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Old Feb 04, 2012, 10:10 AM
Herk
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Virginia USA
Joined Jun 2007
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I'm not monitoring this particular discussion, but I do have some relevant news that is probably of interest to some who are participating here.

Michael Selig has now posted downloadable versions of his low speed wind tunnel studies on his website at the University of Illinois.

http://www.ae.illinois.edu/m-selig/uiuc_lsat.html

Also included there are other publications and reports that would be of interest to designers.
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Old Feb 04, 2012, 04:42 PM
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Sydney
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Thanks Herk - very interesting to catch up with the results of Selig's later work. Certainly worth adding to your list pants.
John
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Old Feb 04, 2012, 11:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lincoln View Post
This paper is kind of fun, but is probably not the place to start:
http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930081303
Try searching for Prandtl old papers here:
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp
LOTS of other interesting stuff on NTRS if you poke around. Also, some of the British aeronautic sites have fun stuff, for instance, about delta wings and conical camber.
Classic stuff, and not entirely obscure. You might also try a web search for some of Ilan Kroo's stuff at Stanford.

I suppose these may not be terribly basic, although one might argue that Prandtl is basic as in supporting lots of more advanced stuff. Dover Publications often has classic texts reprinted for cheap. One is "Theory of Wing Sections".

I seem to recall there are TWO Martin Simons aero books. I once ordered the simpler one by mistake. The more complicated one may not be totally crammed with equations, but it has quite a few, and I find it has reasonably clear explanations.

If you can find a library with Kitplanes magazine, Barnaby Wainfan's articles can be educational and interesting, though usually not terribly challenging. Not sure if it's on line, but his lecture to TWITT on the Facetmobile is quite entertaining. (TWITT sells a tape but it is certainly not free.)

There are probably a few classic texts I'm not aware of. However, I liked Timoshenko's Strength of Materials books, parts 1 and 2. Not sure what they'd be like without instruction, though. Also, Thomas and Finney for Calculus. These may have to be from the library, though, as they are probably expensive. On the other hand, maybe the older editions can be obtained used.
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If you're looking to design and build stuff, you really know what you want, and have a lot of self discipline, then MIT may be worth investigating. At least if it's anything like it used to be as far as lab stuff goes. For instance, some students from there gave our RC club a presentation on the solar RC aircraft they made that stayed up for many hours without batteries, just on the immediate current for the cells. If it's still there, they have an aero workshop that always has a bunch of wind tunnel models being constructed, and perhaps they still have some parts from Daedelus lying around, plus the old foam cutter. (Hmmm... it's been a LONG time, maybe not. A better user interface would be nice.) A couple of people I met managed to build airplanes in the Hobby Shop. I was at an airport some years ago, looking for someone's dropped tow line (full scale) and looked up to see one of these airplanes landing!

I understand the place is less monastic than it used to be, but I'm sure you would still need lots of focus and energy.
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You might want to think early about what you are willing to do and not do. Depending on your politics, anyway. I think there's a fair amount of aerospace R&D in weapons that goes into projects some people might consider objectionable.

If you are really serious, you might ask mitkid on RC groups for advice. Best to do some homework first so he knows you're for real. I think he's at Aurora or at least some place that makes really amazing UAV's.

It's not exactly highly technical, but you may find William Lengeweiche's "Stick and Rudder" interesting. Or, at least, everyone seems to like it. I kind of dropped it as it all seemed rather familiar after flying RC for many years and being an airplane nut. But likely you can find it in your local library or library network.
Wow, that's a lot of information. Thank you very much.

To answer your question, I would like to specialize in defense, if that is what you are asking. Employment at companies such as Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, Boeing, Northrop, is definitely a goal of mine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fnnwizard View Post
Without paying 5 or 6 digits there is nothing better than this. Not very well known, but MIT, yes the MIT that Dr. Drela teaches at offers most of their actual classes for free via the web. Its a program they call MIT OPENCOURSEWARE (OCW)

http://search.mit.edu/search?site=oc...G.x=0&btnG.y=0
I had heard of that but I wasn't certain if they had any material pertaining to aerospace. I'm watching them a we speak. Haha.

Quote:
Originally Posted by toxic-trip View Post
YouArePants if you decide on going to the University of Arizona let me know. I encourage people to build/design anything from free-flight gliders to large composite aircraft through the club I run at U of A. Anyone can get good/high GPA in your studies, it is the creativity, dedication, and people you know that will get you far in your studies/workplace (only to a certain degree though).

Thanks,
Josh
Really? Cool! I was just there on January 28th for the UA Up Close tour and I visited the AIAA lab and saw their rockets and small planes. It really was neat. Is that the club you are associated with? I am very interested in joining your club if I do end up being accepted, and I plan on attending the summer engineering program (pending acceptance, of course) this summer at the school. I eagerly await my opportunity to attend UA, they have quite the staff organizing these tours.
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Old Feb 05, 2012, 10:21 AM
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USA, AZ, Tucson
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Do you live in Phoenix or Tucson right now? I am with the Aerial Robotics Club, we share a lab with AIAA, the back part of the room (near the windows) was our stuff, all the planes in the room except 1 or 2 are ours. I am also a part of AIAA, they are a more professional acclaimed club, but they still build a few things (mostly rockets). ARC on the other hand builds anything from foam chuck gliders converted to radio control (for new members), to gas (petrol) helicopters, to composite autonomous drones.

AIAA does have a lot more support because it has 120+ members and 40+ active members, we are a smaller club because we have 30+ members and ~8 active members. We are doing our best to get the word out to the local community and to the U of A about our club so that we can have more opportunities for funding, recruiting, etc.
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Old Feb 05, 2012, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toxic-trip View Post
Do you live in Phoenix or Tucson right now? I am with the Aerial Robotics Club, we share a lab with AIAA, the back part of the room (near the windows) was our stuff, all the planes in the room except 1 or 2 are ours. I am also a part of AIAA, they are a more professional acclaimed club, but they still build a few things (mostly rockets). ARC on the other hand builds anything from foam chuck gliders converted to radio control (for new members), to gas (petrol) helicopters, to composite autonomous drones.

AIAA does have a lot more support because it has 120+ members and 40+ active members, we are a smaller club because we have 30+ members and ~8 active members. We are doing our best to get the word out to the local community and to the U of A about our club so that we can have more opportunities for funding, recruiting, etc.
I'm actually in the Pinetop-Lakeside area. So it is possible to be member of both clubs, then? I would like to participate in both.
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