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Old Oct 15, 2014, 03:11 AM
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Peter Phillipps's Avatar
Australia
Joined Dec 2004
136 Posts
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Multi engine micros

With the forth coming release of the four engine B17, was wondering
what other twin or four engine ums could/might be next!

Twin engine
Mitchell
Marauder
Twin Mustang
Beaufighter
Catalina
DC3
Heinkel
Dornier

Four engine
Liberator
Super Fortress
Constellation
Lancaster
Sunderland

Anyone got anymore?
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Old Oct 15, 2014, 06:19 AM
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PeteSchug's Avatar
Elmhurst, NY (Queens in NYC)
Joined Apr 2004
7,050 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Phillipps View Post
With the forth coming release of the four engine B17, was wondering
what other twin or four engine ums could/might be next!

Twin engine
Mitchell
Marauder
Twin Mustang
Beaufigter
Catalina
DC3
Heinkel
Dornier

Four engine
Liberator
Super Fortress
Constellation
Lancaster
Sunderland

Anyone got anymore?
I'd love a DH-88. Some of the civilian twins might be nice, like a Cessna 310 or a really small Derringer. For a weird twin I'd opt for Franklin's WACO UFP-7 with the jet engine slung underneath. Anyone who's ever seen it at an airshow has to wonder what it's like to fly something like that!
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Old Oct 15, 2014, 06:57 AM
Registered User
United Kingdom
Joined Jan 2013
206 Posts
Westland Whirwind please.




Or maybe a Blenheim (either variant)


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Old Oct 15, 2014, 04:25 PM
micro- modding madman
United States, VA, Charlottesville
Joined Aug 2014
133 Posts
I'd like to see some commercial aircraft... 737's and the like.
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Old Oct 15, 2014, 09:07 PM
AMA 685483
crtaylor's Avatar
Beaver Falls ,Pa
Joined Oct 2006
597 Posts
Beech 18
Tiger Cat
Aero Commander
Cessna Skymaster
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 12:25 AM
Registered User
North Carolina
Joined Sep 2003
2,238 Posts
They have GOT to do a DC-3/C-47. They would SELL LIKE HOT CAKES. I really hope they are considering one. Battery in the nose just like the Mossie. No CG issues here. They would be really sweet.
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 06:40 AM
Registered User
Zurich
Joined Apr 2006
3,612 Posts
please use correct nomenclature if possible

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Phillipps View Post
With the forth coming release of the four engine B17, was wondering
what other twin or four engine ums could/might be next!

Twin engine
Mitchell
Marauder
Twin Mustang
Beaufighter
Catalina
DC3
Heinkel
Dornier

Four engine
Liberator
Super Fortress
Constellation
Lancaster
Sunderland

Anyone got anymore?
There is a distinct and important difference between a motor and an engine. A motor has an external thermodynamic power source, whereas an ENGINE makes the thermodynamic conversion internally to iteself.

Thus one refers to a JET engine, and internal combustion engine, etc. The fullsize aircraft mentioned above all use reciprocating internal combustion ENGINES.

HOWEVER, these Micro RTF models use electric MOTORS!

Clear ....?


Lee
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 07:56 AM
rcnova
United States, IL, West Chicago
Joined Jul 2009
278 Posts
what about an ME-262 with duel ducted fan jets??
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 08:00 AM
rcnova
United States, IL, West Chicago
Joined Jul 2009
278 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by xlcrlee View Post
There is a distinct and important difference between a motor and an engine. A motor has an external thermodynamic power source, whereas an ENGINE makes the thermodynamic conversion internally to iteself.

Thus one refers to a JET engine, and internal combustion engine, etc. The fullsize aircraft mentioned above all use reciprocating internal combustion ENGINES.

HOWEVER, these Micro RTF models use electric MOTORS!

Clear ....?


Lee
not clear - that definition may work for you, however, it is really just semantics. They both convert one type of energy to another type (typically to mechanical energy).

Generally:

•A motor is a machine that converts other forms of energy into mechanical energy and so imparts motion.

•An engine is a motor that converts thermal energy to mechanical work.

So an engine is a specific type of motor. That's why it's not incorrect to speak of a motorboat, or a motorcar, or a motor speedway, even if the boat or car is clearly powered by combustion.

Note that if there's no combustion, there's no engine. Purely electric cars don't have engines.

However:

Per MIT:
ask an engineer section:
What’s the difference between a motor and an engine?

As with almost any word, it all depends how far you go back in time for your definition… As technologies and devices evolve, language must stay on its toes if we expect to understand each other when we talk about them. English-speakers are particularly flexible at adapting to progress. They’re willing to coin new terms, modify old meanings, and allow words that are no longer useful to pass from common usage. “The etymologies of ‘motor’ and ‘engine’ reflect the way language evolves to represent what’s happening in the world,” says MIT literature professor Mary Fuller.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines “motor” as a machine that supplies motive power for a vehicle or other device with moving parts. Similarly, it tells us that an engine is a machine with moving parts that converts power into motion. “We use the words interchangeably now,” says Fuller. “But originally, they meant very different things.”

“Motor” is rooted in the Classical Latin movere, “to move.” It first referred to propulsive force, and later, to the person or device that moved something or caused movement. “As the word came through French into English, it was used in the sense of ‘initiator,’ ” says Fuller. “A person could be the motor of a plot or a political organization.” By the end of the 19th century, the Second Industrial Revolution had dotted the landscape with steel mills and factories, steamships and railways, and a new word was needed for the mechanisms that powered them. Rooted in the concept of motion, “motor” was the logical choice, and by 1899, it had entered the vernacular as the word for Duryea and Olds’ newfangled horseless carriages.

“Engine” is from the Latin ingenium: character, mental powers, talent, intellect, or cleverness. In its journey through French and into English, the word came to mean ingenuity, contrivance, and trick or malice. “In the 15th century, it also referred to a physical device: an instrument of torture, an apparatus for catching game, a net, trap, or decoy,” says Fuller.

In the early 19th century, the meanings of motor and engine had already begun to converge, both referring to a mechanism providing propulsive force. “The first recorded use of ‘engine’ to mean an electrical machine driven by a petroleum motor occurs in 1853,” says Fuller.

Today, the words are virtually synonymous. “Language evolves to take on new tasks,” she explains. “Without thinking about it, we adapt to new meanings and leave the old behind.” We talk about our computer’s dashboard, unaware that in the 1840s, the word referred to the board at the front of a carriage that stopped mud from being splashed on the coachman. Similarly, the term “search engine” harks back to the older meaning of “engine” as a contrivance, suggests Fuller. First used in 1984 to mean “a piece of hardware or software,” the phrase may have been informed by Charles Babbage’s 1822 use of “engine” to mean a calculating machine.

The related word “engineer” was first used in 1380 to describe the constructor of military engines like siege works and catapults, and by the early 18th century, referred specifically to the maker of engines and machines. The OED lists a second definition of “engineer” as well. “It is synonymous with the older usage meaning ‘artifice,’” says Fuller. “An engineer is an author or designer of something, a person who contrives a plot, a schemer.” A definition one can only hope will soon pass from common usage.—Sarah Jensen
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 02:24 PM
Registered User
Zurich
Joined Apr 2006
3,612 Posts
correct language engineering

Very interesting points clearly made.

I happen to disagree, insofar as the world is no longer being led by native English-speakers, and precision of meaning is very important [esp. within the context of WHY "the West" is no longer ieading planetary destruction .... mean economically, sorry]. Or, to put it another way, the original Rocket Scientists, who came to the USA by way of Peenemünde, have long since gone.
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 03:53 PM
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Peter Phillipps's Avatar
Australia
Joined Dec 2004
136 Posts
Thought of a few more multi motor micros, that sounds good!

C130 Hercules


Condor.........http://www.google.com.au/images?clie...w&ved=0CCAQsAQ

A few from left field..............
Manchester bomber two engined Lancaster some with with a middle rudder.
http://www.google.com.au/images?clie...A&ved=0CCAQsAQ

Or how about a WW I Gotha...........
http://www.google.com.au/images?clie...A&ved=0CCoQsAQ

Or Vickers Vimy..........
http://www.google.com.au/images?clie...A&ved=0CB8QsAQ
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Old Oct 17, 2014, 06:29 PM
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dacaur's Avatar
Midvale, Utah, USA
Joined Mar 2005
8,962 Posts
I would like to see a B2N Islander....

As for the motor/engine debate... I think when talking about models of planes, either works... the real thing has engines, the model has motors..... Either is acceptable.
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Old Oct 19, 2014, 04:16 AM
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Zurich
Joined Apr 2006
3,612 Posts
the real experts know, and so should all ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by xlcrlee View Post
Very interesting points clearly made.

I happen to disagree, insofar as the world is no longer being led by native English-speakers, and precision of meaning is very important [esp. within the context of WHY "the West" is no longer ieading planetary destruction .... mean economically, sorry]. Or, to put it another way, the original Rocket Scientists, who came to the USA by way of Peenemünde, have long since gone.
UMX B-17G Flying Fortress BNF

Key Features

Completely built and flight ready
AS3X® technology provides superior flight performance
Ultra-lightweight construction with an authentic "Man O War II" trim scheme
Four-motor, counter-rotating operation with 3-blade propellers
Four-channel control includes throttle, aileron, elevator and rudder
Industry leading 2.4GHz Spektrum™ DSMX® technology
Performance ultra micro linear long-throw servos
Removable landing gear and simulated retracted wheels
Ultra micro 250mAh 1S 3.7V 20C Li-Po battery (included)
E-flite® 1S DC Li-Po charger (included)
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Old Oct 22, 2014, 01:05 PM
LEO THE LION TO THE KING
SOUTH CAROLINA U.S.A.
Joined Oct 2004
904 Posts
Jetstream airliner on twin and constellation on the 4
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Old Oct 22, 2014, 02:23 PM
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United States, WA, East Wenatchee
Joined Oct 2014
69 Posts
Beaufort / Beaufighter! Particularly if it could carry a foam torpedo, for mock attacks on my friend's Pruis.
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