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Old Jan 12, 2015, 03:35 PM
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Do simulators help?

I like flying outside but in bad weather does a simulator help to teach technique. I usually crash more on a simulator and rarely if ever outside. Are they a good learning tool or a waste of money? Thanks Ron
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Old Jan 12, 2015, 05:17 PM
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whoa... definitely not a waste of money... the cost of not having one will be more on repair of your heli....

you are lucky for not crashing with your heli... the crashing on the sim must be giving you the correct reflects when you are flying...

don't give up on the sim.. especially if you live in crap climate like I do...
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Old Jan 12, 2015, 05:35 PM
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If you use the simulator as a training tool, deciding what you want to do and practising until you can do it cleanly, every time, it will help a lot. The usual reason why people crash a lot in sims is because they try flying planes far too advanced for them and doing things with them that they wouldn't dare to try out in the real world.

So if you treat the sim as a computer game and just play with it it won't help nearly as much.

Steve
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Old Jan 12, 2015, 07:26 PM
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Thanks all! Will keep trying. Ron
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Old Jan 12, 2015, 10:20 PM
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Sometimes on the sim I fly things way too advanced for me. Other times I try things that are beyond my skill level. Want to try 3d... well the sim is priceless there as I'd crash thousands of dollars of 'virtual' planes trying to learn the basic techniques. After a while, as long as you are taking it seriously and not using it as a game ,like slipstick said, you will improve.

Also if my sim has a plane I'm thinking of getting, it will show me if it is too much for me to handle. I have a couple of planes that should be way beyond my skill level, but using the sim I found some low rates that made them very flyable. (club build of a 3d profile as an example , I have the rates set so it flies like a sport plane and those rates came from the sim before I finished the build)
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Old Jan 16, 2015, 07:43 AM
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I am trying hard to not take it as a game. But I get strong impulses to just whack it into 3d and do random flight movements for fun. I can't seem to learn hovering longer than a minute.
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Old Jan 16, 2015, 09:28 AM
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NOW FOR THE BIG QUESTION!
After flying very good with a simulator what is the chance of it working outside in the real world. Can you use what you learned? Is the simulator a real example to follow. Have you all have success using simulators? Thanks Ron
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Old Jan 16, 2015, 10:37 AM
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That's more or less the same question as "does it help ?". Yes it does...still.

But if you really mean to ask if being able to fly a plane in the simulator automatically means that you'll have no trouble flying a similar plane out in the real world then the answer is an emphatic NO!. Simulators are good, they are not perfect. They HELP with learning to fly they don't completely REPLACE flying practise.

The simulators used to train airline pilots cost many millions of pounds/dollars. But a pilot still isn't let loose on your holiday flight until they are near perfect on the simulator AND have also done many hours flying the real thing with an instructor/check pilot along, just in case.

Steve
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Old Jan 16, 2015, 11:12 AM
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As someone that spent a few months flying simulators and having only recently flown a plane in the 'real world' I can say, that at least for me, the most important things I learned from the sims was orientation and/or muscle memory.

I've found myself 1/2 second away from a major crash a few times only to pull myself out of it with out thinking and I think that goes back to the time that I spent in sims.

I've seen a few others fly for the first time without any sim time and they really seem to struggle with orientation when the plane is flying towards them. I think sims are an easy way of learning to deal with that.

I'm still very new at this so I can't comment on much more than that. :-)

Good Luck and Have Fun. :-)
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Old Jan 16, 2015, 11:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darticus View Post
NOW FOR THE BIG QUESTION!
After flying very good with a simulator what is the chance of it working outside in the real world. Can you use what you learned? Is the simulator a real example to follow. Have you all have success using simulators? Thanks Ron
Should increase your chances of successful outside flights for sure.
I've had great success with my simulator, particularly in the realm of keeping orientation, learning to use the rudder, and recovering from "unusual attitudes".

With a simulator you quickly learn what works and what doesn't, and internalize it. Then, you react much more quickly than if you had to think too much about it.

You also learn what your weak points are and work to make them better. Really shortens the learning curve. That's been my experience.

I'm on the Phoenix simulator, which works well for me as my planes are all simulated there.
Are they perfect models? No, but close enough that they really help me perfect my outside skills. And easy enough to edit to make them more like my real planes.

Take care, rick p (Champ, T-28, Corsair, Yak-54, Pitts, AS3Xtra)
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Old Jan 16, 2015, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slipstick View Post
If you use the simulator as a training tool, deciding what you want to do and practising until you can do it cleanly, every time, it will help a lot. The usual reason why people crash a lot in sims is because they try flying planes far too advanced for them and doing things with them that they wouldn't dare to try out in the real world.

So if you treat the sim as a computer game and just play with it it won't help nearly as much.

Steve
This!

Sometimes you hear people talk about having a 'flight plan'. Do this for the sim as well. Have realistic objectives of what you want to work on to advance your skills.

sconnie
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Old Jan 17, 2015, 10:52 PM
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Yes, sims are a great way to learn the mechanics and muscle memory of R/C flying. I started over 14 years ago on my first R/C simulator and my instructor was certainly impressed by my ability to fly with so little training. Sims are not perfect and I did not learn how to fly without real world experience. It is definitely easier to try new stunts on the sims and way cheaper in the long run.
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Old Jan 23, 2015, 09:44 PM
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Sims are certainly worth having for a beginner. But don't expect to be able to fly a model straight off after spending time on a simulator.

They can be good to practice some manouevres that modellers, other than those who fly full-size aerobatic planes as well, almost never do. Also good to learn how to approach and land properly, which many modellers can't do. And you don't really have 'room' or 'time' to practice 'ideal' approaches and landings with an actual model as it all happens so fast, whereas a crash doesn't matter on a simulator. But you will have to read a full-size book to see how it should be done first. And it is REALLY worthwhile.

But unless you are some kind of 'gamer' they tend to bore your brains out after a while.
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Old Jan 23, 2015, 10:58 PM
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I also feel a good sim will definitely help your field flying. If you spend some time on the sim doing nothing but T.O's/ T & G's/ Landings, your confidence at the field will be much more enhanced. I use the same model Tx on the sim(Interface Edition) as I do at the field. I like RF-7 the best as I can edit the field for varied conditions to practice. The sim is especially beneficial for the winter months not at a field.....that is, unless you live in a southern warm locale.

Denny
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