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Old Mar 18, 2015, 06:02 AM
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Splitter cable

I have this LED circle that I would like to fit under the my quad but I am not sure how to fit the wiring. I am going to fit a low-voltage capacitor to the axillary channel of my flight control board and would like to know if it is safe to use a splitter cable for the LED and capacitor? Is the white wire for a on/off switch?
John.
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Last edited by chunkyabc; Mar 18, 2015 at 12:39 PM.
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Old Mar 18, 2015, 10:15 PM
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That looks like a regular servo connector. If all three wires are used then the white would be a signal wire.

Not sure about your using a capacitor. A cap will only provide power for a very short time.

A little more info on the light itself, like working voltage, or even a link to it would help.

It could be self contained to work off a switch on your tx via the rx.
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Old Mar 19, 2015, 03:39 AM
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It's safe to use a splitter lead but, as Glacier Girl has said, the value of having a capacitor (presumably to maintain power when there's a momentary glitch in the power supply) is questionable. Much better to get a reliable power supply in the first place, such as a suitably rated stand-alone BEC, especially if your lights will be using 5v/6v power from the receiver.

It's impossible to know what the white wire is for without knowing more about the LED ring. Is it designed for 5v/6v supply, or is it 12v and they just used a servo plug for convenience? By normal RC standards the white lead should be a signal lead, presumably to allow you to switch it on/off, or to change its display mode, from your transmitter.
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Old Mar 19, 2015, 06:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacier Girl View Post
That looks like a regular servo connector. If all three wires are used then the white would be a signal wire.

Not sure about your using a capacitor. A cap will only provide power for a very short time.

A little more info on the light itself, like working voltage, or even a link to it would help.

It could be self contained to work off a switch on your tx via the rx.
The cap is for brown-outs, I just wanted to know if they can work together.
This is the link to the light.

https://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...ble_Modes.html
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Old Mar 19, 2015, 06:28 PM
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In the specs. on the Hobby King listing there is this line.

ON/OFF Control: PWM 760uS

I would assume that means that a signal from the receiver of more than that value will turn the lights on. So it looks like the white wire will be needed.
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Old Mar 19, 2015, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by abenn View Post
It's safe to use a splitter lead but, as Glacier Girl has said, the value of having a capacitor (presumably to maintain power when there's a momentary glitch in the power supply) is questionable. Much better to get a reliable power supply in the first place, such as a suitably rated stand-alone BEC, especially if your lights will be using 5v/6v power from the receiver.

It's impossible to know what the white wire is for without knowing more about the LED ring. Is it designed for 5v/6v supply, or is it 12v and they just used a servo plug for convenience? By normal RC standards the white lead should be a signal lead, presumably to allow you to switch it on/off, or to change its display mode, from your transmitter.
I have looked in google to try to understand what a BEC does but, I'm sorry, I can't understand what a 'stand alone BEC' is.
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Old Mar 19, 2015, 06:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Dubovsky View Post
In the specs. on the Hobby King listing there is this line.

ON/OFF Control: PWM 760uS

I would assume that means that a signal from the receiver of more than that value will turn the lights on. So it looks like the white wire will be needed.
Does that mean that it must have a channel of its own? If I've got that right then I can't use a splitter with the low-voltage capacitor?
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Old Mar 20, 2015, 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by chunkyabc View Post
I have looked in google to try to understand what a BEC does but, I'm sorry, I can't understand what a 'stand alone BEC' is.
A BEC is simply a voltage-reducer; it takes the voltage of your battery -- usually your motor battery -- and reduces it to 5v or 6v (sometimes adjustable) so that it can be used by your receiver and servos. In glow powered models, and in the early days of electric flight, we usually used a separate 4-cell or 5-cell (4.8v or 6.0v) NiMh battery to power the receiver and servos, so when the BEC was introduced it became known as the Battery Eliminator Circuit because it eliminates the need for a separate receiver battery.

Most speed controllers (ESCs) have a BEC built into them, so when you connect them to your receiver they're supplying 5v to it, as well as getting the throttle signal from it. A stand-alone BEC is simply one that's not built into an ESC, like these Castle Creations ones. They're used when the amps capability of the BEC built into the ESC is not enough for all your equipment, if the ESC doesn't have a built-in BEC, or if you simply feel safer knowing that an ESC failure isn't going to stop your model responding to controls. You normally connect them to your main battery, and plug them into a spare slot in your receiver. When using them you disable the BEC in your ESC (if it has one) by pulling the red wire out of its plug that goes to the receiver.

If your lights are controllable from your transmitter, they need to have their own channel with a switch assigned to it. You could, I suppose, Y-lead them with your ESC, in which case they would switch on when the throttle stick passes 50% -- or they might switch off when it passes 50%.
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Old Mar 20, 2015, 05:55 AM
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There should be no problem using a wye cable on the aux channel for the capacitor and the light unit. the cap only uses the positive and negative rails. It would not bother the light unit.

The extra resistance of the wye cable may reduce the effectiveness of the capacitor. I don't really think you need one on a multirotor. There are no servos connected to the control board anyway, and those are what may cause a current surge that would cause a brownout.
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Old Mar 20, 2015, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike Dubovsky View Post
There should be no problem using a wye cable on the aux channel for the capacitor and the light unit. the cap only uses the positive and negative rails. It would not bother the light unit.

The extra resistance of the wye cable may reduce the effectiveness of the capacitor. I don't really think you need one on a multirotor. There are no servos connected to the control board anyway, and those are what may cause a current surge that would cause a brownout.
Now THAT is interesting! So I may not need the capacitor at all! The ESCs I have state: BEC:2A. Do you think I can use this LED light safely on the aux channel?

https://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/...ble_Modes.html
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Old Mar 20, 2015, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by abenn View Post
A BEC is simply a voltage-reducer; it takes the voltage of your battery -- usually your motor battery -- and reduces it to 5v or 6v (sometimes adjustable) so that it can be used by your receiver and servos. In glow powered models, and in the early days of electric flight, we usually used a separate 4-cell or 5-cell (4.8v or 6.0v) NiMh battery to power the receiver and servos, so when the BEC was introduced it became known as the Battery Eliminator Circuit because it eliminates the need for a separate receiver battery.

Most speed controllers (ESCs) have a BEC built into them, so when you connect them to your receiver they're supplying 5v to it, as well as getting the throttle signal from it. A stand-alone BEC is simply one that's not built into an ESC, like these Castle Creations ones. They're used when the amps capability of the BEC built into the ESC is not enough for all your equipment, if the ESC doesn't have a built-in BEC, or if you simply feel safer knowing that an ESC failure isn't going to stop your model responding to controls. You normally connect them to your main battery, and plug them into a spare slot in your receiver. When using them you disable the BEC in your ESC (if it has one) by pulling the red wire out of its plug that goes to the receiver.

If your lights are controllable from your transmitter, they need to have their own channel with a switch assigned to it. You could, I suppose, Y-lead them with your ESC, in which case they would switch on when the throttle stick passes 50% -- or they might switch off when it passes 50%.
Thank you for the detailed explanation. The ESCs I have are Velotech Magic with a BEC:2A. So if these are okay, do YOU think I can use the aux channel for this LED? Mike Dubousky tells me that I probably don't need a capacitor.
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Old Mar 20, 2015, 03:24 PM
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Your link in post #10 doesn't work for me, but similar lights on the HK page show a current draw of 30mA when lit, and they work on 3.3v to 5.5v supply, so I would plug them straight into an AUX channel without any worries.

Who has suggested that you need a capacitor? If the power consumption of your receiver and auxiliaries is so close to the BEC rating that you think you need some protection against "brown-outs", then I would go for a stand-alone BEC instead. If your quad doesn't have a camera gymbal or any other gizmos powered from the receiver, then the 2A BEC in your ESC should be plenty. I don't see that a capacitor is going to give you any real protection, for it can only supply power for a split second. A capacitor is generally used where there's a need to smooth out short-term fluctuations in the voltage, which I don't see as being relevant in your case.
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Old Mar 21, 2015, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by abenn View Post
Your link in post #10 doesn't work for me, but similar lights on the HK page show a current draw of 30mA when lit, and they work on 3.3v to 5.5v supply, so I would plug them straight into an AUX channel without any worries.

Who has suggested that you need a capacitor? If the power consumption of your receiver and auxiliaries is so close to the BEC rating that you think you need some protection against "brown-outs", then I would go for a stand-alone BEC instead. If your quad doesn't have a camera gymbal or any other gizmos powered from the receiver, then the 2A BEC in your ESC should be plenty. I don't see that a capacitor is going to give you any real protection, for it can only supply power for a split second. A capacitor is generally used where there's a need to smooth out short-term fluctuations in the voltage, which I don't see as being relevant in your case.
Sorry about the link, it worked earlier. The LED is 3.3v-5.5v and I'm not using a camera so I'll go ahead with the aux channel without the capacitor. Thank you sooo much for your help and information, it is invaluable.
John.
PS. I read on one of the other forums that you needed a cap but he must have had a lot of stuff on his quad.
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Old Mar 31, 2015, 01:55 PM
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Transmitter binding

Hello, It me, in trouble again. My 'Tilt' is built and is binding to the transmitter. But, it does not arm and the motors don't move. I think it must be the transmitter as I am having trouble understanding how to set it up. I have watched numerous tutorial on you tube but can't find the one that can explain how to setup a DX6 for a quad-copter. Can anyone help, I'm pulling my hair out.
John.
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Old Mar 31, 2015, 02:27 PM
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ESCs not arming often means that you haven't calibrated them. This is done by taking the props off the motors, switching on the transmitter and setting the throttle to maximum, then powering up the quad. When the ESCs beep (what tones depends on what brand ESC) you then set the throttle down to minimum, usually within 2 seconds or so, and you get another set of beeps.

Flight controllers not arming often means that one or more of the transmitter stick ranges is not set up correctly. Hopefully someone with experience of your setup (what flight controller is it, by the way?) will be able to chip in and point you in the right direction.
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