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Old Nov 21, 2012, 08:39 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
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First true scratch build: thruxton jackaroo. And a couple Q's

So, first off this will be my first true scratch build, meaning no plans, etc. I have built two balsa free flight models models from kits and I want to try my hand at a total scratchbuild. So, I was trying to think of a plane to build, and I thought of the first plane I ever flew in, and that was a thruxton jackaroo. This was at the Guelph airport with the tiger boys. Anyway, I want to build it as a display model, so maybe a 20"-30" wingspan. Something that will hang from my bedroom ceiling well. I have a few questions.

1. Are there any important tips that I should know for a first scratchbuild? I have some balsa building experience, but only with precut kits.

2. Do you know where I could aquire a 3-view drawing of one? Would Google images be my best bet?

3. How do I determine the thickness of balsa I would use for the wing ribs, longerons, etc.

4. What is the best covering method for this ( tissue paper and paint or something like monokote?)
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Old Nov 21, 2012, 09:03 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
here's a 3-view. any better ones? http://www.doc8643.com/aircrafts/view/JARO
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Old Nov 22, 2012, 06:54 AM
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IIRC, there was an artcle with detailed scale drawings in Scale Models or Aeromodeller (at the time both published by Model Allied Press) of the 70's or 80's. Also, IIRC, an outfit called Nexis may still list them online. Google: MAP Scale drawings.

I had them clipped and stashed in my collection of "someday" build materials but a few years back I gave them away.

You might also make your wishes known on several threads here at RCgroups that deal with plans. Vintage model plans, Free Flight Plans etc. Scale drawings from Aeromodeller appear occasionally on the latter.

I encourage your scrathbuilding desire. It's not that hard, and yet tends to scare off many. First you may want to decide how large a model you would like to build. If it's about the size of the models you''ve already built use the lumber sizes they did. Soon you will develope a feel for different contruction styles and decide upon a favorite. One of the things I enjoy about modeling is discovering new ways to better my skills and add to my bag of tricks.

Best covering material is a can of worms. I like more natural products such as paper, tissue , silk. Silkspan, sometimes called "rice paper" is an excellent covering material for it's ease of application. There are also more modern synthetic films and fabrics. Each requires a learning curve before making it your own.
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Old Nov 22, 2012, 10:15 AM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by packardpursuit View Post
IIRC, there was an artcle with detailed scale drawings in Scale Models or Aeromodeller (at the time both published by Model Allied Press) of the 70's or 80's. Also, IIRC, an outfit called Nexis may still list them online. Google: MAP Scale drawings.

I had them clipped and stashed in my collection of "someday" build materials but a few years back I gave them away.

You might also make your wishes known on several threads here at RCgroups that deal with plans. Vintage model plans, Free Flight Plans etc. Scale drawings from Aeromodeller appear occasionally on the latter.

I encourage your scrathbuilding desire. It's not that hard, and yet tends to scare off many. First you may want to decide how large a model you would like to build. If it's about the size of the models you''ve already built use the lumber sizes they did. Soon you will develope a feel for different contruction styles and decide upon a favorite. One of the things I enjoy about modeling is discovering new ways to better my skills and add to my bag of tricks.

Best covering material is a can of worms. I like more natural products such as paper, tissue , silk. Silkspan, sometimes called "rice paper" is an excellent covering material for it's ease of application. There are also more modern synthetic films and fabrics. Each requires a learning curve before making it your own.
Thanks for your help! I will definitely post on the free flight and vintage forums. I will probably end up using tissue paper and paint because it's cheap
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Old Nov 22, 2012, 10:57 AM
UMs & parkflyers... for now.
davidterrell80's Avatar
United States, VA, Herndon
Joined Apr 2012
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If I'm not mistaken one of the people here has a Jackeroo as his avatar. I believe i saw in the the Gypsy Moth thread... yes! look up Mark Winstanley (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?u=7226).

In his post HERE, he said he designed a Jackeroo a few years ago. He might have plans.

HERE is his build thread.

It says that "the Jackeroo is a modified DH82A Tiger Moth into a four seat configuration." you might be able to take plans for the Tiger Moth and use them as a basis for work.

HERE is a simple plan to begin your thinking.

Hopes this helps without being overly so.
David

PS. Edited to point to THIS, where Mr. Winstanly was pursuing the same mission as you.
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Old Nov 23, 2012, 08:33 AM
Coming home to Canada soon
Mark Winstanley's Avatar
Canada, ON, Ottawa
Joined Jan 2002
565 Posts
Thruxton Jackaroo

Jeremy; Hi. Got your PM.

The Thruxton Jackaroo is a great varient of the original Tiger Moth. It used the fuselage aft section and nose section and built a new centre section to accommodate 4 people. Of course de Havilland did the same when they designed the Fox Moth only they left the poor pilot out in the weather. The nose is extended slightly for CG reasons and the wings are moved out by the same amount that the fuselage was widened.

I designed and built mine a few years back to compete in a build what you design comp here on RCGroups in the scale area. My model was about 44" span for electric power (I will post some photos over the weekend. You are quite welcome to a copy of the plans but they are in a "builders state" (ie not really user friendly). If you want a smaller one I can scale it down for you. You didnt say whether you wanted it to be a flying scale model or not.

The 3 views I used were from the Aeromodeller plans service (I think I have scans somewhere - I will look this weekend.

Best of luck with the project and dont forget to keep us posted.

David; well spotted not many people can recognise a Jackeroo - let alone from an avatar.
Happy US Thanksgiving. Us Canadians had ours a month ago.

Mark.
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Old Nov 23, 2012, 05:01 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Winstanley View Post
Jeremy; Hi. Got your PM.

The Thruxton Jackaroo is a great varient of the original Tiger Moth. It used the fuselage aft section and nose section and built a new centre section to accommodate 4 people. Of course de Havilland did the same when they designed the Fox Moth only they left the poor pilot out in the weather. The nose is extended slightly for CG reasons and the wings are moved out by the same amount that the fuselage was widened.

I designed and built mine a few years back to compete in a build what you design comp here on RCGroups in the scale area. My model was about 44" span for electric power (I will post some photos over the weekend. You are quite welcome to a copy of the plans but they are in a "builders state" (ie not really user friendly). If you want a smaller one I can scale it down for you. You didnt say whether you wanted it to be a flying scale model or not.

The 3 views I used were from the Aeromodeller plans service (I think I have scans somewhere - I will look this weekend.

Best of luck with the project and dont forget to keep us posted.

David; well spotted not many people can recognise a Jackeroo - let alone from an avatar.
Happy US Thanksgiving. Us Canadians had ours a month ago.

Mark.
hey, thanks for your help! I would love some plans if it's not to much trouble. between 26" and 30" wingspan. I was planning this to be a display-only model, and then I was thinking about making a tiger moth as a flying model.
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Old Nov 23, 2012, 05:13 PM
UMs & parkflyers... for now.
davidterrell80's Avatar
United States, VA, Herndon
Joined Apr 2012
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I'm glad I could be helpful. makes my day better.
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Old Nov 24, 2012, 02:03 AM
Coming home to Canada soon
Mark Winstanley's Avatar
Canada, ON, Ottawa
Joined Jan 2002
565 Posts
Jeremy; while I was looking through my files I came across a plan for Peter Rakes Tiger Moth. I used to kit this when I ran Kanata Aircraft Models. The plan is for a model 36" span and shows a plastic cowl. It is an easy job to build a cowl from ply and balsa. I have also included the parts drawing that was used to generate the laser cut parts. If you like I can modify the fuselage to become a Jackaroo at this scale. You should be able to print these out using Adobe viewer in tile format.

My Jackaroo was larger at 46" span. It flew as you would expect a Tiger Moth to fly with no bad vices.

Mark.
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Old Nov 24, 2012, 04:46 AM
Coming home to Canada soon
Mark Winstanley's Avatar
Canada, ON, Ottawa
Joined Jan 2002
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here are some photos of my Tiger Moth prototype for inspiration.

Mark
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Old Nov 24, 2012, 06:59 AM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Winstanley View Post
Jeremy; while I was looking through my files I came across a plan for Peter Rakes Tiger Moth. I used to kit this when I ran Kanata Aircraft Models. The plan is for a model 36" span and shows a plastic cowl. It is an easy job to build a cowl from ply and balsa. I have also included the parts drawing that was used to generate the laser cut parts. If you like I can modify the fuselage to become a Jackaroo at this scale. You should be able to print these out using Adobe viewer in tile format.

My Jackaroo was larger at 46" span. It flew as you would expect a Tiger Moth to fly with no bad vices.

Mark.
If you wouldn't mind editing it to become a jackaroo, that would be awesome! Are the photos above of a regular tiger moth or a jackaroo?
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Old Nov 24, 2012, 07:23 AM
Coming home to Canada soon
Mark Winstanley's Avatar
Canada, ON, Ottawa
Joined Jan 2002
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The above are the tiger. Here are a couple of shots of the Jackaroo

Mark
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Old Nov 24, 2012, 04:23 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
That jackaroo looks really nice!
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Old Nov 25, 2012, 04:51 AM
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Mark Winstanley's Avatar
Canada, ON, Ottawa
Joined Jan 2002
565 Posts
Well here is a fuselage plan for the Thruxton Jackaroo. The construction sequence I would suggest is as follows:
1. build the fuselage tail section sides over the side view. Note the 1/16" fill under the tailplane and the positive incidence of the tailplane.
2. join the sides over the plan view making sure all is square and true.
3. construct the forward fuselage inverted over the plan view using F1, F4 and 1/8" square balsa. Note that the top is wider than the bottom at F5. Glue in uprights as detailed on the side view.
4. Join the forward and aft fuselages together while pinned over the plan view. Again, make sure all is square and true before the glue sets.
5. while still over the plan view add in the 1/8" ply U/C cross pieces and inset 1/16" sheet into the bottom to close the fuselage. Leave the hatch area between the lower wings open.
6. Remove from plan and add the upper formers. You will have to make F5 and F6 by laminating 1/16x1/8 balsa around a form cut out of card or balsa. You might need to soak the strip balsa before bending. I think I managed to bend without soaking and glued with thin CA.
7. Cover the aft fuselage upper with 1/32 balsa. Again be careful bending around the curves. Soaking helps.
8. Add the interplane struts made from 1/8 x 1/4 spruce. make sure they are flush with F4.
9. the front fuselage between F1 and F2 is covered with 1/16 balsa.
10. Install the radio per your own preferences. On the larger Jackaroo I used pull-pull controls on both rudder and elevator using scale routing.
11. Construct the cowling by temporarily jigging C2 and C3 onto F1 and making a template for the 1/32 ply cowling skin. When satisfied with the cowling, remove and add C1 and shape per plan.
12. Make the UC from 1/16 and 1/32 dia wire soldered together.
13. Make the upper wing centre section as detailed and add to the cabane struts.

Use the Tiger Moth wings and tail to complete.

If you build it please open a construction thread and let me know of any errors on the drawings.

Happy building.

Mark.
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Old Nov 27, 2012, 02:38 PM
Obeying the law of gravity
Jeremy Kamutzki's Avatar
Canada, ON, Cambridge
Joined Jul 2011
494 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Winstanley View Post
Well here is a fuselage plan for the Thruxton Jackaroo. The construction sequence I would suggest is as follows:
1. build the fuselage tail section sides over the side view. Note the 1/16" fill under the tailplane and the positive incidence of the tailplane.
2. join the sides over the plan view making sure all is square and true.
3. construct the forward fuselage inverted over the plan view using F1, F4 and 1/8" square balsa. Note that the top is wider than the bottom at F5. Glue in uprights as detailed on the side view.
4. Join the forward and aft fuselages together while pinned over the plan view. Again, make sure all is square and true before the glue sets.
5. while still over the plan view add in the 1/8" ply U/C cross pieces and inset 1/16" sheet into the bottom to close the fuselage. Leave the hatch area between the lower wings open.
6. Remove from plan and add the upper formers. You will have to make F5 and F6 by laminating 1/16x1/8 balsa around a form cut out of card or balsa. You might need to soak the strip balsa before bending. I think I managed to bend without soaking and glued with thin CA.
7. Cover the aft fuselage upper with 1/32 balsa. Again be careful bending around the curves. Soaking helps.
8. Add the interplane struts made from 1/8 x 1/4 spruce. make sure they are flush with F4.
9. the front fuselage between F1 and F2 is covered with 1/16 balsa.
10. Install the radio per your own preferences. On the larger Jackaroo I used pull-pull controls on both rudder and elevator using scale routing.
11. Construct the cowling by temporarily jigging C2 and C3 onto F1 and making a template for the 1/32 ply cowling skin. When satisfied with the cowling, remove and add C1 and shape per plan.
12. Make the UC from 1/16 and 1/32 dia wire soldered together.
13. Make the upper wing centre section as detailed and add to the cabane struts.

Use the Tiger Moth wings and tail to complete.

If you build it please open a construction thread and let me know of any errors on the drawings.

Happy building.

Mark.
thanks so much! I will definately open a thread and let you know of any errors.
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