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Old Today, 12:20 AM
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Joined Dec 2014
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Purchasing RC Plane for flyover Music Video footage

Hi everyone,

I'm very new to this scene and am in the process of deciding which RC plane would be most suitable to facilitate flyover FPV cinematography. I'm opting not to use a drone because it seems decent FPV drones are much more expensive.

At this stage, my plan is to secure a Mobius 1080p camera (https://www.mobius-actioncam.com/) to either an RC Cessna 182, or a single rotor glider. From what I've read the camera is best positioned at the aircrafts center of gravity and I need a clear shot (preferably from the roof) without a propeller visible in frame. I'm hoping to get flyover footage through a valley and above a forest canopy. Some shots will require a degree of proximity flying (flying within a few meters of ground and trees).

Here's the Model I'm referring to: http://www.skyartec.com/ProductShow.asp?ArticleID=1875

What I'm hoping to work out here is which choice of aircraft would be most suitable for this type of footage. I need something with good maneuverability and stable enough to capture 5 - 10 seconds (for each pass or flyover) at a time of smooth footage with minimal vibration.

I presume the Cessna option would be preferable due to its size, wingspan, weight and power and controllability. My main concern is how I'll manage to position the Mobius camera on top of the cockpit area, without compromising the aerodynamic performance of the plane. The Cessna 182 has a 1 meter wingspan but I would need to prop the camera to a heightened level above the cockpit to get a clear shot above the propeller. I would likely layer tape together as a platform to raise the camera about 1 inch, then tape it down securely.

Being positioned on the middle wing, directly in the center of the plane, just behind the cockpit and raised would mean that it would be in line with the plane's rudder. Will this have much impact on the plane's stability in flight?

Any informed advice would be greatly appreciated .
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Old Today, 06:39 AM
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United Kingdom, Scotland, Argyll and Bute
Joined Oct 2012
821 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dynamojo View Post
Hi everyone,

I'm very new to this scene and am in the process of deciding which RC plane would be most suitable to facilitate flyover FPV cinematography. I'm opting not to use a drone because it seems decent FPV drones are much more expensive.

At this stage, my plan is to secure a Mobius 1080p camera (https://www.mobius-actioncam.com/) to either an RC Cessna 182, or a single rotor glider. From what I've read the camera is best positioned at the aircrafts center of gravity and I need a clear shot (preferably from the roof) without a propeller visible in frame. I'm hoping to get flyover footage through a valley and above a forest canopy. Some shots will require a degree of proximity flying (flying within a few meters of ground and trees).

Here's the Model I'm referring to: http://www.skyartec.com/ProductShow.asp?ArticleID=1875

What I'm hoping to work out here is which choice of aircraft would be most suitable for this type of footage. I need something with good maneuverability and stable enough to capture 5 - 10 seconds (for each pass or flyover) at a time of smooth footage with minimal vibration.

I presume the Cessna option would be preferable due to its size, wingspan, weight and power and controllability. My main concern is how I'll manage to position the Mobius camera on top of the cockpit area, without compromising the aerodynamic performance of the plane. The Cessna 182 has a 1 meter wingspan but I would need to prop the camera to a heightened level above the cockpit to get a clear shot above the propeller. I would likely layer tape together as a platform to raise the camera about 1 inch, then tape it down securely.

Being positioned on the middle wing, directly in the center of the plane, just behind the cockpit and raised would mean that it would be in line with the plane's rudder. Will this have much impact on the plane's stability in flight?

Any informed advice would be greatly appreciated .
Hi, I have one of these and can say that I would never use it for any fpv or aerial photography.
It is not a good plane to start with and unlike the "blurb" states , it is not a user friendly plane.
As much as I like having it in my hanger, I've spent many an hour repairing it since it's pretty fragile.
I have tried fpv-ing it too and it wasn't pretty
My suggestion would be a Bixler type of "pusher". Much more stable, sturdy , cheap and with parts readily available.
The HK Drifter too could be a contender. Here's a shot of mine in action
nicktwinnflying- Drifter RC Ultralite (6 min 35 sec)
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Old Today, 06:58 PM
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Joined Dec 2014
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Quote:
Hi, I have one of these and can say that I would never use it for any fpv or aerial photography.
It is not a good plane to start with and unlike the "blurb" states , it is not a user friendly plane.
As much as I like having it in my hanger, I've spent many an hour repairing it since it's pretty fragile.
I have tried fpv-ing it too and it wasn't pretty
My suggestion would be a Bixler type of "pusher". Much more stable, sturdy , cheap and with parts readily available.
The HK Drifter too could be a contender

Ok thanks. So a Drifter/Glider is a better option for capturing smooth FPV footage (within a $100-$200 price range)? I'll do some reading up on gliders to see how they handle for my proximity flying purposes. That HK Drifter looks promising.

Anybody else have some suggestions?
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Old Today, 07:07 PM
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San Angelo TX.
Joined Feb 2006
1,306 Posts
IMO ,,, look for gliders !!! And if your new to RC ? Well start small .. And work up.
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Old Today, 07:58 PM
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Joined Dec 2014
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Ok, gliders sound like the go. This one isn't exactly small, I presume it needs to have reasonable size to carry the Mobius cam.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/FMS-4CH-1...item35cfdc6e85

Otherwise the HK Drifter mentioned above looks good.
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Old Today, 08:17 PM
La Mesa Air
La Mesa, CA
Joined Mar 2010
455 Posts
Why not hire a professional?

Getting high quality aerial video is not as easy as it looks. Most of us go through several iterations of aircraft and cameras before getting anything that is worthy of a music video. If you are just needing a few shots for your project, you will save yourself a lot of time and money by just hiring someone.

On the other hand, if you are looking to break into the hobby and work your way up to capturing quality video, than maybe building it yourself is the way to go. If that is the case, then I agree something like a power glider like the Bixler is a good place to start.
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Old Today, 09:07 PM
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Joined Dec 2014
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Yeah I realize it will take considerable time to learn how to fly adequately to get quality footage. Definitely interested in the hobby and always wanted an rc plane. It should be a fun challenge.
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Old Today, 10:23 PM
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Philippines, Calabarzon, San Pedro
Joined Jul 2012
4,488 Posts
If you're starting out, stay away from scale and go for foam gliders instead. They they can take a beating and if they do break, you fix them with barbecue sticks and hotglue and you're back in the air.

This seems like a good start.

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...50mm_PNF_.html

Mostly because the landing gear is removable. Start without the wheels and throwing it and land on grass, then when you're getting better, add the wheels and practice landing on a strip, then when you're really good, get a Volantex Ranger Ex. The thing's got extended landing gears and hardmounts specifically for a gimbal.

That's just the airframe. You'll still have to learn how a plane flies (flap, spoiler, stall, etc.), how the electronics work (Frequencies, interference, filtering, saturation, wiring spacing, etc.), flight management (OSD, RTH, Flight Planning, Battery Monitoring, etc.), and a load of other stuff. Give yourself six months to a year depending on how often you work on it.
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