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Old Sep 10, 2014, 10:37 AM
Life is a Hobby
Canada, ON, Delhi
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Top Flite Cessna 182 balsa kit build

Did a search for a complete build on this kit and was surprised nothing came up in the fueler forums. Very short thread in the electric conversion forum that went nowhere. Single posts here and there in the club section. Lots of stuff on the ARF but nothing on the balsa kit.

Twenty years ago I did a photo walkaround of a brand new full scale Cessna 182 on amphibious pontoons in a local airpark. Went out and bought the kit. Patterned it after the walkaround. Great flyer but never had it on pontoons. Flew it many years until it wore out. The torque of the front LG strut landing on a grass field is tough on the firewall. Once the firewall starts to separate difficult to reglue it.

Time to build another one. Went into Toronto yesterday to my favourite LHS and bought the balsa kit. The power for this iteration of the walkaround will be an NGH GT17 gasser. The engine is well broken in on a .61 Escapade.

This time the 182 will be wearing 46 inch styrofoam pontoons from SeaPlane Supply. Will fly on wheels just long enough to trim out the plane and then it goes on pontoons with twin Ernst water rudders.

Horner wing tips were an option from Cessna. Simpler to build the standard wing tips. Or buy the fibreglass Horner tips for the ARF. But they include the wing tip nav lights which increases the cost.

I will be installing the cowl landing lights (20,000 white 10mm LED) and the tail strobe lights (10,000 white 5mm LED) The fin tip LED will be in a red lens. I build my own strobe board using a 7414 Schmidt Trigger and 9 volt battery.

Pix below of the walkaround Cessna. Note the amphibious pontoons with the wheels chocked. Also note no fairings on the wing strut ends.
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Old Sep 12, 2014, 08:31 AM
Life is a Hobby
Canada, ON, Delhi
Joined Aug 2012
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Started by putting a new sheet of 60 grit on the sanding bar. Then sorted through the kit`s components. Divided up the hardware into small containers as to metal, nylon, size. Arranged the stamped sheets in order numerically and compared them to the die-cut diagrams in the manual for easy identification . The various balsa sheets and shapes seem to be medium soft balsa of good quality.

Don`t like breathing CA fumes. Plan to do as much of this build as possible with aliphatic resin, specifically Lepage carpenter glue. Thin and medium CA will be used for quick grabs where more convenient than aliphatic.

First off are the tailfeathers. Punched out the stab ribs from their sheets. TF is using sharp stamping dies which allows the ribs to fall out cleanly with no crushed edges. Over the past year I have built TF Spitfire and P40 balsa kits and saw the same sharp stamping of ribs and formers in those kits. Those of us who balsa built 40 years ago remember crushed stamped parts due to dull dies. Costs money to maintain sharp dies which is part of the overall cost of a balsa kit.

The manual refers to stamped TEs for the stab/fin which were the most often crushed. Now they are actually laser cut with clean, sharp edges. The stab ribs have jig tabs which allows for easy setup over the plans for glueing. The fuselage plans have some sort of plasticized coating which I thought might mean no plastic sheet to protect the plans but I got some glue on the plans and they acted just like normal paper so still need the plastic sheet.

Thin CA allowed the stab ribs, LE and TE to go together quickly. Trimmed and contoured with the 60 grit. The top skin is applied first while the ribs are on their jigs. Went through the stack of 3x30x1/16 balsa sheets to make up the skin. They all looked cut from the same medium soft balsa log. Very nice. Edge glued two sheets together with aliphatic resin. To apply the skin used medium CA along the LE for a quick anchor and apliphatic along the rib tops and the TE. Weighed down with shot bags while the aliphatic cured. Can handle in an hour.

Before applying the bottom skin had to think about the hinges. CA hinge material is provided in the kit but no CA hinges for this guy. This Summer had complete CA hinge failures (de-lamination) in the air in the rudder of my .61 Escapade and the elevator of my TF Spitfire. More luck than anything else that the two airplanes survived. Re-hinged both planes with Robart hinge points and will be using hinge points on the rudder and elevator in this Cessna build.

Used scrap 1/2 inch balsa to glue hinge blocks inside the stab TE to grab the whole hinge point. Pre-drilled for the hinges before applying the bottom skin. This allows you to make sure the holes are centered on the blocks. Also if the holes are drilled with both skins on then wood chips wind up rattling around inside the stab. Cut off the rib jigs, trimmed and contoured. There are no jigs when applying the bottom skin so care must be taken to avoid a warp. One side glued at a time.

If installing the red strobe at the fin tip a hole must be drilled through the center of each fin rib for the pushrod tube that routes the strobe wiring. The fin goes together same way as the stab. The fin is swept back at an angle so care must be taken that the hinge blocks are placed allowing the hinge holes to be drilled at right angles to the fin`s TE.

Pix below of the stab/fin build.
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Old Sep 13, 2014, 09:38 AM
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Are you going to make the vertical like the old style in the one in your pic, or keep the swept style?

Personally, I like the old style.... just a classic look.
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Old Sep 13, 2014, 11:15 AM
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Am going to keep the old style on the rudder top as in the full scale pix above. Simpler build and I agree looks nicer.

The finished airplane has to fit into my small hatchback so did some comparing to the fuselage of my 70 inch Revolver which fits in OK. The Revolver`s stab is 27 1/2 inch wide , the Cessna`s is 26 1/2, actually smaller. The Revolver`s fuselage is 59 inch long, the Cessna`s 64.5, not that much longer. The Revolver goes in the hatch tail first, wings off, with the tail hanging over the flattened passenger seat. The Cessna will go in the same way and be sticking farther towards the windshield. I live in a rural area 10 minutes from my club`s field so there is not much of a problem with the tail slightly obscuring my vison out the right side.

The Cessna will have 22 inch plug-in wing tips containing the ailerons. There is a natural break between the inner flap section and outer aileron section. In a one piece wing ply joiners are glued between the sections. I will be using 5/8 by 17 inch carbon fibre tubes to join the sections with a screw at either end of the tubes holding things together. This will give a wing center section 38 inch wide that will remain mounted on the fuse and will fit easily into the car. Just as important to me the wing struts will remain mounted so I don`t have to stand on one ear at the field putting on wing struts.

Have skinned the stab and fin. Working on the elevators.

Pix below of the underside of the full scale Cessna wing. Shows relationship between the wing strut, flap section and aileron section.
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Old Sep 15, 2014, 08:44 AM
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Finished glueing on the stab and fin skins from the 30x3x1/16 sheets.

A longer batch of 36x3x1/16 balsa sheets are provided for the rudder/elevator/wing skins. Sorted through them and found 5 different balsa logs, all medium soft, grouped 5,4,4,3,1 sheets respectively. Looking ahead to the aileron/flap wing sections which need four skins of 3 sheets each, set aside those 12 sheets, one log per skin.

Used two of the remaining sheets to make the rudder/elevator skins. The manual says use three sheets for this but can easily be done with two sheets. The rudder and elevators have a different type of build than the stab/fin. LE and ribs layed down directly on one skin. No TE stick. Torque blocks for the control arms glued in. Blocks for the hinge points glued in and pre-drilled. Trued up and the other skin glued on.

Dry hinged and taped the elevators to the stab to glue on the tip blocks. One block is medium soft balsa while the other is medium. Not a big enough difference in weight to replace the harder one. The manual says to cut the tip blocks BEFORE glueing to the stab/elevators. Seemed easier to me to glue the tip blocks on in one piece and shape them while the stab/elevator are locked together to ensure a consistent shape between the stab and elevators. Then cut the tip blocks AFTER all shaping is done. Blocks for the balance horns on the elevators are then glued in making sure there is sufficient gap between the horns and the stab. Horn tips rounded.

The two elevator halves are joined together by a shaped 1/8 wire joiner with a control horn soldered to the wire. I checked the solder joint and cleaned it up before drilling the 9/64 holes into the elevators for the wire. Used a sharpened 5/32 brass tube to cut a groove for the wire so it could sit flush to the elevator LE. Checked for no bind between the stab, elevators, hinges and joiner wire.

The rudder goes together the same way. The tips of the fin and rudder are two different blocks because of the balance horn gap. The fin block is medium soft and the rudder is medium which makes shaping a bit tricky. Wood will come off the fin block faster than the rudder block due to the difference in hardness so have to be careful around their junction with the 60 grit. The rudder tip block also forms the balance horn. When hinging the rudder to the fin must watch the clearance gaps between the horn and the fin.

Before final shaping of the fin tip I fit in the red strobe lens. The lens will be sitting in a brass tube pedestal. Used the sharpened end of the tube to bore the hole down to the top rib and the pushrod tube that will bring the wiring up to the LED in the lens.

The finished top of the fin/rudder has a different shape than the TF plans and is slightly different than the above full scale photo. Look at 20 Cessnas and you will see 20 different shapes due to the type of nav lights in the tail and what streamlining was used. I am a believer in the KISS principle and shaped the tops accordingly.

Digitals below of the 95% finished tail groups. The rudder/elevator LEs will not be "V-ed" until just before covering. Easier to lock flat surfaces together if more shaping needed.
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Old Sep 16, 2014, 12:46 AM
KNS
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Old Sep 17, 2014, 07:38 PM
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On to the wing. Center cabin section is built first.

All wing sections are built upside down on rib jigs. That way parts such as servo rails and wing bolt plates can be glued in for added strength while the frame is fragile before sheeting.

The center section seems like a simple structure but there is a lot going on here. The LE dowels and TE wing bolt plates will eventually tie the wing to the fuselage. The dihedral angle is set in the end ribs. If the wing is to sit properly on the fuselage then these 5 ribs, LE and TE must all fit square and level.

I was impressed by the way all components of the center section interlock, tied together like a jig saw puzzle. Everything slid into place with no tweaking. I was not impressed with the rib jigs breaking off seemingly by themselves. I have built many TF balsa kits and don`t remember this problem. Will write it off as a fluke probably due to fault lines in the balsa. Sanded the jig breaks smooth and will replace with a 1/4x5/8x9 balsa stick under the jig locations when the time comes for sheeting.

Checked that everything was lined up and level and tacked together with thin CA. Shear webs are glued both sides of the spars between ribs W1 and W2. Reglued all joints with aliphatic and let sit overnight.

Now is the time to decide on a top hatch to get at the Rx, servos and battery(s) if taking the wing off is a problem. I will be using a JR Rx switch with charging jack. The 2300 NiMH battery will be a dual Rx/ignition source so only need the one charge jack. I won`t be building a top hatch but others may deem it necessary.

Center section is not sheeted until the dihedral braces are glued in to the outer wing panels so just the barebones for now.

Pix below showing the internal parts of this small but important structure.
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Old Sep 19, 2014, 09:12 AM
Life is a Hobby
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The wing panels are built upside down on rib jigs. What looks like the right panel is actually the left. Have to keep reminding yourself.

Ten years ago scratch built a 7 foot PBY with plug-in aileron panels. Used the lessons learned from that build to think my way through improvements for this Cessna build. Spent a full day visualising the steps for a successful plug-in.

The locking and alignment mechanisms have to be sturdy but light. All the action is at the boundary of wing ribs W6 and W7. The aileron panel goes from W7 to W14. In a one piece wing the upper and lower main spars would be solid through the W6/W7 boundary. With a plug-in wing tip, the main spars will be cut through at the boundary. So a new removable spar structure has to secure the aileron panel.

Started with a 3/16 wood dowel anti-rotation pin at the rear of W6/W7 in front of the flap spar with doublers around the pin hole. The pin won`t be glued in until the aileron panel has been cut free. As the removable one piece spar in the PBY I used a 1/4 inch wood dowel sliding in aluminum arrow shafts glued through the ribs just behind the main spars. In the Cessna I decided to use carbon fibre arrow shafts with the same 1/4 inch dowel. This resists horizontal stresses. The arrow shaft holes through the ribs are reinforced with 1/16 hard ply doublers.

In the one piece wing, a 1/8 lite ply brace is glued across the W6/W7 junction between the main spars. To resist vertical torqueing across the W6/W7 cut in the plug-in, I made two copies of the lite ply brace out of 1/8 hard ply and laminated the three together with epoxy to give a 3/8 short spar. One end of the spar will be eventually glued outboard of W7. The inboard end will have an 8-32 allen head bolt going through it from the top of the wing through the top main spar and down through a T-nut at the bottom of the bottom main spar. I drilled the hole while the whole wing panel was still tied together but before glueing in the upper main spar which has to be removeable to insert and remove the short spar for drilling. After removing the short spar glued in the upper main spar.

To insert the short spar the center of ribs W6/W7 between the main spars has to be removed. This leaves very little support for the rib fronts between the main spars and the LE. I added 1/8 square sub-spars across the rib fronts for reinforcement.

After all this engineering the rest of the wing panel went together quickly. There are shear webs between the upper and lower spars down the length of the panel. I glued in 1/16 hard ply webs around the hole drilled through the main spars. I will be using flaps requiring a triangular sub-spar which did not fit into the provided rib cutouts but that was quickly remedied. There are three gussets reinforceing rib and spar junctions. I decided to add a fourth between W14 and the aileron sub-spar way out at the rear of the wing tip.

To route the aileron servo wire I rolled a tube out of Kraft paper around a 5/8 inch brass tube. The tube is glued through the ribs between the flap hatch and aileron hatch.

There will be no cut through the W6/W7 junction until the first skin has gone on. Partial cuts have already been made through the shaped LE and upper spar to allow them to bend around the junction. The cut will start at the LE then go back through the main spars and the carbon fibre arrow shaft. Then the anti-rotation pin will be removed and the cut completed out the rear.

After the cut ends are cleaned up the short spar and pin will be glued in place, everything put back together and the second skin glued on. Then a skin cut through W6/W7 avoiding the pin, short spar and 1/4 dowel.

Digitals below of the left wing panel so far.
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Old Sep 22, 2014, 08:36 AM
Life is a Hobby
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Made up the 1/16 wing skins, 2 for the center section and 4 for the wing sections. Didn`t take long edge glueing the balsa sheets with aliphatic. Must say that TF supplied excellent medium soft balsa for the skins. Was able to group the sheets from 5 different logs for minimum sanding before edge glueing.

One thing that did seem a little odd was the instruction to not make the skins wide enough at their roots to cover the flap section. This requires glueing a patchwork of balsa sheet after the main skin is glued on. I cut the 36 inch sheet in half left over from the rudder build (only needed 2, not 3) and edge glued the 18 inch section at the root of the main skin which covered the flap section but still required a small triangle of balsa over the aileron sub-spar.

The manual says to glue both wing sections to the center section before skinning. I didn`t want a big 81 inch flopping around while fitting the skins before glueing. Decided to not glue the right wing (it isn`t even built yet). The right wing jigging is independent of the left.

Only the bottom skins are to be glued on at this stage. The center section then the left outer. At first I had the shaped 1/2 inch TEs glued to the small rib ends. After knocking one off for the third time I took both off and decided to prep the wing skins the same as for the elevators and rudder. Extend the wing skins 1/2 inch beyond the rib ends and feather the 1/2 inch to half thickness. The upper and lower skins will meet at the TE and be glued together with thin CA. If you look at the TE of a full scale Cessna it is almost razor sharp being two thin aluminum sheets meeting from the top and bottom of the wing.

The frame is set up over the various jigs and the center skin is cut and fit to its ribs. Aliphatic is layed on the center rib edges and spars. The skin layed on square and weights applied. This is the advantage of aliphatic for this process. There is no instant grab like CA allowing for lining up the skin properly. Also no fumes!

Let cure for 1/2 hour then repeated the process for the left wing. Let sit overnight and then the moment of truth - separating the aileron panel from the main wing. Used a razor saw blade with the spine removed to start at the leading edge and work back through the spars and carbon fibre tube. Reached the anti-rotation pin, took it out and went back out through the TE. The aileron section came off cleanly. Took the sanding bar to the cut ends and cleaned them up. Went around all sides of the skins and trimmed to shape.

The ends of the main wing panel will be left clean so nothing can hang up when inserting the Cessna into my hatchback with the main wing panels attached to the fuselage. The aileron sections will have the glued short spar and anti-rotation pin and be placed in wing bags where nothing can snag. The removeable long spar will be carried separate.

Re-assembled the aileron section with the short spar, long spar and anti-rotation pin but no glue. Everything fit well. Put the 8/32 T-nut in place and tightened the 8/32 bolt through the short spar. This gave a compressed area in the balsa skin under the T-nut which was removed and the bolt re-tightened. Took all apart, placed epoxy in the short spar pocket in the aileron panel, inserted the short spar and long spar, re-assembled with the bolt. Also placed a dab of epoxy on the aileron side of the anti-rotation pin. Let sit overnight and there we are, a plug-in aileron panel.

Glued in the blocks for the flap hinges and the wing strut. Cut the wing bolt holes and flap LE slot. Now on to building the right wing. The left aileron panel can be left off for the right build and skinning.

Pix below of the skinned and detached left wing.
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Old Sep 28, 2014, 08:12 AM
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Finished the right wing. Same build as the left.

Those of us who have built balsa kits for many years realize that some parts of a kit will have to be replaced because warped or too hard balsa. This TF Cessna kit has been very good so far but had to replace a 1/8 ply wing joiner that would be the center of the laminated short spar glued into the aileron panel. The joiner warped into a banana when removed from the stamped sheet. I keep a 1/8 lite ply sheet handy for such events and it was a simple matter to cut a new joiner.

Before starting the build I went through all of the sticks and sheets and noticed that 3 of the 4 main balsa wing spars were straight but the fourth had a double warp in its center. Both ends were straight. A shorter 24 inch balsa stick is meant to be cut up for the servo rails. I cut 12 inches off the end of the warped spar and spliced it to the 24 inch stick to make a new straight 36 inch spar. The inboard end of the spar has a 1/8 hard balsa doubler glued to it and I placed the doubler over the splice. No big deal. You get used to doing these things. Saves a trip to the LHS.

So now with both wing halves glued to the center section and the plug-in aileron panels both set up, time to look at the ailerons and wing tip blocks. Horner wing tips are an option from Cessna and I will be carving standard wing tip shapes. Lot simpler.

The ailerons are a bit of a surprise to me. The rudder, elevators and flaps are built up with ribs on skins and as a result are very light. The ailerons in this kit are solid shaped lengths of medium soft balsa. I had flashbacks to a TF pre-GE P40 kit 30 years ago where the shaped solid ailerons were hard as rocks and very warped. These Cessna ailerons are a good quality light balsa and not warped. Their combined weight uncut is 3 oz. They will lose a bit of weight when cut to fit their slot in the wing and having their hinge lines cut. I toyed with the idea of replacing them with built up skin and ribs but decided to keep it simple and go with the kit. The ailerons will be undercut like flaps and live hinged with the SolarTex covering.

The flaps are not cut out of the wing until the tip blocks are glued on and carved to shape. The ailerons are taped to the wing with their TEs lined up with the flap TEs as a guide for carving the tip block TEs. The tip blocks are medium balsa which with their size makes them heavy, combined weight of 10 oz uncarved. The reason for the large size is the Horner wing tip option. Needs a lot of wood for carving. I am doing standard wing tips so at least 1/2, maybe 2/3, of the wood will disappear as chips and sawdust on the shop floor.

Wrapped masking tape on the balsa wing skins next to the tip blocks and had at it with a cardboard cutter and 60 grit, making sure the two wing tips wound up with the same profile. When finished weighed both aileron panels. Pleasant surprise. They were identical at 8.2 oz each. Will be interesting to see their final weight with servos and covering.

Next operation is cutting out the flaps.

Digital below of a size comparison with the 57 inch top wing of my GP Super Skybolt.
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Old Sep 30, 2014, 09:00 AM
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Cutting the flaps out of the wing requires some care and patience.

Narrow strips of balsa are removed top and bottom along the flap LE between the flap and wing sub-spars. Then I used a razor saw blade with the spine removed to cut through die-cut lines on the flap ribs. The rear line first which allows removal of the flap from the wing. Then the front line to remove most of the rib stub from the wing TE. A sanding bar cleaned up the face of the flap and 60 grit wrapped around a 1/2 inch dowel contoured the remaining rib stubs on the wing TE. All this leaves a 1/4 inch overhang of 1/16 balsa wing skin over the flap LE. The overhang is reinforced with strips of scrap balsa between the stubs.

All during the wing build I was eyeballing the clearance gaps at the inboard and outboard ends of the flaps. Outboard the aileron end can be trimmed for the clearance. Inboard, ribs W3 and W4 are layed down tight against each other with dire warnings not to get glue between their ends. No clearance gap. I kept thinking the manual would come up with a magic instruction to resolve the problem but never happened. So........after completing the wing build and cutting out the flaps I cut the inboard ends of each flap which moved the end rib in 1/16 inch and then reglued the end rib.

The flap control horns are 1/16 hard ply stamped out of a sheet. They are hidden inside the wing for a scale look. This is where it is crucial to think your way around building the wing halves upside down over the wing plans. During the build the flap on the left hand side is actually the right flap. When the flap is cut out of the wing it is over-cut, not under-cut like other flaps I have built over the years. The control horns are placed in a different location in each flap because the servos are both facing the same direction. So make sure you know which flap is which and they are right side up before marking the locations and glueing in the control horns

The flap LEs are 1/2x1.25x14 medium soft sticks of balsa. One stick is light in colour while the other is darker which will be significant in a moment. The manual says glue the LEs on the flaps BEFORE carving the LEs to a scale rounded shape. This means cutting one end off the LE and fitting it around the control horn and then glueing and carving which would be a total pain around the horn. Also could cut the horn. Seemed simpler to me to carve and sand the LE to shape FIRST away from the flap and then AFTER fit around the horn and glue which I did.

Next trim the ends of the flaps and the skins in the wing pocket and get ready to drill the holes for the flap hinges. It helps to have marked the location of the hinge blocks on the wing TE when they were glued in. Or the wing plan can be looked at. I happened to have Robart Large Hinge Points in the parts box so that worked out good. Two stamped jigs are glued together as drill guides for the twelve 3/16 hinge holes. The jigs wrap around the wing TE and flap LE and do a good job. Careful not to drill through the top of the wing. The first flap went smoothly. All 6 holes lined up the first try.

The second flap was a different story. The darker balsa in the LE means more lignin and being medium soft means fibrous. This combines to grab the drill bit which makes it difficult to keep it centered on the mark while drilling. Had to slightly enlargen 4 of the 6 holes so there was no bind in the hinge points.

Openings are cut in the wing TE to allow entry of the flap horns into the wing. Hinge the flaps (no glue) to make sure everything swings freely. The hinges are glued after the Solartex covering job is complete which won`t be for a while.

Now we can start the fuselage.

Pix below of the flap build.
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Old Sep 30, 2014, 07:22 PM
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What a great way to simulate fowler flaps. I have thought bout how to accomplish that effect for upcoming projects.
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Old Oct 01, 2014, 07:36 AM
It's never done that before...
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Joined Aug 2012
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Looks like a great build! really cool flaps too! I really like the paint scheme of the full size you a replicating, but that is actually a Cessna 185 . Its no big deal, the only difference between the two is the vertical fin/ rudder shape. In fact, The original 182's were exactly the same as the 180 but just had a nose wheel instead of a tail wheel. The 185 is just a more powerful 180 with a larger vertical fin to accommodate the increased torque from the larger engine.

Good luck on the build, It really looks great!! Subbed!
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Old Oct 01, 2014, 09:42 AM
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I talked to the owner of the Cessna when I did the photo walkaround 20 years ago. He mentioned a "182 to 185 transition". I can`t remember his exact words. He was wishing there was a commercial kit to upgrade to a 3 blade prop to get the prop tips up out of the pontoon spray. That kit is now available. So I will be using a 15x7x3 MA prop on the RCGF 20cc gasser. This model will spend most of its time on 46 inch pontoons from SeaPlane Supply and I want the horsepower of the 20cc for the increased weight and drag of the pontoons.

The TF kit does have the longer, larger dorsal fin of the 185 almost reaching the rear cabin window. Maybe that is part of the transition the owner was talking about. I will leave it up to a full scale Cessna expert to comment on that.

Link to one of the companies selling the 3 blade conversion kit for the 182-185. http://hartzellprop.com/products/top...o-470-3-blade/
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Old Oct 01, 2014, 11:58 AM
It's never done that before...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erie_flyer View Post
I talked to the owner of the Cessna when I did the photo walkaround 20 years ago. He mentioned a "182 to 185 transition". I can`t remember his exact words. He was wishing there was a commercial kit to upgrade to a 3 blade prop to get the prop tips up out of the pontoon spray. That kit is now available. So I will be using a 15x7x3 MA prop on the RCGF 20cc gasser. This model will spend most of its time on 46 inch pontoons from SeaPlane Supply and I want the horsepower of the 20cc for the increased weight and drag of the pontoons.

The TF kit does have the longer, larger dorsal fin of the 185 almost reaching the rear cabin window. Maybe that is part of the transition the owner was talking about. I will leave it up to a full scale Cessna expert to comment on that.

Link to one of the companies selling the 3 blade conversion kit for the 182-185. http://hartzellprop.com/products/top...o-470-3-blade/
Sounds like you have everything worked out! I didn't know about the 182 to 185 conversion. I'll look into it!
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