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Parkzone Extra 300 BNF Review

Tear up the skies with Parkzone's new sports-aerobatics offering, the quintessential Extra 300! Napo goes from plane-unpacking to pavement-runway-taxiing in mere minutes.

Splash

Introduction

PARKZONE EXTRA 300

Wingspan:40.6 in.
Wing Area:286.75 sq. in.
Weight:34.5 oz.
Length:36.8 in.
Wing Loading:17.25 oz/sq. ft.
Servos:Four Parkzone digital, metal-gear servos
Transmitter:Spektrum DX7 Special Edition
Receiver:Spektrum AR500 full-range receiver (included with BNF version)
Battery:Parkzone 3S 2200mAh 25C LiPo (included with BNF version)
Motor:Parkzone 15-size, 950kV brushless motor
Charger:Parkzone 2S-3S DC balancing charger (included with BNF version)
ESC:E-Flite 30-amp brushless speed controller
Manufacturer:Parkzone
Available From:Horizon Hobby
Price:$184 for the plug-and-play version or $249 for the bind-and-fly version.

In the world of aerobatic aircraft, there's a plane that's all too common, and that's the Extra. Hailing all the way from Germany, it is the low- or mid-wing invention of aerobatic pilot Walter Extra. You can get a full-size Extra in any engine flavor you want, from 200 to 230 to 260 to 300 and even 330 horsepower — and when it comes to its R/C counterpart, the possibilities get multiplied. Big-time.

I've had a few Extras in my time (R/C, not the real deal), and my first one was a small Depron 260 one from E-Flite, now long discontinued. I always appreciated how nimble it was, yet how surprisingly gentle it was even at low speeds. A good backyard flier it was — until, just like with most Depron planes flown outdoors, it was time to award it some early retirement in appreciation of the good times and hard landings.

Now, from sister company Parkzone comes an Extra 300 of bigger proportions (a respectable 40-inch wingspan) and made of the much-tested-by-yours-truly Z-Foam material (smash, retrieve, relaunch — or at least that's how I approach it). It comes in either a bind-and-fly package or a less-expensive plug-and-play version. I'm going with the former, so follow along as I put this orange staple of the air races — and quintessential R/C aerobat — to the test.

Kit contents

As previously mentioned, you can bring home the Extra 300 in two varieties. The first one, which Horizon Hobby sent me, is the bind-and-fly, or BNF for short. It only requires a DSM2-compatible transmitter, and it includes everything from charger to battery to receiver. The other version, a bit more economical, is the plug-and-play (PNP for short), and it requires a battery and charger, along with the receiver of your choice.

When it comes to the DSM2 transmitter of choice, I used my trusty Spektrum DX7 Special Edition, but you can use the popular DX6i (which I reviewed here) or the newer JR9503 (read Jon Barnes' review of it here) or even the top-dollar JR12X for all you care (which Jay Smith reviewed here as well). You cannot, however, use the original Spektrum DX6 radio (it's a DSM radio, not the required DSM2). And, while not a must, I would recommend using a radio that allows for dual rates and exponential — this is, after all, an aerobatic plane, and it will need careful handling in the air.

Inside of my BNF kit, here's what I found:

  • A plane!: Indeed, it's all made of the fancy Z-foam and comes decorated in orange, purple and white. The 15-size motor is already installed, along with the 30-amp E-Flite speed controller, Spektrum AR500 full-range receiver and four servos. The wings are (obviously) detached, and so is the horizontal stabilizer and landing gear.
  • Battery: This is no small battery — it's a 3S 2200mAh 25C pack.
  • Charger: The included charger is of the DC variety, and the current can be adjusted. It can also charge either 2S or 3S LiPos through the balance tap.
  • Instructions: Detailed and illustrated, just the way I like them. If you want to peruse them yourself, check out the PDF.

Assembly

I think calling this an "assembly" would be a gross overstatement. After all, this is the kind of plane that you can go to the hobby shop for, drive to the local park and put together in the back of the pick-up truck. All that's required is a Phillips-head screwdriver and 15 minutes of your precious life. Let's build, shall we?

SERVICE NOTE: Horizon Hobby has released a small addendum to the instructions, since some people had reported the mail wheels vibrating and possibly coming loose because the wheel nut was getting unscrewed. The solution is simple: Remove the nut, add some thread-locker and reattach it. Simple enough. I didn't wait for my wheel to possibly fall off, so I went ahead and took care of this small issue without much fanfare. Now, back to your regularly scheduled programming.

First, the landing gear slides into the fuselage, and then the wheel pants get secured to the fuselage with a couple of screws. That concludes this part of the show, and then it's off to the wing, where the wing tube slides into place. Once that's done, insert each wing, route the servo wire to the respective destination, attach the wires to the Y-harness (it doesn't matter which one goes to each end) and finally secure the wing to the fuselage with the included screws.

The last part involves sliding the horizontal stabilizer into the fuselage, making sure the control horn is on the right. After securing in place with some tape, attach the pushrod to the control horn. Then, match all the servo leads to the proper pins in the receiver, put the propeller and spinner on the business end of the Extra... and admire your 15-minute creation, for you are finished, my friend.

Setting up the CG and travel rates

The recommended/included battery fits snugly into its designated space, so there's little wiggle room for adjustment. That said, it balances just fine at the recommended 2.75 inches from the leading edge at the wing root — and as you progress, you may be able to move it around. Horizon recommends the battery to be all the way forward, but I found the sweet spot with the 2200mAh pack secured in the middle of the hatch, or balancing roughly three inches from the leading edge.

When it comes to the travel rates, I went by the book on it, and it goes as follows:

Recommended control throws
High rates Low rates
Ailerons 30mm (1.18 in) 12mm (0.47 in)
Elevator 37mm (1.46 in) 10mm (0.39 in)
Rudder 55mm (2.17 in) 35mm (1.38 in)
Expo settings 55% on high rate for ailerons, 70% on high rate for elevator, 45% on high rate for rudder 40% on low rate for ailerons, elevator and rudder
I did end up adding a bit more elevator throws to my Extra, and I also set all the high rates to 60% expo and 30% for low rates, but that's all personal preference.

All along, I had been charging the battery, which took a while to charge with the supplied DC charger. It appears one of the three cells was not as balanced as its two counterparts, so it took a while for it to get back to speed. After that, subsequent charges were more in tune with what a 1C-charge-rate would take — not more than an hour.

All looks good, and the wind is nowhere to be found outside... so hop on the car, for we're field-bound and down.

Flying

Before getting airborne, it was time for a quick reality check under the hood: Just how much power was being produced out of this power system? So, I hooked up my meter, and lo and behold, the numbers were staggering: a whopping 32 amps and and even-more-whopping 370 watts. That adds to about 175 watts per pound — oh my. This will be an exciting ride, let there be no doubt about that.

Take-off and landing

You don't need much room to get airborne with this Extra 300: A mere 20 yards, if not less, should have you in the air without a problem. And, despite the inclusion of wheel pants, I was surprised to see that the plane does taxi well on both short grass and gravel (I sometimes like the roads less traveled when it comes to take-offs, what can I say?).

This Parkzone creation includes a steerable tailwheel, and it's a nice addition. On pavement, it taxies quite well, and you'll soon realize that low rates will go a long way when it comes to cruising around a runway.

"EXCUSE ME, BUT DID YOU MOUNT YOUR WINGS UPSIDE DOWN?"

A much-discussed topic, which prompted a second service bulletin for this plane, is the fact that, when looking at the wings' airfoil, it appears as if they are, indeed, mounted upside down. I did not notice it at first, but after a fellow author pointed it to me, I took a peek, and there it was: an slightly inverted airfoil of sorts. Yes, I'm not the most observant person in the face of the universe, thank you very much.

According to Horizon Hobby, the reason for it is "a result of paint shrinkage or installation of the blade spar in the lower surface of the wing during manufacturing." The company, however, says that this should have no adverse effect on flight characteristics. In essence, the wings are molded right, but a manufacturing issue has made some of them look like slightly distorted.

Did I notice any difference in flight? I personally didn't, but, then again, I'll be the first to admit I'm no world aerobatic champion at the sticks. But, frankly, I sensed no odd tendencies in flight — no tip-stalling at speeds where they should not be tip-stalling, no instabilities, nothing too unexpected. In fact, inverted flight was extremely stable.

Is it an issue, though? Of course it is. If for no other reason than for aesthetics, I hope it gets resolved. But, for the time being, I'm going to keep flying the Extra 300 this way until, well, the wings fall off.

Of course, if you're like me and are constantly in a hurry, a quick hand-toss might be the way to go. It's doable without much fanfare, and with so much horsepower under the cowling, all it takes is a simple toss at half-throttle while holding the Extra behind the canopy at a slight upward angle. Off it will go, departing from the owner's hands, sky-bound.

For a plane that boasts a wing loading of 17.25 oz./lb., getting back to solid ground was amazingly — and shockingly — simple. I thought it would be more of a brick when it came time to kill the throttle and land, but I found myself overshooting the runway more often than not. It glides and glides, and then it glides some more. It is far floatier than one would expect, and as long as low rates are set on the radio and a bit of power is kept, one should not have any problems — other than overshooting the runway, of course. And, again, even with the wheel pants on, I had little trouble keeping it upright after the wheels hit the ground. It rolled just fine without coming to an abrupt stop and/or going belly-up.

Basics

One thing is for certain: The Parkzone Extra 300 is not advertised as a 3D kind of aircraft, and a 3D kind of aircraft it is not. Let there be no doubt: It is a sport-aerobatics plane if I ever saw one. And that's not a bad thing in and of itself — it is the nature of this beast. It requires power (which it does not lack whatsoever) to stay in the air, and once it's going, it covers ground like it was meant to do. This is no low-and-slow kind of aircraft — this is fast-paced aerobatics of the tried-and-true variety.

That said, it does not lack stability. It tracks well, and while it required a bit of left aileron and rudder trim, along with a small dose of up-elevator trim to get it all dialed in, it did not require much finessing other than that. It is a precise aircraft, offering crisp rolls and any other aerobatic maneuver you throw its way with rapid response.

In the air, it will require a bit of power to maintain stability, however. I found that anything half throttle and above provides enough airspeed without the Extra 300 wanting to stall out. On the other hand, one will soon notice that, at lower speeds, there is a slight tendency for tip-stalls and the like — just as expected from a plane with such a wing loading. So, the moral of the story? Keep it moving, and don't slow down.

The installed power system and electronics perform just fine. The servos are nice and responsive, and the fact that they're digital and feature metal gears is a nice plus, indeed. I did not have any issues with the E-Flite speed controller (even if, at full throttle, the power system lightly exceeded the 30-amp rating for the ESC), and the battery offers plenty of power all along the duration of the flight without dropping noticeably. The 15-size, 950kV motor does its job well, too.

One thing that struck me as a bit odd, however, was the prop selection — a seldom-heard-of 10.5x9 propeller (apparently tailor-made for this plane). It works well, don't get me wrong — but it has an awful lot of pitch, and you could tell that at times it did provide a bit of torque (especially in post-stall maneuvers). A prop is something that's easy to change, and some may in fact be happy with this option. For the purposes of this review, I did not astray from the recommended gear, but another option might be in store for those who may be looking for slightly different flight characteristics — or can't find this prop in store.

Another thing that's easily remedied, yet worthy of mentioning, is the fact that the color scheme, while mightily attractive, can lead to disorientation at times. The bottom and top of the aircraft are the same color, so at times it can get confusing. Should that be the case, remedy is but a roll of tape or can of paint spray away.

Flight times will vary depending on your style, but I found that I could be in the air for a good seven to eight minutes without worrying about the battery hitting the low-voltage cutoff. That offered more than enough time for some good aerobatic routes. And, speaking of which...

Aerobatic/special flight performance

This is not your putt-around-lazily-in-the-dusk kind of airplane (for that kind of stuff, Horizon Hobby has its own inventory, and I have reviewed one them which happens to be a favorite of mine). So, forget about the lazy figure-eights. It's time to tear up the sky, one prop revolution at a time — and here's the report:

  • Loops: These are simple to perform, be they big and slow or tight and fast. A bit of rudder correction is always in order with this kind of sport plane — and the torque effect from the 10x9.5 prop may be noticed here — but loops are nice to do, indeed.
  • Rolls: These are a non-issue, and they're amazingly crisp — and amazingly fast, or course. The Parkzone digital servos are noticed here quite well, as they stop the roll on a dime.
  • Four-point rolls: Aided by the responsive rudder, these are a hoot to perform as well. They're precise, and during the inverted portion of them, the Extra maintains great stability.
  • Inverted flight: Soon, you'll see in the video that I cannot get enough of this. It is, simply put, one of the best flying characteristics of this Extra 300 (hey, maybe there's an upside — no pun intended — to the wing looking as it were upside down, after all...). I find myself being wheels-up more often than I find myself being canopy-up, and inverted flight is almost (almost!) hands-off. It is stable, and it has no tendencies of pitching the nose one way or another.
  • Spins, tumbles and the like: These are as wild as they get. They're fast, G-force-pulling and certainly worthy of an aerobatic round of applause from the peanut gallery. One word of caution, however: The Extra does take a bit of room to recover. It will not head straight into level flight as soon as you put everything back to neutral, so leave yourself just a hint of extra wiggle room before attempting the next tumble.
  • Knife-edge flight: This is another area where it excels. There's not a lot of coupling necessary to perform it (though it does them better from right to left for some reason...), and they look great in the air. High-alpha knife-edge flight is not as easy to accomplish on this plane, but it's still part of the repertoire nonetheless. Thanks to the massive rudder, you should be on your way to great sideways-flight bliss.
  • Knife-edge turns and spins: They are also quite good, though outside knife-edge turns will require plenty of finessing, or else there will be a stall in the making. But either option is doable, and the Extra 300 is up to the task.
  • Harrier flight and hovers: These are the strictly-3D maneuvers, and this is where the Extra might end up having a harder time performing them. For starters, it's a bit on the chunky side (no offense, Dear Extra, they're still voluptuous curves you've got there), so any kind of low-and-slow flight may be a bit of a challenge. I had a hard time with wing rock with upright harriers, and I also noticed tremendous torque (thanks to the 10.5x9 prop) during hovers. Does that bother me, however? Not really — for this is a sports-aerobatics plane, and I never expected it to live up to greatness in this department.

Flight video

Downloads

Is this for a beginner?

Parkzone planes tend to be relatively easy to fly ("Just Fly!" is its motto, after all), but in the case of the Extra 300, a bit of previous experience is required. It is an aerobatic aircraft of the highest order, and it will continue its intended path with zero self-correcting tendencies. That, combined with crazy amounts of power, is a lethal combination for novices. It is relatively gentle, sure, and it glides more than I would expect it, too — but it still has an insane roll rate and will not straighten itself out on its own.

That said...

I was fortunate enough (for lack of a better excuse), to put this Extra through a durability-test at the Monasterio Electric Aerospace Institute and Crash Test Facility© (motto: "Electrons Rule, Yet Gravity Always Laughs Last"©). Not just once, but twice (Extra review, extra crash, right?), all in the name of science!

The first time, I went for a little spin and started recovering about 150 feet later than I should have. I planted it in style, in the likes of great YouTube videos. The only difference? There was no foam confetti, no need for a plastic bag, no fanfare. I broke the spinner, the prop and the cowl, and the landing gear was in minor need of some Gorilla Glue at the base. But, other than that, it was intact as we know it. No strange chunks of foam, no missing tape, no real walk of shame. Success (of sorts)!

The second time, I lost orientation in the middle of an outside knife-edge turn and it slowly drifted its was to the thorniest patch I could have landed it in. After a treacherous trek to the scene of the crime, I found the plane stuck amid thorns and bushes, unscathed other than minor scratches and a fingernail-sized piece of foam coming apart from the rudder. Success (of sorts) again!

So, in summation, this is no beginner plane, but it could make a good third or fourth aircraft — and a first aerobatic machine — thanks to its resiliency factor.

Conclusion

What can I say? I'm a sucker for aerobatic aircraft. Just about every kind, from the Edge to the Yak and anything in between, has made its way through the Monasterio Hangar. Now, I'm glad this Extra 300 has made its way, too. It's nimble, it's sports aerobatics at its best, it's all-too-powerful — and, for the most part, it bounces like rubber.

The Parkzone Extra 300 is a good value for what you get. It comes with everything but your favorite transmitter, and it can be assembled in mere minutes (a new dad such as yours truly finds this kind of time-saving extremely appealing). In the air, it performs quite well, doing any kind of sport maneuver you throw at it, and it looks quite pleasing as it cuts its way through the air.

A WORD OF THANKS

I would like to thank the following for making this review possible: Horizon Hobby for providing the bind-and-fly version of this aircraft; and my good friend and fellow author Andy Grose for the stellar photography and video included in this review.

Pros:

  • It's a well-priced aircraft, whether pruchased BNF or PNP.
  • Great flying characteristics: Sporty yet docile, spunky yet tamable.
  • The Z-foam construction makes it rigid enough for any kind of aerobatics, while at the same time durable enough for any kind of ground encounter.
  • The included electronics are great, from the digital servo to the powerful motor and the all-too-reliable Spektrum AR500 receiver.
  • Great gliding characteristics for such an aerobatic plane.
  • Flies like a bigger plane, yet can be tossed around a soccer field without any problems.

Cons:

  • A bit heavy (34 ounces) for my tastes — but that's the price to pay for extra durability.
  • Color scheme is too similar for both top and bottom and can lead to disorientation. The paint also chips off a bit too easily.

Neutrals:

  • Some wings (including the ones I received) appear to have a bit of airfoil distortion caused during the molding process. Horizon has acknowledged the issue, however, and while the flying performance was not (at least to me) noticeable, it's still something that I hope is rectified with subsequent production runs.

Last edited by Spackles94; Aug 24, 2010 at 08:26 PM..

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Old Sep 09, 2010, 10:22 PM
Lost a wing? KNIFE EDGE
Hobbyzoneflyer's Avatar
United States, CA, Newport Beach
Joined Jun 2006
113 Posts
*clap clap clap* Fantastic Job! Great review. Want one but really would prefer something that can handle a hover. Gonna have to stick with the Slick!
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Old Sep 09, 2010, 11:47 PM
We shall serve the Lord
kingsflyer's Avatar
United States, TX, Kingsland
Joined Sep 2005
5,105 Posts
Great Review Napo. I have to agree with you that this one is a keeper.

However, it took me a while to get my Extra to that point. My first flights were OK, but I had a lot of trouble with my landings. The plane seemed to want to snap out of the air on landings. I tried the upside down wing arrangement and it helped a little, but orientation was even worse with the checker pattern on top. Finally I saw the correction on the CG location. I had been flying with the CG at the 3-1/4" location. I moved my battery all the way forward and got my CG to 2-3/4" and I've been a happy camper ever since. I may try moving it back a little sometime in the future, but not too soon.

Have you tried flat spins yet? Mine does a wonderful flat spin! I recovers as soon as you neutralize the controls.

I like the Extra so much that I now recommend it as the next step after the T28 Trojan. It is a great aerobatic trainer and will teach you orientation and recovery skills that you will need before you start flying 3D.

McD
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 05:56 AM
Fly Low-Fly 3D-Fly Often
SalamSyed's Avatar
United States, DC, Washington
Joined Oct 2009
5,566 Posts
Napo, nice and fair review I would say. Glad you mentioned most of the things people have discussed here at RCG about this plane.

I am sure Horizon have sent you the best available wings from their lot. You hope the issue gets resolved, I hoped that too but I do not trust them anymore like I did. I still have this plane which I do not fly. Some people asked me to sell it to them ($100-120) but I do not want to do to them what Horizon did to its loyal customers.

All the best and keep up the good work.

Salam
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 08:26 AM
War Eagle!
Spackles94's Avatar
Birmingham, Alabama
Joined Feb 2007
7,876 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobbyzoneflyer View Post
*clap clap clap* Fantastic Job! Great review. Want one but really would prefer something that can handle a hover. Gonna have to stick with the Slick!
Thanks! Glad you liked it!

I own a Slick, too, and it's a completely different plane. I love my Slick for 3D and low-and-slow flying — and this is the opposite. It's certainly a sports-aerobatic plane, and it will fly fast. It's no better or worse — it's just what it is.

But one thing's for sure. The Extra bounces a whole lot better than the Slick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsflyer View Post
Great Review Napo. I have to agree with you that this one is a keeper.

...

I like the Extra so much that I now recommend it as the next step after the T28 Trojan. It is a great aerobatic trainer and will teach you orientation and recovery skills that you will need before you start flying 3D.

McD
Thanks pal! Yeah, it's a good third/fourth plane. Glad you're enjoying yours! Didn't know you had bought one.

Funny about the landings, though — I, far from a landing master, seem to have very little trouble with them. But I'm terrible at landing with other planes that people just have no issues with. Go figure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SalamSyed View Post
Napo, nice and fair review I would say. Glad you mentioned most of the things people have discussed here at RCG about this plane.

I am sure Horizon have sent you the best available wings from their lot. You hope the issue gets resolved, I hoped that too but I do not trust them anymore like I did. I still have this plane which I do not fly. Some people asked me to sell it to them ($100-120) but I do not want to do to them what Horizon did to its loyal customers.

All the best and keep up the good work.

Salam
I appreciate it Salam! I have yet to read the discussions out there (I try to make a point to not look at them until the review is finished), but I have heard from fellow authors about the wing issue.

That said... I didn't get a hand-picked set of wings. My kit was shipped from the warehouse, just as if you had ordered it. No preferential treatment here. Trust me on that one. Otherwise my wings would have been perfect, and the LiPo cells within 0.01V of each other.
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 10:03 AM
Fly Low-Fly 3D-Fly Often
SalamSyed's Avatar
United States, DC, Washington
Joined Oct 2009
5,566 Posts
Napo, I trust you and respect the work that you do. All the best. :-)

In this pic, the wing is much better (rather fully symmetrical) than the one I have, could be that some are slightly better than others. Mine looks worse compared to this one.



Salam
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 10:19 AM
War Eagle!
Spackles94's Avatar
Birmingham, Alabama
Joined Feb 2007
7,876 Posts
Yeah, from what I've been told, it's hit-and-miss. Some get better sets, some get worse ones. I guess I got something in the middle.
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 11:32 AM
When's the next fly-in?
dee-grose's Avatar
Tanner, Alabama
Joined Oct 2003
6,439 Posts
First of all, great review, Napo. I really enjoyed flying that plane.

On the wing issue, from what I saw of Napo's plane, the left wing was more mis-shaped than the right one. But as has been stated over and over (and even by Mr. McConville himself), the flying characteristics of this plane are not affected by a slightly out-of-shape wing. It seems that CG and control throws are the things to watch on this bird.

Nice plane...and I still want one for myself!

Andy
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 11:55 AM
Park Stormer
United States, NJ, Brooklawn
Joined Jul 2008
824 Posts
A nice review. Seems scale in a lot of ways, what with needing lots of speed.

That said, I'm pretty sure full scale Extra 300's come with their wings made the right way though

All in all it seems like this plane won't be one of the greats from HH, like the trojan or super cub.
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 03:21 PM
Takeoff=Option Landing=Must
robusp's Avatar
USA, NY, Depew
Joined Jan 2009
818 Posts
Nice review. I wish I flew good enough to try all of the maneuvers Napo did.
Mine 300 didn't bounce as good as his, because it came down from lot higher and going WOT.
I was able to glue together the fuselage which was in 3 pieces. (replacement fuselage was not available yet in the stores) I even tried flipping the wings and it flew the same.
I take it with me every time I go flying (wings right side up), but I fly it only when is calm.
I love the aggressive look and snappy handling. I made up a 30mm spacer from piece of foam which I use for battery stop against firewall. I also added some black on the bottom of the elevator and wings for a better contrast between top and bottom.
This plane takes some to get used to. It requires my full concentration. After a session with it, I feel like I am flying a lot smoother with my T28 Trojan, F4F Wildcat, SU26 xp or even Cessna 182 Select.
In short, I am glad I bought it.
Rob
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 05:30 PM
The sky is my playground.
Dora Nine's Avatar
United States, NH
Joined May 2005
7,676 Posts
Great review. I may just have to pick one of these up for next years flying season.
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 08:11 PM
Air Cooled VW mechanic
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USA, CO, Longmont
Joined Jul 2008
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thanks for a beautifully written review.
Eric
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Old Sep 10, 2010, 09:29 PM
War Eagle!
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Birmingham, Alabama
Joined Feb 2007
7,876 Posts
Thanks for the kind words, folks!
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Old Sep 11, 2010, 12:02 AM
BadPilot
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United States, IL, Custer Park
Joined Nov 2007
1,706 Posts
Napo,

As usual, very nice review and Andy super fotos. I really enjoyed the detail description of the plane but most of all how it flies. This let me know what to expect when I purchase this plane.

Thank you

John
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Old Sep 11, 2010, 06:52 AM
When's the next fly-in?
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Tanner, Alabama
Joined Oct 2003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badpilotto View Post
Napo,

As usual, very nice review and Andy super fotos. I really enjoyed the detail description of the plane but most of all how it flies. This let me know what to expect when I purchase this plane.

Thank you

John
Thanks, John, but don't let Napo fool you. We shared in the photographing and video duties for that early-morning flying session. Rest assured that the best pictures are his work!

Still a fun plane. I really like the way it flies knife-edge. Inverted is fun too!

Andy
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