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Old Aug 20, 2012, 02:17 PM
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I am a newbie in this forum.I have great affinity for Remote Controlled vehicles since childhood.What branch of engineering should I opt for in order to know about remote controlled signals in details.
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Old Aug 20, 2012, 02:39 PM
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If you want to know the inner workings of all the electronics and the science behind them, then electrical engineering is probably what you want.

Before you jump into a bachelor's program, make sure you've got all your ducks in a row though. I had a hell of a time with Calc 1 because of a very bad algebra teacher in high school... it cost me a lot of money to recover from that mistake and finally get on the right path toward my degree in aerospace engineering. It would have done me good to get Algebra, Calc I, and Chemistry from a community college before going to a 4 year school.

Solid understanding of algebra, trig and geometry is a must as is a real determination to do well in the fundamental classes. Go to class (nobody realizes how tempting it is to skip til they get to college), take lots of notes, study hard and work with other people to understand all concepts in the homework.
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Old Aug 20, 2012, 03:24 PM
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@progmateur - as ChillPhatCat said - engineering is a lot of math. i have an electrical engineering degree and i worked hard to earn it. its 3/4 math and 1/4 physics. a lot of theoretical work comes in before you do application.

@ChillPhatCat - saw your location. i went to SU incidentally - did you go there too?
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Old Aug 20, 2012, 04:42 PM
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I just finished up my work at Buffalo. We are big SU fans though, lots of family members have graduated from there.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 02:07 AM
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Originally Posted by ChillPhatCat View Post
If you want to know the inner workings of all the electronics and the science behind them, then electrical engineering is probably what you want.

Before you jump into a bachelor's program, make sure you've got all your ducks in a row though. I had a hell of a time with Calc 1 because of a very bad algebra teacher in high school... it cost me a lot of money to recover from that mistake and finally get on the right path toward my degree in aerospace engineering. It would have done me good to get Algebra, Calc I, and Chemistry from a community college before going to a 4 year school.

Solid understanding of algebra, trig and geometry is a must as is a real determination to do well in the fundamental classes. Go to class (nobody realizes how tempting it is to skip til they get to college), take lots of notes, study hard and work with other people to understand all concepts in the homework.

Thanks Sir for your reply.Actually I am undergoing a bachelors degree in computer science ( Honors 1st year),even I have to have my calculus lessons pretty fast.Please refer me some books for a hardened knowledge of Alzebra calc coordinate and trig.

Moreover Sir,I find electronics very fascinating and interesting,but lack in electrical knowledge.Please help me through it.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 07:42 AM
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I can't really recommend any algebra books since I took that course a long long time ago... you should really consider taking a course in linear algebra some time in your college career though, it is very useful.

I also am not the one to ask about electronics, I barely scraped by in electrical circuits and it's probably just the fact that the teacher liked me that I managed a B-. I took most of my core classes the first time I went to college 10 years ago, then completed the high level courses over the last 3 years to finally get my bachelors.

Sounds like cmdl is better knowledged in the branch you're interested in... I'm assuming you just want some books on the subject and don't plan to pursue a degree in EE? Computer science will at least give you all the background you need to understand most engineering texts.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 07:53 AM
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And when the prints are all drawn and given the okay, the Pipefitters, electricians, iron workers, go through them and try to explain why it wont work that way I feel that before anyone gets a degree they should put 4 or 5 years into building the stuff in the field.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 08:03 AM
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One of my professors suggested that as soon as you get a job as an engineer at a company, go down to the floor and make friends with the machinists/operators because they probably know the process better than any of the engineers.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 08:33 AM
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If you want to learn about electronics, I recommend "The Art of Electronics" by Paul Horowitz. It goes from the basics of DC circuits to advanced microprocessors. You don't even have to read through the whole book(It is over 1,000 pages) to learn a lot. I've only read a few chapters and increased my knowledge immensely.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 08:47 AM
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As a "mechanic" in my field, master shipwright and carpenter I know exactly the won't work as it's drawn scenario. I always felt that these guys need to be in our shoes in the field. A few years back I met a civil engineer who I did some work for that was from Germany. He told me that in Germany that in order to get a degree in for instance civil engineering that you first must learn a trade, in his case, bricklayer. He said that way you have a construction background and understanding of real world situations. The guy actually laid every brick by himself when we built him a new home after Katrina! Dave/zeezee
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 09:21 AM
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"machinists/operators because they probably know the process better than any of the engineers. "

After my service, then back to school. I got a job in a research and development facility that did everything themselves, because what they needed was not manufactured. The most valuable education I got was working in the machine shop, and learning from their machinist how to do/operate all of their machinery. Then I was able to design for "making" not just fantasy.

Les
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 09:55 AM
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If you want to learn about electronics start playing with Heath kits and Arduinos. You can learn more from 1 year of doing than 2 years of sitting in a classroom.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 09:57 AM
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progmateur, i graduated in 1997 and haven't been in the engineering field since 2000 so unfortunately i can't recommend any books either. i can recommend that you go to class websites (pick a university) and see what professor's have prescribed there. however, seems like Wehrdo already has a suggestion for you.
then again, how in-depth do you want to get? zeezee and LesUyeda have good advice when it comes to application - such as the rc field. whereas college courses will put you a lot more on the theoretical than the empirical side of it.
computer science majors at SU took the same calculus classes as us and then some boolean algebra, discrete choice math, etc. differential equations and matrix algebra were where i only recall seeing electrical and computer engineers in the classes with me so those may be some you can brush up on. but then if you want to go with more conceptual learning you may be better off asking on an academic forum just so that you have more people able to help you with that. of course it all comes down to if you're looking for more theoretical or empirical learning.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 01:19 PM
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Are you interested in how things work or actually obtaining an EE degree? Before 2.4G, it was pretty much all hardware and fairly straightforward. Granted, RF is something of a black art. 2.4G is a part of a tech evolution that is much more systems/software, dealing with protocol stacks rather than transistors & voltages.

Googling "radio control circuits" yields many results that you can inform yourself with.

Having been in the industry for decades and worked on analog, digital, photonics, software, & hardware, I have had extremely little use of calculus and transforms despite all the classes. Most of the officers in major tech companies don't have a really technical background either - though they may believe they do.
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Old Aug 21, 2012, 02:09 PM
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Thanks for the enormous amount o responce that I am getting from this forum and thanks to you personally Sir,(Chilphatcat)

Actually I am planning to opt for EE after Bachelors..And signal processing (and anything related to signals) is what Im particularly interested in...@moyg
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