HobbyKing.com New Products Flash Sale
Reply
Thread Tools
Old Jan 26, 2013, 03:53 PM
Planes & Falconry my passions
Feliperc's Avatar
New York
Joined Mar 2010
157 Posts
Discussion
Do you "dry" your engine when it won't be use for a while???

Hello.
I would like to know what you do with your engines when you put your planes away for winter (in my case).
Some people says that I have to remove the fuel from the engine when it won't be used for a while starting the engine with no fuel in the fuel tank until it goes off. Other people says that I should keep some fuel on it because it has oil and it will help to avoid corrosion. Other people says that it doesn't matter (either way is ok).
Thank you for sharing your knowledge,

Felipe.
Feliperc is offline Find More Posts by Feliperc
Reply With Quote
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Old Jan 26, 2013, 04:07 PM
TEAM BOCA
jeffie8696's Avatar
United States, IA, Muscatine
Joined Oct 2009
1,565 Posts
I drain the tank and plug the fuel lines then run the engine dry and apply after run oil liberally throughout. What kind of oil is a matter of much(heated) debate.
jeffie8696 is offline Find More Posts by jeffie8696
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 26, 2013, 04:15 PM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2011
1,525 Posts
Leaving fuel in it is the worst thing you can do.
datsunguy is offline Find More Posts by datsunguy
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 26, 2013, 07:23 PM
YAY the tourists are GONE
United States, MA, Sandwich
Joined Feb 2010
190 Posts
There are 2 ways to turn off a engine
1. While the engine is idling you close the throttle
2. With the engine on Wide open throttle you pinch or remove the fuel line

Now option 1 is a bad way to shut an engine off at the end of the day or close of the season be because it will leave fuel in the crankcase

Option 2 is a better way to turn off an engine. Because it does not leave as much fuel in the engine as just closing the other way.

Option 2 is usually refered to as "running the engine dry"
Kit_Builder is offline Find More Posts by Kit_Builder
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 26, 2013, 07:34 PM
Registered User
downunder's Avatar
Adelaide, South Australia
Joined Sep 2003
3,067 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kit_Builder View Post
Option 2 is usually refered to as "running the engine dry"
Other than having a crash option 2 is the the way all CL engines stop at the end of every flight and rust is virtually unheard of. Running dry doesn't mean running dry of oil though, just the fuel.

For storing over the winter, if your fuel has some castor in it then it'll be fine as is. If all synthetic then give the internals a good coating with an auto trans oil which will keep all the surfaces protected. Some synthetics tend to dribble off metal parts leaving them exposed to air and moisture.
downunder is online now Find More Posts by downunder
Last edited by downunder; Jan 26, 2013 at 07:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 27, 2013, 05:16 AM
Registered User
surfer_kris's Avatar
Sweden
Joined Jan 2008
964 Posts
With all castor fuel you have the protection, but it is still good to lubricate with another oil so that it doesn't freeze up as the castor goes from oil to resin...
surfer_kris is offline Find More Posts by surfer_kris
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 27, 2013, 06:39 AM
Registered User
epoxyearl's Avatar
United States, MD, Elkton
Joined Oct 2011
8,622 Posts
After -run oil in an engine covers all the spaces corrosion wants to get to.

If the engine is off the airplane, a zip-lock bag is good for storage, after oiling.

If still installed, stuff the muffler and carb openings with small pieces of paper towels, or cloth, to keep critters and moisture out.

I don't like 'dry' engines.
epoxyearl is online now Find More Posts by epoxyearl
RCG Plus Member
Latest blog entry: Just thinking out loud
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 27, 2013, 07:45 AM
probro 2567
kwj48's Avatar
Midlothian,VA
Joined Jan 2006
321 Posts
While all of the statements are true to nitro engines. With gasoline engines you can leave the fuel in the tank. It will help to keep the carb diaphram flexible and the tygon ( if using it ) flexible also. And even though many 2 stroke oils come with stabilizers in them I like to add a little extra in the mix.
kwj48 is offline Find More Posts by kwj48
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 27, 2013, 04:00 PM
Registered User
pilotpete2's Avatar
The Northeast Kingdom, Vermont
Joined Jun 2004
5,208 Posts
+1
Pete
pilotpete2 is offline Find More Posts by pilotpete2
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 27, 2013, 11:34 PM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2008
201 Posts
Hi Felipe,

I assume you are talking about glow engines? Yes your engine will thank you for some TLC when you lay it up for the winter

I agree with the others, best idea is to run your engine dry at the end of the days flying. Pinch or disconnect the fuel line from the carburettor with the throttle wide. Try and restart the engine a few times until it stops firing. This will burn of as much methanol and nitromethane as possible but will leave behind a good coating of oil.

If you use a castor based fuel then, as Downunder points out, the castor left behind will do an excellent job of coating the engine internals and protecting them from rust. As Surfer Kris says though, castor oil can gum up over time. This is only really a problem with ball bearing, ringed, or four stroke engines. If you run your engine with gummed up bearings the balls may skid and cause wear. A four strokes cam followers, valves or ring may stick giving running difficulties if not damage. None of this is a problem though, a little bit of heat and a solvent (fresh glow fuel will do) at the beginning of the season will free things up nicely before your first start. So castor is an acceptable storage oil, and very good for one week to the next.

Downunder is right about synthetic oil's shortcomings for engine storage. Some manufacturers add a plating agent to make the oil stick to the metal surfaces better, and anti corrosion agents. Many would disagree but I have found that these additives work fine for me, I have several engines that have been stored for several years with no corrosion or gumming up. I give my engines a generous helping of the same synthetic oil that I use in my fuel before I store them.

Most people would advocate the use of an after run oil as epoxy earl says. I used to use a 50/50 mix of kerosene and automatic transmission fluid on a daily basis with excellent results in two strokes. I got a bit of wear with four strokes though, probably because the oil was a bit thin. That wouldn't be a problem for winter storage though. The idea of the kerosene was to help get the oil fully distributed throughout the engine, over time it would evaporate leaving the oil behind. I never gave it time. You could just use straight ATF. There are proprietary ARO's out there, they cost more but I don't know if they offer any thing more than ATF. Don't use WD 40, it's not a good storage oil and will loosen any rust that might be in your engine which will then turn into a grinding paste.

You probably won't need to remove your engines and put them in a zip lock bag just for winter, but its a really good idea for long term storage, and certainly wouldn't hurt for the winter.

At the end of the day it's worth the small investment in time to run your engine dry and then add an ARO before laying it up

Just wanted to give you my experience but it matched the other posters so I ended up summarising their posts as well.

Dave H
gerryndennis is offline Find More Posts by gerryndennis
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 28, 2013, 03:34 AM
Registered User
DarZeelon's Avatar
Israel, Ramat HaSharon
Joined Nov 2003
1,155 Posts
Good post, Dave H!
DarZeelon is offline Find More Posts by DarZeelon
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 28, 2013, 10:03 AM
Planes & Falconry my passions
Feliperc's Avatar
New York
Joined Mar 2010
157 Posts
Thank you so much for sharing.
So, this is only for NITRO?
My engines are DA50 and DLE 55 (gasoline).
Thank you again for your time,
Felipe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gerryndennis View Post
Hi Felipe,

I assume you are talking about glow engines? Yes your engine will thank you for some TLC when you lay it up for the winter

I agree with the others, best idea is to run your engine dry at the end of the days flying. Pinch or disconnect the fuel line from the carburettor with the throttle wide. Try and restart the engine a few times until it stops firing. This will burn of as much methanol and nitromethane as possible but will leave behind a good coating of oil.

If you use a castor based fuel then, as Downunder points out, the castor left behind will do an excellent job of coating the engine internals and protecting them from rust. As Surfer Kris says though, castor oil can gum up over time. This is only really a problem with ball bearing, ringed, or four stroke engines. If you run your engine with gummed up bearings the balls may skid and cause wear. A four strokes cam followers, valves or ring may stick giving running difficulties if not damage. None of this is a problem though, a little bit of heat and a solvent (fresh glow fuel will do) at the beginning of the season will free things up nicely before your first start. So castor is an acceptable storage oil, and very good for one week to the next.

Downunder is right about synthetic oil's shortcomings for engine storage. Some manufacturers add a plating agent to make the oil stick to the metal surfaces better, and anti corrosion agents. Many would disagree but I have found that these additives work fine for me, I have several engines that have been stored for several years with no corrosion or gumming up. I give my engines a generous helping of the same synthetic oil that I use in my fuel before I store them.

Most people would advocate the use of an after run oil as epoxy earl says. I used to use a 50/50 mix of kerosene and automatic transmission fluid on a daily basis with excellent results in two strokes. I got a bit of wear with four strokes though, probably because the oil was a bit thin. That wouldn't be a problem for winter storage though. The idea of the kerosene was to help get the oil fully distributed throughout the engine, over time it would evaporate leaving the oil behind. I never gave it time. You could just use straight ATF. There are proprietary ARO's out there, they cost more but I don't know if they offer any thing more than ATF. Don't use WD 40, it's not a good storage oil and will loosen any rust that might be in your engine which will then turn into a grinding paste.

You probably won't need to remove your engines and put them in a zip lock bag just for winter, but its a really good idea for long term storage, and certainly wouldn't hurt for the winter.

At the end of the day it's worth the small investment in time to run your engine dry and then add an ARO before laying it up

Just wanted to give you my experience but it matched the other posters so I ended up summarising their posts as well.

Dave H
Feliperc is offline Find More Posts by Feliperc
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 29, 2013, 04:00 AM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2008
201 Posts
Well that kind of makes my post a bit redundant, yes I was talking about glow (nitro) engines.

I'm afraid I have little experience with petrol (gasoline) engines so I'll leave that to the experts. I'm sure someone will give you the information you need soon

Dave H
gerryndennis is offline Find More Posts by gerryndennis
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 29, 2013, 04:02 AM
Registered User
Joined Jun 2008
201 Posts
Thanks Dar

Dave
gerryndennis is offline Find More Posts by gerryndennis
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 29, 2013, 10:30 AM
Planes & Falconry my passions
Feliperc's Avatar
New York
Joined Mar 2010
157 Posts
From DA:

Felipe,
Generally, if you are going to store the motor for a long period of time you do want to run the gas out of the carb. Overtime the gas will become very thick and like a gel and can cause damage.


Thanks,
Jeff

Desert Aircraft


Thank you so much for your help guys!!!!!!
Feliperc is offline Find More Posts by Feliperc
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Question How much leeway do I have when choosing a common prop/fuel for a range of engines? murcielago Engines 6 Jan 22, 2013 02:55 AM
Discussion Do you need separate battery for your LED lights?! DYORD Multirotor Talk 8 Jan 15, 2013 08:29 AM
Discussion glue won't dry when adding spar to wing grfcon Slope 8 Jul 22, 2009 07:56 PM
Discussion What brand of After Rnu Lubricants do you use for your engine Starguard Off-road Cars 4 Jun 28, 2006 09:04 PM