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Old Dec 11, 2014, 06:32 PM
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Feeling pretty darn good about myself.

Today I was able to take my tower hobbies P51 up in the air completely solo. The weather was perfect about 70 degrees and little to no wind. It was a little scary at first because this time I flew it bound to my own Dx5e and I had to trim her, she needed a bit of left aileron trim. But after that she flies pretty smooth I really can't complain. I even did a few victory rolls, and loops. I also did that trick where you give it aileron at the top of a loop to straighten out, not sure what that is called. I'm fairly new still to flying but i wish I got into this years ago it's so much fun.

I also pretty really good knowing that this is my first full size plane. I started off with a champ, then got a few micro P51s lol three in total due to some mishaps. But the third micro P51 is doing great and taught me so much!
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 07:01 PM
Y=C+I+G
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United States, CA, Rosemead
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congrats.
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 07:15 PM
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It is a satisfying feeling, congrats!
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 07:48 PM
yank and bank!!
Joined May 2013
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Nice job.....the first time I flew my 1000mm p-51 (not counting a ridiculous initial mishap of my own doing), I just happen to stick a beautiful and almost unbelieveable landing.... so I know how you feel.
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 08:47 PM
Warbirdman
United States, MN, Plymouth
Joined Mar 2013
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Its good to hear about the joys and successes from other pilots.
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 09:05 PM
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Thanks guys!

It took me a few tries to get it down packed. It's been very windy here in south Florida lately and at first it was very frustrating especially with the poor little champ who would basically sit in one place on windy days. But I kind of view it as a blessing learning to fly in bad weather because now everything seems much easier. The micro birds helped out tremendously especially with the ailerons.

I have a questions for the more experienced pilots. How often and when do you guys use the rudder? Or is it mainly for landings and take offs? Also, is it common practice to put the radio in "low" mode for landings? I found the limited movement of the controls made it a little easier to land. But I managed to land in both settings
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 10:26 PM
yank and bank!!
Joined May 2013
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Originally Posted by ApexpretadorGT View Post
I have a questions for the more experienced pilots. How often and when do you guys use the rudder? Or is it mainly for landings and take offs?
Oh man.... stand by for one big debate....

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Originally Posted by ApexpretadorGT View Post
Also, is it common practice to put the radio in "low" mode for landings? I found the limited movement of the controls made it a little easier to land. But I managed to land in both settings
It's called "dual rates".... and it's frequently used for twitchy planes.
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 10:53 PM
Y=C+I+G
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Originally Posted by ApexpretadorGT View Post
How often and when do you guys use the rudder? Or is it mainly for landings and take offs? Also, is it common practice to put the radio in "low" mode for landings? I found the limited movement of the controls made it a little easier to land. But I managed to land in both settings
for my first 2 yrs in RC, i rarely used rudder. that said, i wish i had used it more. wise minds like chucksolo, etc., told me to do so. and of course, i was too lazy to try.

that said, you can actually fly, takeoff, land, quite well, without rudder. i have done so in pre-storm weather with 20+ mph winds. it comes down to two things: 1. experience 2. speed. the experience part is self-explanatory. on the speed part, with enough speed you can takeoff and land in high crosswinds without wiping out - using just ailerons. but for #2, you need a lot of #1.

now, the easy way: get used to the rudder and you won't have to get really good with the ailerons. but you gotta admit, with the ailerons, it is a wee bit more fun.
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Old Dec 11, 2014, 11:14 PM
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I've played with the rudder on every plane and I find the ailerons a bit easier once you figure them out. Plus I really like that I can leave the left joy stick alone and just focus on the aileron/elevator control
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Old Dec 12, 2014, 04:41 AM
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Australia, NSW, Grafton
Joined Dec 2012
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G'day ApexpretadorGT,
I think the roll out at the top of a loop is call an Immellman.
You trade speed for height and is often used to reverse the direction of an aircraft other than a flat turn.
A Cuban eight is a loop until you get three quarters around the loop, then you keep the model going down hill inverted at about a 45* angle, then roll upright and pull into another loop and repeat the first half.
I use my rudder a lot during all aspects of the flight from keeping them (I have three FMS Mustangs) straight on the take off roll right through to landing.
I tend to lead with the rudder during a turn. In other words I start the turn with the rudder and then use aileron input. Using the rudder will help prevent the tail from dragging ( staying lower than the nose) through the turn.
You only have to think about what I am saying and use your hands to understand how it works.
I use rudder more than aileron during landing as using ailerons at slower speeds will cause drag and can lead to a tip stall right when you do not need it.
It just take practice and practice and....you get the message
If you are landing on a fixed runway, stand side on to the strip and bring the model in to the threshold in line with your shoulder. Trust me it works.
You will always feel good as you pass the achievement level you set for yourself and I am glad that you do feel good. It is even better that you are getting to fly!
Regards and respect
Daryl
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Old Dec 12, 2014, 06:37 AM
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Yes, Wrongroad is correct in stating that the maneuver that you described is called an Immellman. It's the opposite of a "Split S". Both maneuvers are used to reverse direction. In the Immellman, you do half a loop, followed by half a roll. The plane ends up going in the opposite direction but higher and slower. In the Slit S, you do half a roll and then half a loop. The plane ends up going in the opposite direction but lower and faster. Do an Immellman followed by a Split S and you end up at the same elevation and direction as you started from.

Some RC planes benefit a great deal from using the rudder in turns, others have minimal effect. Experiment with using the rudder on your plane, but don't feel pressured that you MUST use the rudder. If you are enjoying flying the plane by setting the throttle and then just using the right stick, there is nothing wrong with that. I've been flying RC planes for nearly thirteen years and most of my flights have my left hand assisting on take-offs and landings and for supporting the transmitter.

Some "experts" will tell you that your DX5e is junk and that you must invest in a "decent" radio. Don't you believe them. While there are many advantages to the computer radios, as long as you are comfortable with your DX5e there is no reason to change radios, unless you will be flying a plane that requires 6 or more channels of control. For the past 8 years I've been flying all of my planes using a DX5e radio. I currently have 13 planes bound to it.
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Old Dec 12, 2014, 09:28 AM
The Balsa Farmer
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United States, AR, Sherwood
Joined Jul 2005
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I use rudder throughout the entire flight (from turns, to fine trimming). It is a forced habit to learn, but the more you use that thumb on the left stick for more than the throttle, the better pilot you become. Especially when you start flying more aerobatics.

Many folks on here don't like to use the rudder much, but hey, that cool. The larger the plane, the more rudder you'll have to use to make coordinated turns (a big Cub is a great example), but even the smaller planes benefit form using rudder. I just feel that the better you get at using the rudder, the better and more proficient a pilot you will become.

As for low rates or high rates on landings. I perfer low rates. But I also use a lot of expo in my controls (both high and low rates). Makes the plane fly a little "softer" - but to each thier own.

Having flown over 30+ years, I've learned from students and experienced pilots - that everyone is different. The main point is that you fly safe, have fun, feel confident in your flying, and never be afraid to ask for help - whether on here or at the flying field.
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Old Dec 12, 2014, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Leo L View Post
Yes, Wrongroad is correct in stating that the maneuver that you described is called an Immellman. It's the opposite of a "Split S". Both maneuvers are used to reverse direction. In the Immellman, you do half a loop, followed by half a roll. The plane ends up going in the opposite direction but higher and slower. In the Slit S, you do half a roll and then half a loop. The plane ends up going in the opposite direction but lower and faster. Do an Immellman followed by a Split S and you end up at the same elevation and direction as you started from.

Some RC planes benefit a great deal from using the rudder in turns, others have minimal effect. Experiment with using the rudder on your plane, but don't feel pressured that you MUST use the rudder. If you are enjoying flying the plane by setting the throttle and then just using the right stick, there is nothing wrong with that. I've been flying RC planes for nearly thirteen years and most of my flights have my left hand assisting on take-offs and landings and for supporting the transmitter.

Some "experts" will tell you that your DX5e is junk and that you must invest in a "decent" radio. Don't you believe them. While there are many advantages to the computer radios, as long as you are comfortable with your DX5e there is no reason to change radios, unless you will be flying a plane that requires 6 or more channels of control. For the past 8 years I've been flying all of my planes using a DX5e radio. I currently have 13 planes bound to it.
Everyone, thank you so much for the tips and advice it is truly appreciated and I love getting the input from more experienced pilots.

Correct me if I'm wrong but you can only bind one plane at a time to a dx5e correct? So do you have to trim every time you bind it to another plane? Or is there some dark magic going on here that I'm unaware of?! Lol
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Old Dec 12, 2014, 10:49 AM
The Balsa Farmer
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United States, AR, Sherwood
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I think (dont get me wrong) that you can only bind one plane to the DX5 (my better half uses the DX5 on her simulator and her trainer)_ I fly a DX6, DX7 and now a DX8. Still haven't tried tthe SD card feature on the DX8 yet.

But to answer the basis of your question, yes every time you put a new plane on a radio, it will have to be trimmed out.
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Old Dec 12, 2014, 11:49 AM
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Correct me if I'm wrong but you can only bind one plane at a time to a dx5e correct? So do you have to trim every time you bind it to another plane? Or is there some dark magic going on here that I'm unaware of?! Lol
This is a subject that brings out a lot of incorrect information. You DO NOT need to bind a plane every time you want to use it with the DX5e (or DX4e for that matter). When you bind a plane to a transmitter, you are binding the RECEIVER to the transmitter. The transmitter couldn't care less how many planes are bound to it. I currently have thirteen planes bound to my DX5e and I rotate which planes I fly. The last time that I had to bind a plane to my transmitter was over a year ago.

The issue that the DX5e (and DX4e) has is that it has no model memory, so it does not know the trim settings that you used for the plane or which servos are reversed. The solution to these problems is quite simple.

First, whenever you start flying a new plane and make trim settings to get it to fly propely, once the plane is on the ground you need to adjust the control rods, usually by screwing the clevis in or out, so that the trim tabs are set to neutral to have the plane fly properly. Everyone should do this on every plane they have to get the best performance from their servos. But if you have a computer radio with model memory or if you are only flying one plane, you can "cheat" by leaving the trim tabs at a given offset. (By the way, if you use SAFE, you cannot leave the trim tabs in an offset position. You MUST adjust the control rods as stated above). Once you have all of your planes set so that they fly properly with all trim tabs at neutral, you don't need to worry about trim settings in a model memory. Just pick up the plane and its ready to go ---- almost.

Second, whenever you are about to fly a plane for the first time that day, you should make it a habit to carefully check that all of the control surfaces are responding properly to your commands, that there is no hidden damage and that the hinges are not breaking and about to fall apart. While you are performing this check of the control surfaces, it's very easy to spot if a control surface is moving in the correct direction or if it needs to be reversed. As soon as you determine which control surface(s) need reversal, take out a key, flip the apprpriate servo reversing switch(es), re-check the control surface movement and you are good to go.

All of the pre-flight checks remain the same whether you are using a non-computer radio (DX5e/DX4e) or a computer radio. The difference is that with a computer radio you must make sure that you selected the correct model (say 2 seconds) while with the non-computer radio you might need to reverse one, two or three servo switches (say 2 seconds per switch). So in the worst case, the DX5e will take 4 seconds longer to prep for your flight than if you were using a computer radio.
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