because leaving the tabs at the back of the power supply open scared me. I've got a piece of electrical tape over them now. I could have built some sort of shield used pigtails, but the binding posts out of the top of the supply were much easier with the tools I had available. I was aware of the possibility of shorts with internal components and positioned the binding posts carefully to avoid the problem. Fortunately, there is plenty of room inside the case. All in all, the binding posts on top of the case work well for me. Your mileage may differ.
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Old Feb 18, 2013, 05:40 PM
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I just checked in after a long stay away from this thread. I've found the problem with B2 vs. C2 for the fan speed control is due to the fact there are a couple of pin diagrams out there, one of which numbers the pins (A, B, C...) from the top and one from the bottom. So C2 on one pin diagram is B2 on another. But just one pin works. Fortunately, trial and error will get you the right pin as connecting to the wrong one doesn't appear to do any damage.

I guess I've never pulled anything near rated current from these supplies as I've never had any trouble with the crimped binding post connections I've used. If I ever need high current, I'll solder to the binding posts or maybe even use pig tails instead. I went with the binding posts on the top of the box because leaving the tabs at the back of the power supply open scared me. I've got a piece of electrical tape over them now. I could have built some sort of shield used pigtails, but the binding posts out of the top of the supply were much easier with the tools I had available. I was aware of the possibility of shorts with internal components and positioned the binding posts carefully to avoid the problem. Fortunately, there is plenty of room inside the case. All in all, the binding posts on top of the case work well for me. Your mileage may differ.
I decided to connect to the output stabs directly to minimize voltage drop. Plus I've never seen banana jacks that can handle anything close to the current this supply puts out.

As far as the B2/C2 thing, it has to be that the diagram is just wrong. The problem can't be where you reference A because then all the connections are wrong. The A1/B1/B6 connection then becomes D1/C1/C6 and it won't power up. Maybe what happened was whoever made up the diagram referenced the pins wrong just on that one pin.

At any rate I now have a supply that's a good match for my new PL6 charger that didn't cost me anywhere near what a commercially built supply costs! I found a 24V Meanwell supply online that was only slightly higher current, rated 63A, that was over $400!

Thanks for doing all the legwork. It saved me from sorting through all the pages of info!


Mike
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Old Mar 01, 2013, 08:31 PM
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Thank you wevets for this great thread.

I have a couple of questions and an observation...

1- Is it possible to hook up 3 ps's to get 36 volts?
2- Do you have to float all the power supplies? or keep the negative ps grounded and just float end one(s) supplying the +12V?

The thing that I noticed, at least on the one ps that I opened, the only screws that are grounded are the ones on the small board with the external connectors. Looking at the picture, you can clearly see the holes/pads, which would ground to the chassis when screwed in, are connected to the middle set of pins which are the 3 ground connections in the external block. The 3 screw holes in big board have no traces connected to them, so they would not have to be isolated. I don't know if that's the case with the one you have, or the other ones I have for that matter... Just what I saw in this one.

P.S. I had to put a screw in the hole in the 1st picture to block the light from the flashlight.
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Old Mar 04, 2013, 10:45 AM
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JoeRCee,

Thanks for the kind words.

To answer your questions:

1. Yes, you can hook up any number of power supplies to get 12 volt increments. 36 volts from 3 supplies should be no problem.

2. For safety's sake, you should float all the power supplies. When I started out on this project, I used a multimeter to test continuity between the all the screw holes I isolated and the chassis. That was a while ago, but as I recall, all but one of the screw holes was electrically connected to the chassis, even if I couln't see the connection. I did them all as the incremental cost of the last one was small and I wanted to be sure I didn't miss anything.

Another point is that these may be multi-layer circuit boards. That is, there may be connections buried between the visible top and bottom layers of connections. This is pretty common practice in the computer industry where these PS's came from. Multilayer boards make solving complex routing problems easier. 8-layer boards are not uncommon, especially in computer motherboards. 4-layer boards are all over the place. The fact that the holes are plated through means they could be electrically connected to any internal circuit board layer. The only way to check for grounding the chassis is with a multimeter.

From my point of view, there are a couple of problems with not floating all the power supplies. If you don't, you always have to hook them up in the same order, which requires you to remember which PS is which if you don't tie them to an insulated surface. And you certainly can't let someone else hook them up who might not get it right. Even if you do mount the power supplies on a board, or something like that, you have to be careful not to let any conducting items, like a screwdriver, inadvertently lie across the chassis. floating all the chassis is just safer no matter how you use these power supplies.

My two cents.

wevets
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Last edited by wevets; Mar 04, 2013 at 10:52 AM.
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