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Old Dec 27, 2012, 07:11 PM
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Help!
Blade Nano CP X Troubleshooting - Tips and Tricks

Since the other nano thread is being inudated with questions and problems with this tiny bird, we need to start a separate thread.

From Brian James, Horizon Hobby product development:

Guys, here are some tips from us here in Product Development. We've found that the Nano CP X is pretty darn durable, but if you crash, there is always the possibility that a part gets damaged. Below are some helpful tips if you are experiencing problems.

Nano CP X Tips & Tricks

Spindle when installing a replacement spindle, ensure that there is no in and out play and the grips are able to rotate freely. Do not over tighten. Put a small dab of white glue or rubber cement on the spindle nut.

Vibrations If you are having bad vibrations and/or blades are out of track caused by crash damage, replace the spindle.

Main Gear If you need to replace the main gear as a result from crash damage, ensure that you apply a small amount of easily removable glue such as white glue or rubber cement.

Collar on main shaft If the collar on the main shaft has shifted position caused by crash damage, it needs to be secured 18.83mm from the top of the main shaft using an adhesive such as CA.

Motor If you need to replace the motor, you will need to apply a small dab of glue to prevent it from slipping. We recommend white glue or rubber cement.

Break-in The main motor, tail motor, and included lipos need a few flights to break-in. During the break-in period, you may get a little tail wag, and the overall flight power/performance may be slightly lower than expected. As you get more flights on the helicopter, the motors and battery performance will increase.

Batteries Do not use anything less than 25C batteries on the helicopter, the performance will suffer greatly otherwise.

Swashplate linkage lengths 25mm

Main blades should be kept loose for best performance. The fast flight blades provide more stability than the hi-performance blades. The hi-performance blades may cause the helicopter to exhibit a slight wobble when the model is "unloaded".

Binding procedure is the same as the mCP X V2
o Computer binding instructions
http://www.horizonhobby.com/pdf/BLH3...structions.pdf
o DX4E and DX5E binding instructions (Page 7 of the manual)
http://www.horizonhobby.com/pdf/BLH3600-Manual_EN.pdf
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 07:12 PM
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I've come up with an outline that can help tune the spindle and blade grips:

To help compensate blade balancing & lead/ lag:

Tight spindle, tight grips = YES/ NO
Tight spindle, loose grips = YES/ NO
Loose spindle, tight grips = YES/ NO
Loose spindle, loose grips = YES/ NO

The above outline is defined as such -

The tight spindle means zero play but no ratcheting feeling from the blade grip bearings when they're tested for free movement, and the loose spindle means HH's 1mm amount of play as they suggest. The tight blade grips means that the blades are tight enough, so when the heli is held on its side, the blades stay straight until a gentle drop while holding it by the main gear makes the blades flop down. Loose grips mean that the blades will flop on their own when the heli is held on its side.



I'm also in the middle of getting my blades to track properly. I used a paintbrush and some acrylic red and blue paint to make a stripe of red on one end of the blade and blue on the other. Colored Sharpie markers can work just as well, and they both clean up and can be removed easily with some rubbing alcohol and some cotton balls, paper towels, etc.

I'll spool up the head on the heli, and get the pitch to 50%, and look straight at the heli from the sides, front, or back, and watch the rotor disk (the blurry circle the blades make) and look for the red and blue colors. If one color is high, and the other is low, I'd then stop and take the blades off, and slightly bend the high blade where the blade meets the blade root slightly down, and then do the opposite to the low one. I'd then put them back on, and re-test, & repeat until the two colors meet and make a new color; in this case purple.

I've done that many times before, and even on my FP birds in the past, and I can see a better difference in performance every time.


Hope any of these things help! If you have a tip or trick to help tune up the nCP X - please post it here!!!
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 07:34 PM
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Tail Wag

If the tail wags, check for the following:
  1. Cracked boom
  2. Bent tail rotor/ tail motor shaft
  3. Boom is not fully seated in the main frame
  4. Main gear has slipped down on the shaft
  5. Boom wires are touching something conductive
  6. Improper head set-up (something's too tight or too loose)
  7. Main blades are not balanced or tracking properly

Use some thin CA to seal the end of the boom, and the flat as well, to prevent the end from cracking and splitting.
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 07:48 PM
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Modding KBDD skids to fit the nCP X

Modding the KBDD mCPX skids for the Blade nCP X

Modding the KBDD mCPX skids for the Blade nCP X part 2
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 08:06 PM
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Main motor & main gear

Main motor:
A common problem I've been noticing from some is that they are putting oil in the 2 holes in the plastic endbell on the main.

That's an early death sentence for the motor, b/c the brushes and comm will get contaminated with the oil, collect dust from the brushes, and gum up, putting scratches in the comm, etc. When it heats up, the brushes will also start to break apart from the fouled comm. It's really no different from an rc car's brushed pro stock motor when bearing oil accidentally gets in the endbell and fouls the comm & brushes. In this case, the brushes are very small, and fouling will kill them rather quickly.

If the main motor needs any oil, use a toothpick or exacto knife and apply a tiny drop of oil to the output shaft - the capillary action of bearing oil will seep into the bushing. Wipe away any excess oil.

Main Gear:
The main gear should be flush up against the lower bearing in the frame, with zero amount of vertical play. Test this by holding the anti-rotation forks on the rotor hub, and try and move it up and down. If the shaft collar moves up away from the top bearing, then the gear has slipped down. Place the heli upside down and using a flat tip screwdriver, drive the gear straight down towards the rotor hub, all the while keeping the frame straight up and down. Re-glue the gear with PVA glue or rubber cement such as Shoe Goo. Routinely clean it with a cheap toothbrush and some plastic-friendly cleaner, such as Simple Green. Rubbing alcohol works, too. If the gear gets damaged in a crash, and some teeth are gnashed or missing, replace.
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 08:29 PM
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Main blades

After a crash, check out the blades real quick to see if there are any cracks, dents, or tiny chips/ chunks missing from them. If they get chewed up enough, this will throw the balance off and cause violent vibrations. If that's the case, discard them and fit a new set on, maintaining the same grip tension they had before the crash.

Also, the blades can bend, warp,or twist resulting from a crash. This could cause the blades to be out of track. They can be tested by placing them on a smooth and ultra-flat surface such as a small mirror or piece of glass. Lay the blades on this surface, and using your finger, push down on the length of the blade, and any warps, twists or bends will become visible. They can be straightened using hot tap water. Run the water over the blades for at least 1 minute, and then hold the blade root and slowly bend it back to shape, a little at a time. Re-check the flatness of it on the glass or mirror, and repeat until they become as flat as possible again. Do not use a heat gun, soldering iron, or cigarette lighter to speed up the heating process - as that will surely destroy them.
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Old Dec 27, 2012, 08:48 PM
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Feathering spindle

After a crash, the feathering spindle can bend. One symptom of a bent spindle is a constant wobble coming from the center of the aircraft.

There's two ways to check if the spindle is bent. The 1st way is the quick way, but sometimes will not show that it is slightly bent. It only shows if the threaded end and nut is badly bent, or the spindle itself is badly bent.

The 1st method:
Make the grip tension loose enough so that the blades will flop when the heli is held on its side. Remove one of the blades, and insert the fs tool into the grip. Rotate the tool, and check to see if the blade opposite swings side to side. This indicates that the spindle is badly damaged, and will need a full replacement.

The 2nd method:
Remove the blades, and pop the rotor links off the grips. remove the fs using the tools, and inspect the nut and threads to ensure that they screw together straight. Using the same small mirror or piece of glass, place the fs with the head sticking over the glass, and tilt the glass to make it move. If the fs does not roll downward, then it's got a small bend in it, which can be enough to create problems with the rotor balance. Replace the spindle if this is the case.

Some have had success straightening the fs by rolling it against the edge of a hard, straight surface, such as the straight edge of a table or granite countertop. This may work, but over time repeating this, the metal will weaken, and the fs may just snap and send the blades off like projectiles, so take heed and care if you attempt this.
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Old Dec 29, 2012, 08:22 PM
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Blade grips

Routinely inspect the grips for cracks, wear, and binding. The grips commonly crack and split on the top or on the sides. The side crack can be less evident, so if the heli starts to have problems flying after a crash, this is something to check out. Apply gentle pressure and pull the grip ends away from each other, and this will make any side cracks apparent. If the grips are binding in any way, pop the bearings out with the end of a paper clip, clean them with an appropiate cleaner, re-oil, ensure they roll smoothly, and seat them properly back into place (the fs tool can be used to seat the inner bearings). Replace any worn out, cracked, or damaged grips.

Try to save good grips - if only one is bad, then put the good one aside in the spares lot, and if another single grip gets damaged, then there will be a used 2nd set that's still in good shape.

Others beside myself choose to use blue thread locking compound such as Loctite to secure the nut end on the feathering spindle. This is okay to do, but we all need to know exactly how to apply the thread lock without ruining the bearings inside the grip, and the plastic as well. I decided to put this procedure in the blade grip section because doing it wrong will seize the bearings, and may also craze the plastic parts if it's not done right.

Method 1:
  1. Using the fs tool, assemble the spindle, grip, step washer, and damper into the rotor hub. Push on the fs tool so that the threaded end sticks all the way out of the hub.
  2. Now, before assembling the rest of the head, take the time to add the thread locking compound in this step. Add a small drop of the thread lock to the flat side of a hobby knife, and apply it to the threads. Be sure to give it an even coat, and wipe away any excess that may creep on the smooth surface of the spindle itself. Let the thread lock dry thoroughly according to the instructions on the bottle.
  3. After the thread lock has dried, finish the assembly of the rest of the rotor head.

Method 2:
  1. Rempve both baldes from their grips.
  2. Locate the fs nut inside the blade grip, and then tilt the model on its side, turning the nut side of the grips to the bottom.
  3. Using the same application technique, use a tiny amount of thread lock and touch the threads on the spindle and the outside face of the nut, keeping the model tilted on its side, so that none of the thread lock will seep into the grip's bearing.
  4. place the model on its side, with the nut side down to let the thread lock dry completely.
  5. Attach the main blades back onto their grips.

Any thread lock that accidentally drips onto any plastic parts should be immediately cleaned up with a cotton swab or cotton ball and rubbing alcohol to avoid any crazing.

With either method used, this should be performed only once. I cannot stress this enough; adding thread lock a 2nd time will make the nut too hard to remove, and this can strip out the fs head and/ or the fs tools. Remember - the threads are very tiny, and does not need much to secure it! Applying it once should last the life of the spindle, unless the thread lock is removed while cleaning it. Another thing I can't caution enough about is the amount of thread lock to be used. Half of a full drop is more than enough. In fact, a gentle squeeze on the bottle will start to form a drop, and as that drop just starts to take shape, touch it to the hobby knife and then pull the bottle away.
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Old Dec 30, 2012, 12:34 AM
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I find it much easier to apply thread lock to the inside threads of small parts. For a FS like the Nano's, put it inside the nut. For one like the mCPX, put it inside the shaft. I use a bent-out paper clip to apply it. Since it's inside, there's virtually no chance for any to run or squeeze out onto plastic parts or bearings.
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Old Dec 30, 2012, 04:59 PM
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I have always used a toothpick to apply locktight. Also There is no need for an even, all around the threads coat, one dab anywhere around the threads is all you need.
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Old Dec 30, 2012, 08:25 PM
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I think this is a waste. I wouldn't want to fly a nano all clugged together this way (extra weight). I have 255 flights on my nano and many hard crashes. I still have unbroken original landing skids, tail boom and canopy although, canopy has been repaired with shoe goo many times. As has been said many times before, fly over grass and use throttle hold.
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Old Dec 30, 2012, 08:35 PM
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ugh.... just discovered a problem with starting out with the DX4e and then using a computer TX.... Was flying in the kitchen and got a little close to the cookbook shelf, so I hit throttle hold, the heli hit the bookcase and flopped to the floor.... and then started making a weird noise... I picked it up and it spooled up to nearly full throttle.... Looked at my TX and then realized I had hit the flightmode switch, (switching it from normal to Stunt 1), which of course on a "normal" tx is in the same place as "throttle hold" on the DX4e..... grrrrr.... Luckily, it doesn't seem like any damage was done.... Just something to think about...
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Old Jan 01, 2013, 06:26 AM
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Something has come out of the blade grip on one side more than the other, not sure how to reinsert, please could someone advise?

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Description: Left shaft is out more than right!
Thanks
Jim
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Old Jan 01, 2013, 06:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcjim11 View Post
Something has come out of the blade grip on one side more than the other, not sure how to reinsert, please could someone advise?

Attachment 5412238
Thanks
Jim
The feathering spindle in the rotor hub is what keeps that screwed in and balanced. There are two tools included in the kit that help that out.

From what you're saying, I want to help - take the main blades off, and pop the top links off. Use the feathering spindle tools, and un-screw it off, and make sure that the little nut gets captured inside one of those tools.

Set that all aside, and take apart the whole head off the rotor hub.

There should only be these parts -
2 hard rubber o-ring dampers
2 step washers, bronze or brass in type
the feathering spindle
the sindle nut (captured inside the tool)

Then, there's the blade grips - clean them up and remove any junk that may stick inside.

Re-assemble them, according to Marcus's video online at Blade, and hopefully, you should be good to go!
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Old Jan 01, 2013, 06:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dacaur View Post
ugh.... just discovered a problem with starting out with the DX4e and then using a computer TX.... Was flying in the kitchen and got a little close to the cookbook shelf, so I hit throttle hold, the heli hit the bookcase and flopped to the floor.... and then started making a weird noise... I picked it up and it spooled up to nearly full throttle.... Looked at my TX and then realized I had hit the flightmode switch, (switching it from normal to Stunt 1), which of course on a "normal" tx is in the same place as "throttle hold" on the DX4e..... grrrrr.... Luckily, it doesn't seem like any damage was done.... Just something to think about...
The DX4e is a "starter" radio to get everyone up and flying. I have heard many, many problems about it, and can only point everyone to Horizon Hobby's tech support. Sorry - I didn't design it, and never used it. Please ask the techs for help on this issue. The problems are too vast and many.. Please call their toll free number on this issue.
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