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Old Jul 02, 2015, 11:25 AM
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Learning how to really FLY a done in manual mode

So many drones have technology now that allows unskilled "pilots" (actually joystick pushers), to operate a drone sometimes with disaster just an electronic glitch away.

The vast majority of lost drones and crashes are probably by such wanna be pilots.

Real pilots who can proficiently FLY their drone not only outbound, but also inbound and at 90 degrees without the aid of a compass, GPS or other electronic automated guidance system are far less likely to lose their drones.

That said, I am a quad beginner. But I recognize the situation and have committed myself to learning to fly FIRST with absolutely no onboard navigation assistance. In other works, training my brain to control the quad fully manually.

Having flown RC for years (but not recently), I might have a very slight advantage over the newcomer. But I would not say it's a great advantage. I have found that learning yo control the quad is a new learning curve and although I probably got hovering and outbound control down faster, I still have a long way to go on the 90 degree and inbound control.

That said, my approach is just to go slow. I don't have an actual training plan that will help me learn the inbound and 90 angle moves. I just keep pushing the envelope a little more and more.

The Question:
So I was wondering if there was a technique to practice that to help quickly develop the flying inbound (head first) and flying at right angles?
Or is it just a matter of pushing the envelope until it clicks?
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 12:49 PM
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I picked up this hobby myself 8-9 months ago and I'm pretty sure I found a training regimen online... I think it was for RC helicopters, actually. I can't find the link now, but it was basically this-

Hover, truly keep it in it's place, nose-out.
Hover, in place, nose-in.
Hover and Pirouette (30+ seconds per turn) without loosing altitude.

Fly out and back, in a straight line, nose-out.
Fly out and back, in a straight line, nose-in.
Repeat for left and right, straight line.

Fly a box pattern, nose-out, clockwise.
Fly a box pattern, nose-out, counter-clockwise.
Repeat for nose-in.

Fly the box pattern, but yaw to the forward direction, stop and hover at each corner.
... then remove the stops and basically do circles, then figure-8s.

I started in the winter, with a toy, a Syma X5C, flying these patterns in the garage. I didn't move to the next one until I'd mastered the one before it. I crashed that little thing a LOT!

It took me 3 weeks or a little more to get through all those steps. Then I bought a CX-20 in February and went through the same motions outside.. getting used to the power difference of "this is definitely not a toy!".
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 12:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherMember View Post
So many drones have technology now that allows unskilled "pilots" (actually joystick pushers), to operate a drone sometimes with disaster just an electronic glitch away.
As far as I know, if there are no special RC aircrafts, every rc pilot are stick pushers since they use transmitters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherMember View Post
Real pilots who can proficiently FLY their drone not only outbound, but also inbound and at 90 degrees without the aid of a compass, GPS or other electronic automated guidance system are far less likely to lose their drones.
Real pilots sit in the aircraft and are educated and have pilot qualification. If we remove electronic automated guidance I don't think any aircraft could be flown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherMember View Post
In other works, training my brain to control the quad fully manually.
No self leveling, no gyro? Good luck.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherMember View Post
The Question:
So I was wondering if there was a technique to practice that to help quickly develop the flying inbound (head first) and flying at right angles?
Or is it just a matter of pushing the envelope until it clicks?
Start from scratch, hovering in different positions, and then, what's worked for me: I started to fly in circles in different directions and in different engels while I played with the aileron and rudder.
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 01:06 PM
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No self leveling, no gyro? Good luck.
Self-leveling uses the Accelerometer not the Gyro. In Acro or Rate mode the Gyro is ALWAYS in use. This is just to stabilize motors from the RC TX control inputs NOT to fly for you.

I for one of many here fly only Rate mode on LOS Aerobatic and FPV copters. It is just lots and lots and lots of practice and tends to require lots of broken props and sometimes broken frames etc.
Rate mode gives the pilot the most connected flying as the copter does only exactly what the pilot commands. If the pilot makes a mistake then the copter crashes.
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by waltr View Post
Self-leveling uses the Accelerometer not the Gyro. In Acro or Rate mode the Gyro is ALWAYS in use. This is just to stabilize motors from the RC TX control inputs NOT to fly for you.
Thanks for the correction. Stabilize the motors, stabilisation is great many times.
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 02:31 PM
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Quote:
The Question:
So I was wondering if there was a technique to practice that to help quickly develop the flying inbound (head first) and flying at right angles?
Or is it just a matter of pushing the envelope until it clicks?
1 week practice (6 min 47 sec)


This is how i practice. It's getting late, but if you want i can list down the exercises. Tho they're essentially the same ones you do when practicing on a helicopter.
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 02:51 PM
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http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2448591

This was a recent thread that has some decent information about learning basic piloting and orientation skills.

Learning to pilot a multi-rotor well takes a lot of practice and then more practice.

Good Luck=

JB
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Karolien View Post
Real pilots sit in the aircraft and are educated and have pilot qualification. If we remove electronic automated guidance I don't think any aircraft could be flown.
.
Are you a "real" pilot?
The context was actually limited to RC quads in this forum.
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 08:14 PM
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Well if u lose orientation slowly throttle up and if it goes left turn left and if it goes right turn rightthis will make it fly back towards u.
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 08:31 PM
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Fly a little one like one of the Hubsans. Crash it a lot. Fly it nose out, nose in and sideways. Suddenly, it just clicks.

I went through 3 little ones. Broke one pretty bad and kept it for parts. Lost one outside in a tall tree. Still have the 3d one after more than a year. I haven't crashed it in a long, long time and it's still fun to fly.

I've had a Blade 350QX3 AP for about 7 months. It's a piece of cake to fly and I feel safe with gps disabled. But it's kind of boring, so I'm looking at something like the new Walkera 250 Racing Drone.

It no longer matters to me which way the quad is facing. I think your brain just figured it out at some point.
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Old Jul 02, 2015, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnotherMember View Post
So many drones have technology now that allows unskilled "pilots" (actually joystick pushers), to operate a drone sometimes with disaster just an electronic glitch away.

The vast majority of lost drones and crashes are probably by such wanna be pilots.

Real pilots who can proficiently FLY their drone not only outbound, but also inbound and at 90 degrees without the aid of a compass, GPS or other electronic automated guidance system are far less likely to lose their drones.

That said, I am a quad beginner. But I recognize the situation and have committed myself to learning to fly FIRST with absolutely no onboard navigation assistance. In other works, training my brain to control the quad fully manually.

Having flown RC for years (but not recently), I might have a very slight advantage over the newcomer. But I would not say it's a great advantage. I have found that learning yo control the quad is a new learning curve and although I probably got hovering and outbound control down faster, I still have a long way to go on the 90 degree and inbound control.

That said, my approach is just to go slow. I don't have an actual training plan that will help me learn the inbound and 90 angle moves. I just keep pushing the envelope a little more and more.

The Question:
So I was wondering if there was a technique to practice that to help quickly develop the flying inbound (head first) and flying at right angles?
Or is it just a matter of pushing the envelope until it clicks?
I was ahead of the game because I've been flying helis since 1990.

Try here: http://www.helifreak.com/forumdisplay.php?f=242
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Old Jul 03, 2015, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by 67walkon View Post
Fly a little one like one of the Hubsans. Crash it a lot. Fly it nose out, nose in and sideways. Suddenly, it just clicks.

I went through 3 little ones. Broke one pretty bad and kept it for parts. Lost one outside in a tall tree. Still have the 3d one after more than a year. I haven't crashed it in a long, long time and it's still fun to fly.

I've had a Blade 350QX3 AP for about 7 months. It's a piece of cake to fly and I feel safe with gps disabled. But it's kind of boring, so I'm looking at something like the new Walkera 250 Racing Drone.

It no longer matters to me which way the quad is facing. I think your brain just figured it out at some point.
This is what I was thinking too.
Waiting for the light bulb.
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Old Jul 03, 2015, 10:30 AM
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The problem with manual flying (non-FPV) is NOT LOSING TRACK OF the drone's orientation. This is most difficult at > 100 feet unless you have 20/20 vision which many of us DO NOT. So for me, autonomous/auto mode is THE ONLY WAY TO FLY. Pixhawk is a savior.
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Old Jul 03, 2015, 10:58 AM
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LOS and orientation just requires lots and lots and lots of practice. This means hundreds of hours flying and years of practice. After this you will know the orientation from what stick movement you input without really being able to see the copter well and even with no orientation markings like colored props..
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Old Jul 03, 2015, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waltr View Post
LOS and orientation just requires lots and lots and lots of practice. This means hundreds of hours flying and years of practice. After this you will know the orientation from what stick movement you input without really being able to see the copter well and even with no orientation markings like colored props..
^^^^^ I agree.
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